No Nursing Shortage At The Present Time - page 27

by TheCommuter 69,873 Views | 340 Comments Senior Moderator

I am assured that some of you are reading this and saying to yourselves, "Duh! This topic is old hat. We already know there's a glut of nurses in many parts of the country, so why are you writing about this?" Here is my reason... Read More


  1. 1
    Quote from CrunchRN
    Many have no savings. I doubt they will retire in the expected numbers no matter how much they want to.
    Yes. I've previously mentioned that one-third of Baby Boomers have no (a.k.a. zero) retirement money saved, so I fully expect this subset of the population to continue working until the day they die.

    Since there's approximately 78 million Baby Boomers in the US, this would mean that 26 million middle-aged people have no retirement money whatsoever. Although it is true that these people are going to need healthcare and eventually die off in the next few decades, how are their medical bills going to be paid without some major strain on the system?
    silenced likes this.
  2. 3
    Quote from joanna73
    Interesting statistics. While there certainly is no shortage now, it's unfortunate that we aren't being proactive. Within the next 10 years, once people retire in record numbers and continue to access more health services, nursing could become a disaster. The fact is, nurses are working short in most facilities. All these unemployed and underemployed nurses will leave the profession, but when the time comes, we're going to need them.
    Yes, IF nurses start retiring in droves like expected there will be massive shortages nationwide. The problem is careers are not like paper towels, You can't train up a bunch of people then put them away until needed. The leaving and training needs to happen simultaneously.

    I used to think that all schools should be required to post the employment numbers of their grads. What percentage of their grads got jobs in their field of training within 6 months of graduation. Then I remembered that people often times believe what they want to believe regardless of what they are told.
    CNA1991, pyriticsilence, and Fiona59 like this.
  3. 5
    Quote from TheCommuter
    Yes, too many people externalize the blame for their own personal faults, poor decisions, and shortcomings. Personal responsibility seems to have been thrown out of the window in favor of the 'poor little me, woe is me' outlook on life.

    More people must face the music and be accountable when something goes wrong in their lives. Whatever happened to due diligence?
    I have a big issue with schools lying about how easy it is to get a job in the "rapidly expanding field of nursing," even in areas where it's very difficult for a new grad to find employment. It's fraudulent. My college did not try to pull the wool over our eyes (at least, not at orientation, after we were already in ). But I also have a problem with people who are willing to devote several years of their lives, and in the process take on a lot of debt, without doing any research at all as to career prospects.
    CNA1991, pyriticsilence, Fiona59, and 2 others like this.
  4. 4
    Even if nurses retire en masse in 10 to 15 years, that will do nothing for those who who graduated recently but still have not found jobs. A nursing degree has a shelf life and is perishable if unused. Managers want fresh, new grads with recent clincial experiences and while all the nursing information is fresh in their minds. When given a choice between a recent grad or someone who graduated 18 months ago but has never worked, most often the new grad will get the job.

    Nursing schools are typically distinct organizations and usually not connected with hospitals as many had been in the past. The are a business, like retail stores or service industries. In order to survive and be profitable they need to attract paying customers. While it may be unethical to tell perspective students that jobs are easy to find and that there is a nursing shortage, it's no more unusual than a fast food company promoting a dressing laden cheeseburger as healthy food.

    Students continue to flock to nursing school, even though many know that the 'nursing shortage' isn't a reality. They each believe they will be the exception and land a great, well-paying nursing job. I've read many posts on this site from graduates who have either given up or are about to give up after looking for a year or two (sometimes more) without as much as an interview. This is not the promise that was made by the nursing school, but it's certainly the reality of the situation.
  5. 2
    Quote from mommyof3girls
    This is depressing news as I prepare to enter nursing school.
    Me too! But I've wanted this for so long, I will do it anyway. There is a job shortage everwhere and not just in nursing. I think there is a nursing shortage I just don't think hospitals and facilities want to hire. They'd rather have one person doing the job of three people. Otherwise we wouldn't be hearing about nurses not getting breaks or having time to use the bathroom. That's just my opinion from postings I've read on here. Maybe mommyof3girls by the time we finish school, things will turn around. We can only hope.
    MochaRN424 and pinkishlimegreen like this.
  6. 2
    I am a LPN 4mos and I got lucky to get on with a surgery recov resort agency... I am elated because I almost went straight For RN, I get a lot Of those "You should have went straight For RN" remarks but now that I've done my research I know I've made the right decision For "me" now I am working towards my RN BSN and know I'll get a Job because I am advancing in experience as well as education not to mention making an excellent Nurse by not being afraid to get down n dirty with pt Care! All I can say guys Is hang in there be aggressive anf dont be afraid to start Low in Order to reach the top because at the end Of the day it's all in who you know in this game make many network connections and be the best Nurse that you can be no matter where you start. Admin already wants to introduce me to other RNs who are Job resourceful and I've only been working there For about 2mos..
    Fiona59 and pnut8377 like this.
  7. 0
    My main problem with this forum is the lack of specificity of what type of nurse cannot get a job? Location?
    CNA/PCA?
    LVN?
    ADN-RN
    BSN-RN?
    MSN-RN?

    I am in Texas so I dont see the hardships of getting a job(that everyone is complaining about), but it would be nice to be better informed about the rest of the country?
  8. 0
    Quote from Delgadido
    I am in Texas so I dont see the hardships of getting a job(that everyone is complaining about), but it would be nice to be better informed about the rest of the country?
    New York City, New Jersey, southern California, San Francisco Bay area, Philadelphia, and other major metro areas have horrible job markets for new grad RNs and LPNs.

    I live in the Dallas/Fort Worth area of Texas, where new grads are also struggling to find work. A nurse with the right mix of experience can find work in this area, but each new grad job posting receives several hundred applications and tons of competition.

    In addition, the Dallas area and surrounding cities have numerous schools of nursing that churn new grads into the local job market every few months. The local employment market cannot absorb all these new nurses, so many go unemployed.
  9. 0
    I will add that CNA/PCA's are not nurses. However, they too are feeling the crunch and having difficulty finding work.
  10. 5
    Quote from Patti_RN
    Even if nurses retire en masse in 10 to 15 years, that will do nothing for those who who graduated recently but still have not found jobs. A nursing degree has a shelf life and is perishable if unused. Managers want fresh, new grads with recent clincial experiences and while all the nursing information is fresh in their minds. When given a choice between a recent grad or someone who graduated 18 months ago but has never worked, most often the new grad will get the job.
    Exactly Patti, you nailed it... I have been saying the same thing since 09 when I graduated. It took me a year to land my first job.

    The ANA has used the nursing shortage as a scare tactic and a political tool to bring the importance of nursing to politicians, hospitals and physicians. Unfortunately their claims were very much exaggerated. I would read articles in 2009 and 2010 that this hiring freeze of new grads is temporary. It is now 2012 and new grads are still finding very difficult to find employment.

    Whats amazing to me is potential future nursing students come on to these forums and ignore all the warnings of no jobs and still pursue nursing... There are other great careers in health care just do some research.


    YES INDEED THE NURSING SHORTAGE IS OVER!!!!
    Last edit by TheCommuter on Aug 29, '12 : Reason: quotation blocks


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