Is swearing normal??

  1. Ive been in the hospital about 7 times in my adult life and always try to be a gracious patient.I always say thank-you ,dont make a fuss if a nurse has to poke me a dozen times to get an IV inserted(my veins are small and this always happens)try not to call unless necessary,ect.So I was SHOCKED when my daughters,husband,ect told me that when im first coming out of anestesia(sp?) that I have been known to be very different.According to them im grouchy and even swear.I honestly dont remember this at all,and all my nurses seem to like me alright.I feel really bad about this. Do other patients do this when waking up??
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  2. 21 Comments

  3. by   Spidey's mom
    Oh, I thought you meant in general is swearing normal? :chuckle In that case I would say yes but is it nice? No. I occasionally let go with a minor swear word but don't like the casual way swearing has entered into general conversation. Especially the "F" word used as an adjective, verb, noun, pronoun, etc. As my old granny used to say "Swearing is ignorance made audible".

    Now as to your situation . . . yessirree! It happens. Everyone understands this is not under the patient's control.

    steph
  4. by   KaroSnowQueen
    Oh yes I usually in "real life" try to be pleasant and polite and please and thank you and yes mam no mam sort of person.
    Coming out of surgery, it's "I WANT A G--D--- Coke and get this M--F--ing thing off my face! Blankety blank blank!" I was so humiliated later when I remembered this, and I did remember it unfortunately!!!!!! :uhoh21:
  5. by   CHATSDALE
    I Had A Tia A Couple Of Years Ago And My Dtrs Are Still Laughting About How I Cursed Ed People.....thank Goodness It Is Erased From My Memories
  6. by   kimburlynn
    I had my wisdom teeth removed several years ago and when I went in for my follow up I heard a girl in the next room howling and barking.I was so shocked and I guess my Dr. noticed because he laughed and said ALOT of the patients do that kind of thing while under.I felt to embarrased:imbar to ask if that included me.
  7. by   suzy253
    oh yeah..i remember waking up from surgery after being operated for endometriosis way back when. I was cursing our my doctor left and right. :chuckle
  8. by   jyoung1950
    I agree. Although I've found myself saying sh!t and dammit a little too much lately and not even realizing it as time goes on and would like to change that lazy habit.

    I save the "F" word for very special occasions and when others do hear me say it, they know I am angry - very angry.

    I worked with one aid who is 63 and when she has to swear, she spells the words!

    Then there are the younger ones (females) here and I don't exaggerate when I say that they literally cannot start and finish a sentence without an "F'in" this and "F'in" that sprinkled throughout. If someone were to land here from another planet, they'd think that most English words began with the letters "f***in."

    It doesn't anger me so much as it does sadden me that these young women have been sold a bill of goods from those that think that if you talk this way, you are equal to and can act the same as men. And they wonder why the only men they can attract are the type that use them till another willing female crosses their path.





    Quote from stevielynn
    Oh, I thought you meant in general is swearing normal? :chuckle In that case I would say yes but is it nice? No. I occasionally let go with a minor swear word but don't like the casual way swearing has entered into general conversation. Especially the "F" word used as an adjective, verb, noun, pronoun, etc. As my old granny used to say "Swearing is ignorance made audible".

    Now as to your situation . . . yessirree! It happens. Everyone understands this is not under the patient's control.

    steph
  9. by   kids
    I wish all I did was swear when coming out of anesthetic.
    I hit and from what I have been told not just little slaps, I mean full on closed fist punches.:imbar

    A nurse who did one of my pre-surgical interviews helped me a great deal.
    I always warn everyone of my history, she shared that she had the same problem until she learned to communicate she was inpain while semi-concious.
    For me, when coming out of anesthesia the only time I know I hurt is when the PACU nurses wake me for assessments. I did some mental preparing for that surgery and still remember chanting "ow, ow, ow, ow" and being asked if I was in pain and (I assume) getting drugs. I still chant when waking up and I haven't slugged a PACU nurse since. I have been told I pull off my O2 and slap at the hands putting it back in my nose (I hate cannulas, give me a mask any day).
  10. by   rjflyn
    I can remember a pt we gave versed to as a pretreatment prior to cardioversion for v-tach. He was awake- barley but when we hit him with the energy is comment was 'you mother f***ers'. WHen he was awake he recalled nothing but thanked us as he felt a whole lot better.


    Rj
  11. by   bagladyrn
    Last time I had surgery on my foot, under the influence of Versed, I apparently complained bitterly to the anesthesiologist the whole time about making a night nurse work all night NPO without my "caffeine fix". I must have been quite strident as when I woke up just outside the OR doors, he was standing there with a large cup of coffee fixed just the way I like it!
  12. by   Still Riding
    I'm know to even swear a little when waking up from a regular sleep (I'm not a morning person at all) I'm know to swear a little, but i don't remember it. So when i wake up from anesthesia it is not a pretty thing, I also wasn't a very nice person when i had a major concussion.

    I'm not a person who swears when I'm fully awake, and I feel bad for whoever is around me when I'm waking up. I've been woking at keeping my mouth shut when waking up, from any kinda sleep. but i think I am an extreme.

    SR
  13. by   Dr. Gonzo
    I noticed younger female patients tend to curse more dont know why.
  14. by   FROGGYLEGS
    I've never worked in surgery, but I do recall some interesting events with people waking up when I was doing clinical rotations.

    We had this one young man to wake up and he looked to be pretty groggy from the medicine still. He must've thought he was out drinking with his buddies. I remember him talking about all the hotties. He kept whispering to the doctor about the hotties and how they had to hurry up so they could get back to this local bar before the hotties got away. Everything he said had something to do with that club and he just whispered it and smiled like he were talking to his best friends. It was a hoot.

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