How do you really feel about 5-star rooms? - page 5

Our hospital has new "5-star" rooms (you know with a chef, etc.) What is your reaction to this type of thing and "how does it make you feel"? I'd really like to know what other nurses think about... Read More

  1. by   llg
    I have taken care of nice people who happened to be rich and obnoxios people who happened to be rich.

    I have taken care of nice people who happened to be poor and obnoxios people who happened to be poor.

    The question is NOT whether or not you like taking care of obnoxious people.
    The question is NOT whether or not you think resources and services should be taken away from poor people so that rich people can have them.
    The question is NOT whether or not you think the quality of the actual health care should be different for people with different incomes.

    The question IS whether people should have the opportunity to purchase a few luxury services while they are in the hospital -- items that may help them feel better and better cope with the stress of their illness/injury. Or should all people, regardless of their resources be forced to accept the limited service level that the poorer people can afford?

    As someone who has buried both her parents in the last 10 years, I feel strongly that some optional services should be available for those that wish to purchase them.

    llg
  2. by   Marie_LPN, RN
    The optional services wouldn't be fair, because it's quite obvious that it'll take money to purchase them. Put an EO (Equal Opportunity) stamp on it, an income sliding scale, then we'll see how well it goes. Unless that happens, it'll never be fair.
  3. by   newgrad2004
    They all (the rooms) look the same with the lights off at night.

    But I hate those pts who will ask to be waited on hand and foot,( like the woman who got up to come to the nurses station for EVERYTHING yet asked for a diaper, wth for? During the day when your roamiing the halls? She was up and able to get to the restroom, could call you to tell you she had to go or went and to measure it. But wanted a diaper..) also those who are on their call light every 30 seconds, who want EVERYTHING YESTERDAY. You know those who actually call teh hospital and get the nunrses station to ask for something because you didnt make it quick enough to their call light.
  4. by   zacarias
    We have these mobile phones that we use on the unit so that we can be reached by another nurse, doc, lab etc...

    One day, I had a very demanding patient and was always on the light. Well, As I was eating lunch downstairs, my phone rang and it was this PATIENT! Someone gave her my #...it's like "Hello!"
  5. by   tmiller027
    I have to throw in my 2 cents. While struggling myself, I'm for the free market system. If someone has the money to pay for increased services, then that is their right. Thats why we have a capitalist system in the U.S.

    I know our tax dollars are distributed to others, but this still isn't a straight socialist or communist society like the old Soviet Union where everything belonged to the state.
  6. by   mattsmom81
    Quote from llg

    The question is NOT whether or not you like taking care of obnoxious people.
    The question is NOT whether or not you think resources and services should be taken away from poor people so that rich people can have them.
    The question is NOT whether or not you think the quality of the actual health care should be different for people with different incomes.


    llg
    Well, I'm looking again at the title of this thread, and it DOES ask the question of how we FEEL about 5 star rooms. so...its everybody's opinion here, right?
  7. by   Nikki730
    Quote from LPN2Be2004
    The optional services wouldn't be fair, because it's quite obvious that it'll take money to purchase them. Put an EO (Equal Opportunity) stamp on it, an income sliding scale, then we'll see how well it goes. Unless that happens, it'll never be fair.
    I'm not sure what this means (the part about Equal Opportunity). Does this mean that luxury should be subsidized? (Like the thicker blankets/personal chef/better food/prettier furniture, paintings on the wall?) Wouldn't the hospitals' expenditure on optional goods or services, be paid back when the patient pays his/her bill? I don't know where a sliding scale comes into play for luxury items/services. Maybe I'm mis-interpreting the post, though.

    In Texas, it used to be that counties that collected more in property tax had more $ for education. Then the state instituted the "robin hood plan" to take $ from wealthy counties and give it to poorer counties' schools. Fair? I don't know. Then, some people complained BITTERLY when the wealthier counties' citizens (who had kids attending those schools) volunteered time and donated $$ to bring their local schools back to their former level. As long as a certain min. standard in education/health care/other basic need is met (# of computers in the computer lab, for example) then what's wrong with someone buying and donating more computers for their old school? Some will say "but it should all be equal!" I guess I just don't understand that POV. And no, I didn't attend school in one of the wealthier counties. My question is "Did I get what I absolutely needed?" Not "Look at that guy over there, and what he got!"

    I can understand how some nurses might have the point of view that they feel degraded by serving the 5 star people, but then there are probably nurses out there who wouldn't have any problem with it.
  8. by   Dixiecup
    Quote from LPN2Be2004
    The optional services wouldn't be fair, because it's quite obvious that it'll take money to purchase them. Put an EO (Equal Opportunity) stamp on it, an income sliding scale, then we'll see how well it goes. Unless that happens, it'll never be fair.
    No one ever said life was fair.
  9. by   Marie_LPN, RN
    Quote from Dixiecup
    No one ever said life was fair.
    My point was, it's a little difficult to have 'equal healthcare for all' when things like this exist. And no where did i say life was fair. Jeez.
  10. by   FROGGYLEGS
    I don't know that I think this is an entirely great idea.

    However, I do think it is a lot better than the "hot bed" list we have now. Certain people on the "hot bed" list are to be catered to for whatever reason. Management is determined that everything be "perfect" for them (obviously better than what the average patient gets) simply because they are on this little list. These "special" patients are mixed in with the rest of our patients...erhm...customers. I am convinced that by spending extra amounts of time sucking up to the special folk, the less "important" patients are suffering. With the chronic understaffing, I do not have the time to give anybody any significant "special treatment". I must be a bad nurse.

    Someone did mention that this 5-star luxury wing would have better staffing ratios. If it really is necessary to pamper certain individual and to provide them with superior "service", it would be easier if you had the staff to do it at least.
  11. by   llg
    Quote from mattsmom81
    Well, I'm looking again at the title of this thread, and it DOES ask the question of how we FEEL about 5 star rooms. so...its everybody's opinion here, right?
    You're right. Everybody is free to feel however they feel and to express those feelings in this thread. I was just responding to those who seem to trying to make reasoned arguments against having luxury serices available on the basis that that it would take away resources needed by less wealthy patients ... and those who automatically assume that wealthier patients are automatically obnoxious and poorer patients are automatically nice.

    I guess you could also say that I was expressing my feelings about the bias against rich people and their needs that is so common among nurses.

    llg
  12. by   chris_at_lucas_RN
    I guess the point I was trying to make is "equal healthcare for all" is not the same as "all the goodies you can imagine, for free."

    The latter is not health care. If you can get goodies in a hospital, can afford it and want it, great. If you can't, you should still get good care.

    Would you treat poor patients differently from rich ones? Because that's the issue, not whether people who can afford goodies get to buy them.

    Why should I be punished for being able to get goodies? I didn't steal to get what I have, I worked for it.

    If you can't use what you have to get what you would like, what is the point of being able to have what you have?

    The basic definition of "the value of money" has nothing to do with equality OR math.....

    Lots of holier-than-thous in this thread, it seems.
  13. by   crankyasanoldma
    I like our 5 star rooms and always volunteer (as do many others at my institution) to take care of the patients there.

    I give the same care to the "5 star" patient as I do the the uninsured one in a shared room down the hall. The only difference in my day is that I will perform some nursing duties in a spacious, visually appealing room, and some in a standard room that day.

    As far as THIS nurse is concerned, the 5 star patient has wasted their extra money on me, and is paying for things like a fancy headboard and an extra couch and painting to see. Room service food delivery is free to all our patients anyway.

    I'm hoping that the extra they pay will help cover costs for the uninsured one down the hall, and I don't have a problem with that at all.

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