Is there REALLY a nursing shortage? - page 8

This is an interesting article guys/gals... Here's the letter I wrote to the President, Vice-President, U.S. Congress Rep. and Senator: "I'm an R.N. and I recently started working as an agency... Read More

  1. by   Simplepleasures
    Quote from p_rn
    shortage: the property of being an amount by which something is less than expected or required.

    i think there is a shortage of people who will work at what is at best a nebulous expectation/definition of the job.

    and yes read your journals, that nurse should have, should have, should have should have..........

    that nurse left nursing, and it tears her heart out, because she *is* a nurse.
    oh , now you really have made me cry, its me you are talking about, and probaly quite a few other "beaten down" nurses, just like me who also have left nursing, the noble profession.
  2. by   Simplepleasures
    Quote from all4schwa
    if there wasn't a shortage would hospitals be paying for nurses in other countries to uproot and come work here?
    Have you considered that the hospitals/nursing homes want foreign nurses because they will work cheap and wont make waves?
  3. by   BSNtobe2009
    I went on the nursing website of one state and they had 126 nurses in ONE MONTH to get their licenses either revoked or suspended.

    No wonder the hospitals are short.
  4. by   Mulan
    Quote from mariedoreen
    I would have happily taken less money per hour (blasphemy around here I know) for saner working conditions.
    I heartily agree.
  5. by   nightbychoice
    Hmmmmm I read this thread and went from laughing to crying.....and mostly agreeing the whole way.
    I believe after being in 3 different states and landing in the float pool now..
    that nurses everywhere are stressed to the max.Most of us got into this profession because we are the "helper" type personality.HOWEVER, thanks to JCAHO and the state certifications....we now have mountains of paperwork to lessen our already short time with our patients.Add this to the ever increasing amounts of meds we need to give patients and I myself find myself sitting in front of a computer A LOT. I hate that....if I wanted to bond with my computer I would have gone to Tech school NOT nursing school.
    The hospital I am at now....seniority on the M/S floor=3 years!! Helloooo will someone wake up and smell the coffee....
    Not sure what the answer is here...so many factors of causation...I am seriously considering going to work at Subway and here is why:

    #1--I can be around hot buns all day.
    #2--I can play with meat all day.
    #3--I get my choice of 6 inch or 12 inch.
    #4--They will call me a "Sandwich Artist".

    XANAX LICKS AT NURSE'S STATIONS SHOULD BE MANDITORY!
  6. by   Hellllllo Nurse
    Quote from mariedoreen
    It wasn't about the money for me. It was about too many patients and not enough support for a new grad. I would have happily taken less money per hour (blasphemy around here I know) for saner working conditions. I'll keep looking for a position in nursing that doesn't push me to the depths of depression, but if I don't find it so be it. I will not sacrifice my mental and physical health for the working conditions that so many nurses are subjected to. Life is way too short and there is no amount of money they could pay me that would make me want to do that.
    ITA, only it's not just the new grads who don't get enough support, it's the seasoned nurses, as well.
  7. by   Madame Poppy Pomfrey
    Quote from BSNtobe2009
    I went on the nursing website of one state and they had 126 nurses in ONE MONTH to get their licenses either revoked or suspended.

    No wonder the hospitals are short.
    BSNtobe2009, YIKES! What state was that? Did they list the reasons why? I am starting to get the impression and that it would be real easy to have your license revoked or suspended due to the crazy conditions that nurses have to work under.
    I live in PA, and my license was issued at the end Oct. 06 and since then 870 new licenses have been issued.
  8. by   BrnEyedGirl
    Quote from ingelein
    .State and even better, Federal mandated nurse patient ratios may help aleviate this phenomenon, IF the healthcare facilities will be severly punished when they try to circumvent mandated ratios,by some of their devious methods, they seem to be so good at.
    From your mouth to God's ears!!!!!
  9. by   OC_An Khe
    After reading numerous threads on this topic and suggestions on how to fix the problem I've reached a simple conclusion. RN would stay at the bedside if they were given the appropriate resources to care for their patients and that the number of patients they are required to care for was based on research evidence. To date that would give everyone the much toted 4:1 ratio on med surg. The only places I know that mandate this type of ratio are California and some Australian provinces or by uniojn contract elsewhere. All of these entities anedotically report less to no shortage or at least an increase in number of licensed RNs then before the legal mandate.
    Gee does that mean letting nurses truly practise the profession of nursing releive the shortage and lack of adequate staff that so many but not all areas report. I think so.
  10. by   Freedom42
    Quote from all4schwa
    if there wasn't a shortage would hospitals be paying for nurses in other countries to uproot and come work here?
    As long as the health-care industry is allowed to rely on foreign countries to supply nurses in large numbers, nurses' wages will remain suppressed and working conditions will not improve. Hospitals don't have to make changes when there's someone else willing to do your job for less.

    You're probably too young to remember the teacher shortage of the seventies and eighties. When that happened, schools didn't turn to foreign countries to supply teachers. They increased wages dramatically. End of teacher shortage.

    Government figures show that we've got 400,000 licensed nurses in this country who've left the profession. Why don't hospitals try to lure them back before turning to the Philippines?
  11. by   pjs91n
    I live in NJ and find that where there is not a shortage,there are a few specialities that could use help. I used towork med/surg. As aLPN I traveled for a while and came back home. If they would let seasoned nurses back into the hospitals it would ease the load for the RN's. The field does not appreciate LPN's and that makes for a shortage in certain areas.
  12. by   BSNtobe2009
    Quote from Madame Poppy Pomfrey
    BSNtobe2009, YIKES! What state was that? Did they list the reasons why? I am starting to get the impression and that it would be real easy to have your license revoked or suspended due to the crazy conditions that nurses have to work under.
    I live in PA, and my license was issued at the end Oct. 06 and since then 870 new licenses have been issued.
    Virginia....the vast majority of them were controlled substance violations, failure to comply with education for substance abuse (reason ENOUGH for hospitals to do drug testing often and frequently), arrests for other things not reported to the BON. There wasn't alot of procedure....there was one where a nurse was suspended because she refused to do attend to a full CODE patient, but again, I was shocked at the substance abuse cases.
  13. by   BSNtobe2009
    Quote from Freedom42
    As long as the health-care industry is allowed to rely on foreign countries to supply nurses in large numbers, nurses' wages will remain suppressed and working conditions will not improve. Hospitals don't have to make changes when there's someone else willing to do your job for less.

    You're probably too young to remember the teacher shortage of the seventies and eighties. When that happened, schools didn't turn to foreign countries to supply teachers. They increased wages dramatically. End of teacher shortage.

    Government figures show that we've got 400,000 licensed nurses in this country who've left the profession. Why don't hospitals try to lure them back before turning to the Philippines?
    That depends on what state you live in. North Carolina is a state where there is a critical shortgage of teachers. You don't even have to have a teaching degree to teach high school here anymore....you just have to have a degree in ANYTHING as long as it's a 4-year, and then they pay for you to go back and get your teaching certificate within 5 years.

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