I got fired while being on orientation at a hospital for just 1 week. Why did this happen? - page 4

So I am seeking some advice as to why this occurred and am still pondering on what could have I done wrong for this to have such a bad ending. After searching and searching years and years for a... Read More

  1. by   chacha82
    My understanding is that per diem and wage staff can be let go "easier" than full-time staff. I am sorry this happened to you - I agree with the other posters. Ask for an exit interview, other than that all you can do is wait for the letter.
  2. by   Mavrick
    Quote from KatieMI
    The truth may or may not have anything to do with that phone call, or nature of that call, or anything the OP did or didn't. The manager very well might just find someone wishing to work full time and knowing how to read ECGs that very day and therefore not need the PRN position any more.
    This was my first thought.

    Seriously, though, a tele nurse that can't read rhythm strips is useless. Why would they want to hang on to someone who is unqualified for the position when a qualified applicant fell into their laps.

    I can't believe a misplaced personal phone call was OP's undoing but a lesson learned. Turn off your phone while at work if you can't control yourself to not answer it.
  3. by   iluvivt
    The reality is we all take personal phone calls at work because we are human,have lives and things happen.You must ,however, be very discreet about it because many hospitals do not like it or allow it.It does seem extreme to fire you though!
  4. by   dream'n
    I doubt your phone call had anything to do with losing the PRN position. It's probably something totally unrelated, like a bad reference that came in at the last minute or a credit check that raised flags. Could you have failed the drug screening? Who knows, maybe the position itself became a casualty of the unit budget? Don't be hard on yourself. Just wait for the letter to get your answers.
  5. by   Davey Do
    Quote from Emergent
    It may seem unconceivable to the younger generation , but it is possible to survive without a cell phone on one's person at all times.
    Can I hear an Amen?

    ​AMEN!

    cut-the-cord-
  6. by   blondy2061h
    Quote from iluvivt
    The reality is we all take personal phone calls at work because we are human,have lives and things happen.You must ,however, be very discreet about it because many hospitals do not like it or allow it.It does seem extreme to fire you though!
    A lot of people do, but most people manage to get through the first week not talking to their lawyer on the clock during class.
  7. by   BostonFNP
    Quote from Strugaaa4eva
    I explained what had occurred and I didn't realize that 5 days later I was going to be reprimanded for that. I received a call from the unit manager I was supposed to work at stating that I was technically supposed to come this weekend for my first day of clinical orientation (I was hired as a per diem nurse) she told me that I don't need to come.
    If I am following this correctly, it wasn't until 5 days later you were told not to come in? What, out of curiosity, makes you think it was the phone call that 5 days later resulted in your discharge?

    I'd think something came up on a CORI check or reference call or such that was more immediate to your being discharged....
  8. by   Ben_Dover
    Quote from Strugaaa4eva
    So I am seeking some advice as to why this occurred and am still pondering on what could have I done wrong for this to have such a bad ending. After searching and searching years and years for a hospital job (I've always worked in subacute rehab settings) and have been craving a hospital job for nearly 5 years as it will be 5 years this coming May that I graduated from nursing school. Long story short, I was hired by a local hospital and all was going well with the first week of orientation. I mean, c'mon it was only classroom work and I passed all the required exams such as the IV and medication administration. I had to take a personal call during the last 1/2 hour of our last day of class and when I returned the nurse educator was saying how I shouldn't give her a heart attack next time about not telling her where I was. I explained what had occurred and I didn't realize that 5 days later I was going to be reprimanded for that. I received a call from the unit manager I was supposed to work at stating that I was technically supposed to come this weekend for my first day of clinical orientation (I was hired as a per diem nurse) she told me that I don't need to come. Refusing to provide further information, when I asked her if the position was terminated she said "yeah kinda, you'll get a letter in the mail explaining everything." I'm really baffled about this? I seriously didn't do anything and am unsure why did this lead up to here?

    Please take note, only constructive comments will be accepted otherwise demeaning, ridiculing words will be flagged. I just need to get some advice as to why this happened and if it is something usual?
    I highlighted and underlined the main things that pretty much says it all. If you will just re-read and keep reading your initial post, you basically answered your own question.

    Also, I highlighted and underlined the things that is very concerning to me, that may say a lot about you, and why this time, "I" think they "terminated you."

    Honestly, when I first saw the heading, I thought, this was another troll or a joke so I kept on flipping the pages and saw your responses and felt the sincerity in you. But then again this is the internet. Anyways. My Spill

    Everyone pretty much told you that the main reason (we think) they got you was the phone call but for 30 minutes! Oh My GERD! "1/2 Hour" is a lunch break for most of us in the nursing world!

    "I mean, c'mon it was only classroom work" - This Says A Lot About You, that was work related, most of your colleagues were in that room while you were out talking to your lawyer.

    Since you pretty much informed the whole world of what exactly happened during your first week of orientation (very crucial time by the way). Can you please tell us as to why you were terminated once you received the mail from HR, this will tell and help us if our advices or hunches were right.

    Lesson Learned For ALL Nurses not just for you , Stugaaa4eva, NO PERSONAL PHONE CALLS FOR "30 MINUTES" ON COMPANY TIME.
    Last edit by Ben_Dover on Mar 8 : Reason: Reiterating : NO PERSONAL CALLS ON COMP. TIME
  9. by   CrunchRN
    I think there is a whole lot of speculation here both by the OP and those responding.

    I would wait for the later and see what they say. If they don't specify I would request info from HR.

    For your own sanity you need to know. I know I would be driving myself crazy over it without knowing their motives.

    Please follow up and let us know. I will be wondering. My speculation is that there was some miscommunication somewhere that led to this outcome.
  10. by   blondy2061h
    Going back to the "it's only classroom work" comment:

    You do realize that in the classroom is when you'll learn key company policies that will protect you legally during your career, and help you get the most out of your career, along with major resources that will improve your ability to care for nurses for years to come, right?
  11. by   Amethya
    I'm not a nurse, but a CMA. I quit/fired my first job and I had a second job that lasted only a week and I learned from experience that no matter what job you get, it's NEVER permanent. That's why you gotta be on your toes and make sure you do well always, because if you piss off the wrong person or do the wrong thing, it's bye-bye job. You gotta be perfect than perfect! That's what I learned from working at a clinic job.

    I thankfully found a job at a school, and it's more laid back than at a clinic or hospital, because there they are always up your butt about something, so it's stressful. I felt bad the same way, but then after a while of looking for work and thinking, I saw it was mostly my fault for being too laid back in these types of jobs and I gotta be more professional at work. So that's what I did, but after 7 months here, I found that it's laid back, but I gotta still be on my toes. I guess I'm still traumatic on that.
  12. by   Extra Pickles
    Quote from KatieMI
    Exit interview would be useless spending of time, because the OP would be given generic politically correct lie of being "not a good fit" or her mistake (yes, mistake it was) of taking that call would be blown into size of a crime against entire humankind. To know the truth, the manager and/or HR will have to be forced to tell it; I am afraid that a Court's order to testify under oath wouldn't be enough to do that.
    I beg to differ, but an exit interview can be a very useful expense of time! She has no way of knowing at this moment if she'll get a generic wishy-washy response like "you weren't a good fit", but she also doesn't know if she'll get good feedback, constructive criticism which DOES happen and if she pays attention to that she'll hopefully be able to change something so that she doesn't get fired again if she gets lucky enough to get another acute care spot. Not all exit interviews are generic nonsense, sometimes they are great tools. I know because I sat in on one and told the new hire personally what was going wrong with her that made me recommend to not continue the orientation! Did she listen and learn I have no idea but I felt that I did her justice by telling her what the problems were and they were fixable, probably, but they weren't going to be fixed on our dime if you know what I mean.
  13. by   Extra Pickles
    Quote from BostonFNP
    If I am following this correctly, it wasn't until 5 days later you were told not to come in? What, out of curiosity, makes you think it was the phone call that 5 days later resulted in your discharge?

    I'd think something came up on a CORI check or reference call or such that was more immediate to your being discharged....
    Something isn't adding up right in the OP's posts because the first time through she said it was the last half hour of the LAST day that week, but then said she found out five days later, which implies it happened on the first day that week. It seems that if this happened on the last half hour of the last day of the classroom portion then there was probably more that wasn't going on well and that might have been the last straw. I'm only guessing because the only one who knows the truth (if the OP doesn't) is the administration at that hospital, which is why she needs to go to an exit interview if they are willing to hold one.

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