My patient, my hope!

  1. I will try to keep this short, but so much info and feeling it will get lengthy...

    So I got a patient a few days ago. Thirty something female with altered LOC on admission, newly Dx Graves disease and uncontrolled diabetes. Found out that she lived at home and wasn't taking her meds, so her family stepped in. Sadly they knew nothing about diabetes and when she was acting oddly in the home, they would just give her lots of sugars. She was admitted with big time DKA!!!!!!! I got her three days after ICU, and she still was quite out of it and not talking.

    I walked in...cracked a joke about myself in my intro and she laughed so hard! It was set...she and I were going to get along big time! And we did! Something about her just took a piece of my heart and kept it...something I have really never experience just meeting a patient, and certainly not as strongly as this one!

    I went home and did a ton of research on Graves Disease, and really got a feel from actual websites from people suffering from it! That was quite helpful.

    She and I got along so well, but sadly yesterday after I left...she tried to leave the hospital and almost made it (found two streets away). The MD d/c'd her one on one in her room, and I said ONLY if she was by the RN desk (she was out of site of the RN desk till we moved her). Crud!

    So today it was like starting all over. She wasn't speaking...not even to me. She was angry and doped up and sedated. I felt my heart fall out! I spent all day just giving her choices and letting her have her space, and I told the MD's to trust me and I would have her speaking again an in better spirits by EOS.

    After I talked with her, with her not responding...I let her know she was going to have her space to figure things out, but I would not stop caring for her and making sure she was safe! About an hour later she was talking to me again and in tears telling me I was the only person that listened to her, and she really trusted me out of everyone! I let her tell me her story and we both cried and talked about life... It seems she was always being TOLD what was going on, and had no choices or info really! I promised I would change that post haste after our cry and hug...and I DID!

    I talked to all her MD's and told them what was up, they understood and really involved her in her plan of care (and not her family...she is beyond of age to make choices for herself!). She really didn't get along with her mother who was caring for her so I contacted discharge to see if she had other options...and I asked but one favor of her...

    "Talk to the MD's so that they know what is going on and involve you...if you stay silent they have nothing to go on like I do since we talked! Please just go through the motions if you have to...but answer their questions...be honest for your own well being...and if there is any problems let the nurses I will have caring for you (which I scheduled personally) know...they will contact me!".

    She felt so much better, and all three MD's were stunned at the sudden change in 8 hours! I simply told them...she may have a medical problem...but the HUMAN problem was a bigger wall...I started tending to that...now lets work with both and keep this going!

    I got her diabetic lessons for her and she agreed for her mother too. I got her counseling outside of hospital when she is out. And the MD's listened to her! And for the first time in my career...I gave a heart felt hug to a honest and true PATIENT that trusted me with her life!

    Sometimes we forget what it is like to be the pt. The 'you will do this and you will do that' with little regard to 'what works for you, is this okay or shall we look at other options?"...That maybe when someone lashes out it is something more basic than medical...and needs tending to as much if not more for the patients total well being!


    Just thought I would share this story...it sure reminded me again...and my heart is so filled with joy and hope for this wonderful person that I tear up just thinking of her and my professional yet very human relationship!
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  2. 20 Comments

  3. by   texas_lvn
    Quote from TriageRN_34
    I will try to keep this short, but so much info and feeling it will get lengthy...

    So I got a patient a few days ago. Thirty something female with altered LOC on admission, newly Dx Graves disease and uncontrolled diabetes. Found out that she lived at home and wasn't taking her meds, so her family stepped in. Sadly they knew nothing about diabetes and when she was acting oddly in the home, they would just give her lots of sugars. She was admitted with big time DKA!!!!!!! I got her three days after ICU, and she still was quite out of it and not talking.

    I walked in...cracked a joke about myself in my intro and she laughed so hard! It was set...she and I were going to get along big time! And we did! Something about her just took a piece of my heart and kept it...something I have really never experience just meeting a patient, and certainly not as strongly as this one!

    I went home and did a ton of research on Graves Disease, and really got a feel from actual websites from people suffering from it! That was quite helpful.

    She and I got along so well, but sadly yesterday after I left...she tried to leave the hospital and almost made it (found two streets away). The MD d/c'd her one on one in her room, and I said ONLY if she was by the RN desk (she was out of site of the RN desk till we moved her). Crud!

    So today it was like starting all over. She wasn't speaking...not even to me. She was angry and doped up and sedated. I felt my heart fall out! I spent all day just giving her choices and letting her have her space, and I told the MD's to trust me and I would have her speaking again an in better spirits by EOS.

    After I talked with her, with her not responding...I let her know she was going to have her space to figure things out, but I would not stop caring for her and making sure she was safe! About an hour later she was talking to me again and in tears telling me I was the only person that listened to her, and she really trusted me out of everyone! I let her tell me her story and we both cried and talked about life... It seems she was always being TOLD what was going on, and had no choices or info really! I promised I would change that post haste after our cry and hug...and I DID!

    I talked to all her MD's and told them what was up, they understood and really involved her in her plan of care (and not her family...she is beyond of age to make choices for herself!). She really didn't get along with her mother who was caring for her so I contacted discharge to see if she had other options...and I asked but one favor of her...

    "Talk to the MD's so that they know what is going on and involve you...if you stay silent they have nothing to go on like I do since we talked! Please just go through the motions if you have to...but answer their questions...be honest for your own well being...and if there is any problems let the nurses I will have caring for you (which I scheduled personally) know...they will contact me!".

    She felt so much better, and all three MD's were stunned at the sudden change in 8 hours! I simply told them...she may have a medical problem...but the HUMAN problem was a bigger wall...I started tending to that...now lets work with both and keep this going!

    I got her diabetic lessons for her and she agreed for her mother too. I got her counseling outside of hospital when she is out. And the MD's listened to her! And for the first time in my career...I gave a heart felt hug to a honest and true PATIENT that trusted me with her life!

    Sometimes we forget what it is like to be the pt. The 'you will do this and you will do that' with little regard to 'what works for you, is this okay or shall we look at other options?"...That maybe when someone lashes out it is something more basic than medical...and needs tending to as much if not more for the patients total well being!


    Just thought I would share this story...it sure reminded me again...and my heart is so filled with joy and hope for this wonderful person that I tear up just thinking of her and my professional yet very human relationship!


    BRAVOumpiron: KUDOS, AND ALL THAT.
  4. by   dragonflyRN
    Wow...I need to work where you do. Something is wrong....if you can spend this amount of time with a patient, what is the ratio?
  5. by   shanLPN
    Thank you for sharing that story. She is a lucky patient to have a special nurse like you!
  6. by   prmenrs
    Good work, TRN! How nice to see your assessments and interventions really work, and to have cooperation from docs and other staff to make it happen for one patient! And to see her empowered towards her own health.
  7. by   jbjfan
    good for you! thanks for sharing your story! i am so excited to be a part of this profession! i am so fortunate. thanks for the inspiration! keep up the good work, you are truely an asset to your patients, your hospital and to the nursing profession! :roll
  8. by   scizzerin
    That was such an awesome story, it has solidified my feelings about going to nursing school. I was just finishing up on some really horrible homework, and this really lifted me, and I know I can get through this schooling. I wish you were my nurse.
  9. by   NurseLatteDNP
    I wish I can be as good nurse as you after I graduate. You are amazing.
  10. by   chadash
    I really loved reading this example of great nursing care. The human factor is almost always the first hurdle, isn't it?
    Some one once told me that people dont care how much you know, until they know how much you care.
  11. by   LoriAlabamaRN
    You honestly should write a book on therapeutic communication and the lost art of actually CARING for patients. How wonderful that you are a nurse.
  12. by   GatorRN
    What a great story! Thanks for sharing it. It is easy to forget sometimes that our sick pts are human, and want to be involved in their care, and treated with dignity. I've been a pts myself and always appreciated the nurses that actually showed that they cared, and that I wasn't seen as just another body in a bed. Keep up the good work! That pt will never forget how you helped her. You go girl!!
  13. by   RGN1
    Thanks for that wonderful story. It's a timely reminder about the forgotten side of nursing - the big "C" - CARING!!!

    I hope if I'm ever ill I get a nurse like you xxxxxxxxx
  14. by   DDRN4me
    great story...too often we are forced to treat the disease and the symptoms, NOT the PATIENT!!! Bravo for wading thru the maze that is healthcare to help the person!!

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