I want this job, BUT......

  1. It is only 30 hours a week.

    But it sounds perfect for me.....It is working as a diabetic educator at a very busy clinic (a block away from my apartment). They will put me throught the training to get certified as a diabetic counselor. Oh, and the hours are to die for....M-F from 9-3. No work to take home, and I'd say it is pretty much stress free....at least compared to bedside nursing. Another downside? The pay sucks. But I will say, I am READY for change and ready to sacrafice. I have reached BEDSIDE BURN OUT and I feel like if I keep this up, I am going to have a stroke or MI at a very young age....and soon.

    I wonder what I can do to supplement my income without working in a hospital or nursing home....? Ideally I would love to instruct Yoga or low-impact aerobics at night, but I don't have the certificates or training to do that, and getting certified takes a lot of time (at least a year). I would love to find something nurse-related, but again, I don't want to work in a hospital ir nursing home.

    Any ideas?
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  2. 16 Comments

  3. by   Hellllllo Nurse
    No ideas for regularly supplementing your income, but this job sounds like a dream. Sounds like something I'd love.

    One small way I can think of to make money is to clean out your closets and sell stuff on eBay, or a flea mkt. Since your new job is only 30 hrs, and doesn't sound like you will have to bust your butt like most jobs require, maybe you will have the energy to clean out your closets and man a flea mkt booth a few times.

    I've done these things when taking a break between travel contracts.
  4. by   EmmaG
    Ya know, about the ebay thing...

    While my daughter was in college, she wanted to be able to stay at home as much as possible with her baby, so she would go to garage sales in the 'upscale' part of town and buy top of the line kids clothes and toys, maternity clothes, that sort of thing (most everything she bought was mother / child related). She would get this stuff for next to nothing then sell it on Ebay. The maternity and child items sell so well on there because of the expense of buying it new when it's only used for a relatively short period of time. She was careful to choose only quality stuff, and to photograph the items in a very professional manner. She also gave very detailed descriptions of the items (she has excellent writing skills--- she could have worked in PR lol).

    She made a killing. With very little time or money invested, she was clearing at least $500 a month, often much more than that. She told me it wasn't considered taxable income. Although she did check with a tax professional on this, I'd recommend anyone going this route to do so on their own rather than take my word for it.
    Last edit by EmmaG on Nov 4, '07
  5. by   bill4745
    If your stress level drops because of the new job, would that enable you to do one agency shift a week in a hospital or nursing home?

    She told me it wasn't considered taxable income
    As a former business owner, anything she cleared is taxable. She is operating a business and probably needs a license as well.
  6. by   Conrad283
    Try working per-diem somewhere or maybe home care, you could get in touch with the local hospice or VNA for someone who is in need of private duty.
  7. by   nurz2be
    Quote from raindrop
    It is only 30 hours a week.

    But it sounds perfect for me.....It is working as a diabetic educator at a very busy clinic (a block away from my apartment). They will put me throught the training to get certified as a diabetic counselor. Oh, and the hours are to die for....M-F from 9-3. No work to take home, and I'd say it is pretty much stress free....at least compared to bedside nursing. Another downside? The pay sucks. But I will say, I am READY for change and ready to sacrafice. I have reached BEDSIDE BURN OUT and I feel like if I keep this up, I am going to have a stroke or MI at a very young age....and soon.

    I wonder what I can do to supplement my income without working in a hospital or nursing home....? Ideally I would love to instruct Yoga or low-impact aerobics at night, but I don't have the certificates or training to do that, and getting certified takes a lot of time (at least a year). I would love to find something nurse-related, but again, I don't want to work in a hospital ir nursing home.

    Any ideas?
    Try oncall RN service through hospice or home care. My friend does this weekend exclusives and she gets almost 40 an hour just for on call status. She rarely goes out and when she does it is most of the time for a med check and is only gone a few hours the entire weekend.
  8. by   llg
    The job sounds wonderful. I would be tempted to "take it while you got the chance" and worry about the money later. You might not get another opportunity like this.

    Once your stress level goes down, you might be able to handle the ocassional shift at per diem or agency rates to augment your income. You also might be able to find other opportunities to teach (e.g. CPR or diabetes-related content) at another facility or organization (Red Cross? etc.) in the evening a few times per month.
  9. by   EmmaG
    Quote from bill4745
    If your stress level drops because of the new job, would that enable you to do one agency shift a week in a hospital or nursing home?


    As a former business owner, anything she cleared is taxable. She is operating a business and probably needs a license as well.
    That makes sense to me, but so did the advice of the tax person she consulted lol. Me... I'm totally lost in these matters.
  10. by   NurseCard
    If I had a job like that, I'd work at Starbucks a couple of evenings a week. :spin: I am not kidding; I would LOVE to have a part time job at Starbucks. Right now though, I just don't have the time or energy.

    I can see myself being in your shoes, because I would love so much to have a job as a school nurse one of these days. What I would do is either have a little part time job like the one I mentioned above =), or maybe work PRN at the hospital and maybe work a couple of shifts every other weekend. That wouldn't be so bad. There's always the problem of getting cancelled when you are PRN though.
  11. by   angel337
    i think it is really sad that the "nice" nursing jobs have crappy pay. in my opinion whether you are sitting at a desk or busting your butt at the hospital, your pay should not be drastically different. give or take a dollar or two, but usually it is like a $5-8/hr difference. i found many "nice" jobs when i was looking at one time and the pay was insulting. a 30 hour a week job is nice, and if you can adjust your income/expenses to accomodate that..go for it. i think once you have been in your new job for a while it will make doing bedside nursing prn alot easier because you aren't doing it all the time any more. good luck with your decision.
  12. by   ebear
    Raindrop,
    DO NOT pass up this job opportunity!! These kinds of jobs are scarce!! I'm sure you can find other ways to supplement your income. Your sanity is well worth the effort!!
    ebear
  13. by   superRN39
    Go for it!!!
  14. by   llg
    Quote from angel337
    i think it is really sad that the "nice" nursing jobs have crappy pay. in my opinion whether you are sitting at a desk or busting your butt at the hospital, your pay should not be drastically different. give or take a dollar or two, but usually it is like a $5-8/hr difference. i found many "nice" jobs when i was looking at one time and the pay was insulting. a 30 hour a week job is nice, and if you can adjust your income/expenses to accomodate that..go for it. i think once you have been in your new job for a while it will make doing bedside nursing prn alot easier because you aren't doing it all the time any more. good luck with your decision.
    Those nurses working the "less popular" jobs deserve significantly extra pay -- not just an extra dollar or two. Those jobs are less popular because they are more stressful, involve difficult work hours, more responsibility, more risk, etc. There are usually very good reasons for the extra pay.

    In most cases, it's a simple matter of supply and demand.

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