I don't get the MA deal... - page 2

Was at my kid's school today and asked the chick in the nurse's office if she is a "nurse." She said yes--I asked what degree she had (just wondering if she was an LPN or RN as I am thinking about... Read More

  1. by   Sheri257
    Docs hire MA's because they're too cheap to hire RN's.

    How many times have I heard "I do everything an RN does except IV's ... I just don't want to go through the hassle of school."

    If MA's really could do the same things as RN's they wouldn't pay us more money ... duh.

    I'm sorry but people who say this are idiots. I realize that MA's who need to call themselves nurses have a massive inferiority complex but enough already!

    :typing
    Last edit by Sheri257 on Nov 8, '06
  2. by   DutchgirlRN
    Quote from lizz
    Docs hire MA's because they're too cheap to hire RN's.

    How many times have I heard "I do everything an RN does except IV's ... I just don't want to go through the hassle of school."

    If MA's really could do the same things as RN's they wouldn't pay us more money ... duh.

    I'm sorry but people who say this are idiots. I realize that MA's who need to call themselves nurses have a massive inferiority complex but enough already!

    :typing
    I had a doctor once say to me "I have an office full of MA's because I can't afford to pay an RN $40/hr". I said "I'll give you a good deal, I'll work for $30/hr". He walked off without a reply!
  3. by   JentheRN05
    My place of employment is about to hire an MA. I have only worked with 2 MA's before and one passed herself off as a nurse. ALL THE TIME. It upset me an awful lot and I'm afraid that I will pass this off onto the new MA. Any ideas on how to approach this tactfully to make sure she doesn't pass herself off to the residents as a nurse (which she's not). I would love to hear ideas. I plan to introduce her as a medical assistant. But what's to stop her from leading them to believe she is as qualified as I am? I would love some ideas.
  4. by   trh0630
    Doctor's offices should have name tags with MA, LPN, or RN on them. Ma's or anyone else for that matter, can't call themselves nurses unless the office is okay with it, and a lot of them are. It's easier to call them all 'Nurses' than to try to explain who is, and who isn't.
  5. by   txspadequeenRN
    This has nothing to do with the office being ok with it. It is illegal to present yourself as a nurse if you are not one PERIOD! There is a big difference in skills and education between a MA and Nurse . I know I have been both.

    Quote from trh0630
    Doctor's offices should have name tags with MA, LPN, or RN on them. Ma's or anyone else for that matter, can't call themselves nurses unless the office is okay with it, and a lot of them are. It's easier to call them all 'Nurses' than to try to explain who is, and who isn't.
  6. by   gauge14iv
    Quote from txspadequeen921
    This has nothing to do with the office being ok with it. It is illegal to present yourself as a nurse if you are not one PERIOD! There is a big difference in skills and education between a MA and Nurse . I know I have been both.
    That actually depends on the law in the state you live in. In Texas is it illegal. Some states do not yet have protected titles in their occupational code.
  7. by   pagandeva2000
    Quote from JentheRN05
    My place of employment is about to hire an MA. I have only worked with 2 MA's before and one passed herself off as a nurse. ALL THE TIME. It upset me an awful lot and I'm afraid that I will pass this off onto the new MA. Any ideas on how to approach this tactfully to make sure she doesn't pass herself off to the residents as a nurse (which she's not). I would love to hear ideas. I plan to introduce her as a medical assistant. But what's to stop her from leading them to believe she is as qualified as I am? I would love some ideas.
    Another poster mentioned ID badges...that is not a bad idea, but do not use initials, use the entire name of the title...Registered/Certified Medical Assistant, Registered/Practical Nurse, etc... no RMA, CMA, RN...they are too close together to make a difference. And, if you were part of the interviewing process, or while you are orienting her, explain the 'rationale' of WHY she can't pass herself off as one. This was an ongoing thread for a while, and as an LPN, I can understand why it is an annoyance to a nurse. However, I think that patients have a hard time understanding what a medical assistant is...they see a person wearing a uniform, possibly medicating them and teaching them, and they believe that it is a nurse. Television shows have them...Marcus Welby had Consuelo (I think that I made a mistake in spelling), Becker, the crabby physician played by Ted Danson had one, and to me, those are probably medical assistants as well. But, what I am saying is that these people were introduced to television as nurses, and this is what the public believes.

    I work in Coumadin CLinic with a physician's assistant. Every patient calls him Dr. We just stopped correcting them, because it would extend to at least a 1/2 hour explanation to well over 40 people what a physician's assistant actually is. In our Endocrine CLinic, we have a nurse practitioner who is called Dr. by the patients in spite of her correcting them time after time. Due to simplicity, I don't see this trend changing, unfortunately, however, the actual practitioner should not call themselves what they are not, or overstep their boundaries by doing things out of their scope of practice.
  8. by   loriannlpn
    Quote from pagandeva2000
    Another poster mentioned ID badges...that is not a bad idea, but do not use initials, use the entire name of the title...Registered/Certified Medical Assistant, Registered/Practical Nurse, etc... no RMA, CMA, RN...they are too close together to make a difference. And, if you were part of the interviewing process, or while you are orienting her, explain the 'rationale' of WHY she can't pass herself off as one. This was an ongoing thread for a while, and as an LPN, I can understand why it is an annoyance to a nurse. However, I think that patients have a hard time understanding what a medical assistant is...they see a person wearing a uniform, possibly medicating them and teaching them, and they believe that it is a nurse. Television shows have them...Marcus Welby had Consuelo (I think that I made a mistake in spelling), Becker, the crabby physician played by Ted Danson had one, and to me, those are probably medical assistants as well. But, what I am saying is that these people were introduced to television as nurses, and this is what the public believes.

    I work in Coumadin CLinic with a physician's assistant. Every patient calls him Dr. We just stopped correcting them, because it would extend to at least a 1/2 hour explanation to well over 40 people what a physician's assistant actually is. In our Endocrine CLinic, we have a nurse practitioner who is called Dr. by the patients in spite of her correcting them time after time. Due to simplicity, I don't see this trend changing, unfortunately, however, the actual practitioner should not call themselves what they are not, or overstep their boundaries by doing things out of their scope of practice.


    I feel it would be very confusing for someone in a hospital setting to distinguish between RN, LPN, Tech... In the hospitals in my region, they are having the RN's wear a RED badge a little longer in length than the photo ID, it says RN.

    A patients sister said that her mother was in MEDICAL school. I said really? What field is she going to go into, pt replied a MEDICAL ASSISTANT! I actually had to think a minute to be sure I understood that I heard what I heard.


    My providers office also hires an abundance of MA's. I needed to have a medication refilled and received a cell phone call from a women that identified herself as Dr"s nurse. She asked what my allergies where and If I was on any other medication. ( my file was in another office) I told her I take one 0.125 mcg of levothyroxine q morning..... She asked me how to spell levothyroxine
  9. by   Spidey's mom
    My neurologist takes his own vital signs because he see no real reason to hire an RN, LVN or even a medical assistant to do something he can do himself. He gives no injections, does no procedures, etc.

    I am always surprised when I see a physician take a blood pressure - it does my heart good. Last week my husband's doc retook his bp.

    steph
  10. by   HappyNurse2005
    This has been gone over a zillion times on this site.

    We all know ma's aren't nurses, aren't anywhere near being a nurse, and even if they think they are "just like a nurse" they aren't.
  11. by   RNinJune2007
    Quote from ann945n
    I went into my doctors office to get some vaccinations i need and was told the nurse would be doing it. while talking with her making small talk (along she is playing nurse) and right as she is sticking me i ask her if she is a LPN or RN, oh no she was a MA. i was soooo mad! had i known i wouldnt have let her do it, but thats just me. You aint no Nurse if your a MA period.

    Sorry, but this is offensive. While I realize that you may have felt deceived, by them telling you it would be a nurse, that doesn't seem like the reason that you are mad.

    MA's are highly qualified to give injections. I know many WONDERFUL MA's who are far more clinically experienced that some nurses I know, and one in particular is the most wonderful blood-drawer ever... 10x better than ANY nurse I've had.

    Just because someone is not an RN does not mean that they are not qualified to do clinical tasks... most MA programs are 2 years. (Not to say it is anything like Nursing school!)

    They learn the tasks, and like someone else said, they don't NECESSARILY get the "WHY'S," but they do work under a nurse. In simple tasks such as immunizations, Vitals, Caths, etc, they can be more than qualified...

    Completely aside, IF the reason you were upset is that you were told it would be a nurse and she wasn't, then I understand.
    If it is that they are "JUST" an MA, I feel that is simply ignorant.
    Last edit by RNinJune2007 on Nov 9, '06
  12. by   TheCommuter
    Quote from loriannlpn
    A patients sister said that her mother was in MEDICAL school. I said really? What field is she going to go into, pt replied a MEDICAL ASSISTANT! I actually had to think a minute to be sure I understood that I heard what I heard.
    I completed a 4-month medical assistant program 6 years ago (though I have never worked as an MA).

    One of my classmates, a middle-aged lady who was changing careers, had loudly complained that, "We should be paid more money. After all, we're completing medical school."

    Sorry, but there's a hell of a difference between a 4-month MA program and the many years of undergraduate education, medical school and internships that physicians undergo.
  13. by   AfloydRN
    HUGE diference between 4 years of nursing school and clinicals to an MA certificate. I would be embarrased to LIE about my profession. If you truly deem yourself a nurse- become one.

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