My Anatomy professor said...

  1. that the idea the bili lights do anything for jaundice is "hogwash"...

    comments?
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  2. 10 Comments

  3. by   santhony44
    Did he cite his sources???
  4. by   NRSKarenRN
    nurses were the ones to discover benefit of sunshine light in breaking down bilirubin... i remember my mom taking about aunt losing child to kernicterus as born on the farm and medical care scares in those days 1940's. my brother was transfused in 1957 which saved his life....he got lots of window time that march and april capturing sunshine.
    my premature son benefited from inpt unit...wish the wallaby unit was around 18yrs ago, came out 1 yr after birth.

    medlineplus medical encyclopedia: bili lights


    fundamentals of phototherapy for neonatal jaundice professionals must not be complacent about hyperbilirubinemia and its treatment. (free registration required)

    kernicterus & newborn jaundice
    Last edit by NRSKarenRN on Feb 13, '07
  5. by   TazziRN
    Your professor is full of hogwash. He may know his anatomy but he doesn't know his physiology.
  6. by   TiffyRN
    You'll likely find many more "odd" opinions out there with different professors. I've heard some strange opinions from a variety of instructors though the "soft" sciences tend to have more of those.

    NrsKarenRN is always quick and accurate in providing links and references; I sure appreciate her for that.

    I found a reference also. Please note that under treatment it discussed that photooxidation used to be thought to cause the drop in bilirubin but no longer; now there are other mechanisms at work. Perhaps your professor heard about photooxidation being disproven and latched onto that fact.

    http://www.emedicine.com/ped/topic1061.htm

    Those of us that work with infants know it works for a variety of reasons. One being when we got more powerful lights our kid started spending far fewer days under the lights. But that's anecdotal and your professor wouldn't be interested in that.
  7. by   RNsRWe
    It's always fun when someone who teaches strictly science tries to appear an expert in the medical field. Knowing anatomy in no way qualifies him to recommend for or against specific medical treatments.

    He should stick to identifying parts of the skeleton.
  8. by   txspadequeenRN
    This is the class I would love to be in!!!!:smiley_abWhat a fool!!!!
  9. by   prmenrs
    The difference between newborn jaundice and jaundice after the newborn period is direct vs indirect bilirubin. When you test a jaundiced infants blood, the results show virtually NO direct bilirubin. The indirect jaundice is elevated.

    Babies also do not have tea colored urine or acholic stools in typical newborn jaundice.

    They can develop jaundice related to hyperalimentation or congenital viral infections and anatomic issues related to the biliary tract. If you expose those infants to ultraviolet lights, they turn a very UNlovely shade of bronze. Not a desirable outcome.

    So--the prof is right, but not when discussing newborn jaundice.
  10. by   Jules A
    Quote from prmenrs
    The difference between newborn jaundice and jaundice after the newborn period is direct vs indirect bilirubin. When you test a jaundiced infants blood, the results show virtually NO direct bilirubin. The indirect jaundice is elevated.

    Babies also do not have tea colored urine or acholic stools in typical newborn jaundice.

    They can develop jaundice related to hyperalimentation or congenital viral infections and anatomic issues related to the biliary tract. If you expose those infants to ultraviolet lights, they turn a very UNlovely shade of bronze. Not a desirable outcome.

    So--the prof is right, but not when discussing newborn jaundice.
    Thats what I was thinking. If I understand correctly the research I've read about adult dogs with icterus doesn't support the use of lights either.
  11. by   Ado Annie
    Thanks for the comments and links. I always like to learn a little more, and was just really curious about what he said.
  12. by   JaxiaKiley
    It's always frustrating when profs have non-standard opinions and won't cite sources.

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