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mattsmom81

mattsmom81

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mattsmom81's Latest Activity

  1. mattsmom81

    ER Nurses Treated Different in my Hospital!

    :yeahthat: :beer:
  2. mattsmom81

    23 mother of 2..don't know if should be RN or LPN?

    Hey good for you...you can afford to go back to school! If you can, get your RN...it will be worth it. However, many of us could not afford to go to college and had to to get that LPN first. Then in a year you can be working and contributing again, then you can work part time and work towards your RN on your own time. That's how I did it many years ago. :) Do whats best for you and your family. I don't regret doing it the way I did, but I also like to advise potential nurses to get that RN now if you can swing it. Just because life has a way of throwing us curveballs on our future plans.
  3. mattsmom81

    I will not wear an apron or fanny pack...

    Most of the guys I work with like wearing a belt bag to hold all their extra 'stuff'. they wear it in front, not on their fanny.
  4. mattsmom81

    Last names on ID badges and retaliation by patients

    Good luck in getting this changed. Last names are not necessary IMO...and until we had significant harassment and stalking issues on the job, my employers resisted protecting us. Finally we were allowed to tape over our last names after several mentally ill patients or disgruntled former patients/familes found out our addresses and phone numbers and terrorized our families. Personally, I have had two instances. One who fixated on me and left lewd messages on my home answering maching, threatening to kill my husband. My small son was traumatized overhearing one of these. The other was an angry spouse of a patient who was a staff bullier, and when I stood up to him and called the police, he retaliated by stalking me for months.
  5. mattsmom81

    RN's w/chronic pain, using narcotics

    There is a misconception out there that those who need narcs to control pain are automatically 'impaired', which is totally untrue. I do know of some nurses who work with duragesic patches, etc...for chronic pain conditions (endometriosis and pelvic pain, severe arthritis) Some facilities and areas of the country are more open minded than others. So far I'm getting along with Tramadol but eventually I will need narcs too and will be in the same predicament. We have some nurses on this BB who take non narcs at work, and take the narcs at night to relax and sleep... to keep their employers happy. If you do a search, you should find a few other threads where this was discussed. :) Good luck to you...if we can meet the job description, have a valid RX, and are not impaired, there shouldn't be a problem IMHO, (but it is for many, sadly) The impaired nurse who diverts narcs is an stereotype. Nurses who occasionally use Vicodin for their arthritis,, for example, are the first suspects when the narc count is off. Personally I'd like to see some lawsuits filed, through the ADA, on this issue of nurses in chronic pain who need narcs to function. Seems discriminatory the way nurses are treated in this matter. Don't we have a right to control our pain??? Best wishes and hope things work out for you! :)
  6. mattsmom81

    Saudi Arabia

    I wouldn't want to go there personally. A coworker of mine went years ago with a group of nurses in HCA Columbia. She was in a car accident there. Healthcare facilities are not like the west, one is NOT in the US, and Americans aren't exactly favorites over there. By the way my friend ended up paralyzed for life. Obviously she does not recommend nurses go there.
  7. mattsmom81

    Have any of you done flu clinics????????

    I've signed up to do flu clinics tha past 2 years only to have them canceled the last minute due to vaccine shortages. Many semi retired local nurses would come out to do these, as they are not difficult and the paperwork is basic. Only when someone has a bad reaction to the vaccine does it get difficult....then you have crowd control and angry people who've been waiting in line and aggravated because you're dealing with the emergency. Sometimes you're the only nurse at these clinics. It takes some people skills for sure...dealing with the crowds. My agency scheduled 3-4 hour clinics so to get a full day in we had to work 2...and if the am clinics ran late that could be a problem. Many semi retired nurses report they like doing this every year just for the community contact; as they don't want to work often and wish not/cannotdo the hard facility work. . :) Most nurses will prefer a facility or agency shift of 30- 40 bucks an hour, so its hard to justify a break to do flu clinics and make less than half that. But if one is on a pension/SS it is a nice 2 week job for extra pocket money every year! :)
  8. mattsmom81

    RN clinical supervisor job description?

    Well, in my last agency the clinical supervisor did QA for the home health nursing part of the agency, and helped train new nurses as to the paperwork, orientation to cases, etc. She did not oversee the facility staffing at all..the recruitors just plugged us in. Another agency (facility only)the clinical supe did only administrative tasks, contracts with facilities, and staffing along with the recruitors/coordinators. Yet another directors were the owners as well as directors/supervisors, and DID fill in and do facility staffing occasionally; as well as home health visits, orientations, etc.. So...the short answer is it depends on the agency what the job description is guess! I'd make sure to ask about the job description details, get all that in writing so you're not surprised later...lots of extra duties could fall under the hat of clinical supervisor, if the agency wishes. Good luck!
  9. mattsmom81

    need help for severe depression

    Rhonda you sure sound like someone who deserves to be on SSD...this at least would stop your money worries RT your meds, and also give you enough to live on. Have your docs not suggested it?? Find an attorney to help you file, if you want...they will help fight through the paperwork, and take a percentage of what is owed (you must be out of work for a year to qualify and you get backpay). Hugs to you...'it is always darkest before the dawn' isn't that what they say? I used the bible to give me strangth...the parts that tell us we are about to become our strongest when we are weakest, because that is when we will reach out for spiritual help (and also community help) I remember feeling as low as you describe, and am here to reassure you things can get better, you can find the right combination of meds to control your pain. But people can help us only when we share with them. Sometimes we must get assertive with docs to get what we need. Keep telling them how bad you are feeling and insist they help you deal with this, and offer alternatives. Please just don't give up. You have a child...who depends on you in ways you don't even understand...and needs you to be at your best.l. You keep battling furballs (something I lose the battle to regularly) so I know you have the drive to persevere...LOL!! I had to give up on my nursing too...and the funny thing was, when I gave up on it and let it go, in time a nursing position appeared for me . It is homecare private duty. So...life works in mysterious ways, and God is good. Finding my spiritual center again was paramount for me, in finding a direction, setting a goal, prioritizing. finding a kind counselor helped there too. I'm thinking of you today and sending good thoughts your way. there are those of us here who can relate to everything you say...keep writing us if it helps. :kiss
  10. mattsmom81

    ER Nurses Treated Different in my Hospital!

    Its so much easier to blame someone else for the mess we find ourselves in at work, isn't it. Why don't we just admit we aren't really in control?? and try to learn to cope without pointing fingers at 'the other nurse?' I guess cuz I started on medsurg and worked ER prior to ICU, I don't have any 'attitude'...likely because I KNOW what the other nurse is dealing with out there! All the anger here at ER for all those last minute admissions...my goodness!! it happens!! Ive been fortunate to work with some kindhearted ER staff who will hold a patient for OUR next shift, because we haven't even sat down to do ANY paperwork due to numerous codes, admissions, and procedures, and its shift change. BUT when I encounter this kindness (and I do frequently, but don't abuse it) I reciprocate!! Not only if an ER nurse MUST move a patient from ER to my ICU stat/mid workup... cuz a patient is coding in the lobby and needs that ER bed, but when they are doing numerous procedures and need an extra hand, I will go and assist. I assist with their codes and gopher for them, as an extra hand. IT IS APPRECIATED!! If we did more of this, we would get along better. Lets be kind to one another out there nurses...as has already been said, its hard enough out there...we shouldn't make it harder on each other. Shame on us. So...go talk to that nurse in the other unit..respond to a call for help, float to a sister unit, ask to crosstrain... listen and learn and respect that other nurse...and watch how relations improve. When we walk in each others' duty shoes our minds are opened.
  11. Great suggestions...I love it! wish I'd known this stuff when I was a student...I took a C grade (doing A work myself) because my buddies in the group 'coasted' and I couldn't motivate them...GRRR.
  12. mattsmom81

    Annoyed that public doesn't know what nurses do?

    I have explained to friends and family members what its like to be a nurse. I've told everyone who cares how frustrating it is...with so much liability and zero authority. Patients are in a vulnerable position and when they're ill, they don't comprehend, they just 'need'. I wasn't debating, I was stating what for me is a fact. whenever appropriate and possible I educate my patients to my role and the misconceptions. I applaud nurses who publish and do interviews and get 'into the public eye' and aren't afraid to tell the truth about healthcare today. They are my heros. The nurses with advanced degrees generally are most listened to in my experience, but many of these these highly educated nurses don't have a 'down in the trenches' perspective, unfortunately. I absolutely LOVE those who do and aren't afraid to tell it like it is!! Everytime I see a commercial or a TV show portraying nurse stereotypes I cringe. I saw another one...the 'lusty nurse' after the young male patient wearing some deodorant spray. Its why I support the Center for Nurse Advocacy...we must address this stuff as it IS what the public listens to.
  13. mattsmom81

    How long until burn out?

    When do we burn out? Well, I've watched sweet young things do it within a year of graduation; and I've watched seasoned nurses just 'get that last straw' and find something more rewarding to do with their time. We all have our breaking point. For me that came when I realized no matter how good a leader I was, or how technically capable, nor how many extra hours I put in to try and bail out a bad situation; it would never be enough. That the facility and my equally burned out coworkers could not be counted on to do the right thing, (they were imperfect human beings under stress) and I couldn't expect them to care for me. I had to take control of MY life in and outside work; and make sure I was taking care of ME. It took me about 27 years to reach that point, so I did a lot right all those years. Adjusting the attitude, taking great care not to get TOO wrapped up in the drama of the workplace, making sure not to overdo...knowing thy limits.... my advice for avoiding burnout. :) The healthcare industry is one that will suck the marow right out of your bones...if you allow it.
  14. mattsmom81

    ER Nurses Treated Different in my Hospital!

    There are indeed good and bad among us...some will act superiror because they work ICU or ER and its a shame. Nursing is so specialized today we should all be proud of our contribution. I recall taking ACLS I never wanted to admit I was an ICU nurse...and I tried to not even say I was a hospital nurse!! I knew I would get the worst megacode and have the highest expectation. My worst instructors in megacode were paramedics. Seemed they had an axe to grind and sharpen to use on the nurses in ACLS. Professional jealousy and one upsmanship abound out there in nurses and nonnurses.
  15. mattsmom81

    Nurse Mobbing/bullying

    By Bama: 'The managment doesn't care to write up the nurses that have been there forever, you know, (the ones that cover every shift needing covered.)' Sadly I find this is true in much of acute care as well, and I'm even finding it in home health. !The 'established nurse' is allowed to continue her bad behavior no matter how destructive. The managers would rather keep status quo than support the new hires. Sad isn't it. Then there are some places where the new hires get the best schedules and even better pay...if the manager can get away with it, while the older nurses are abused and even run off. So much dysfunction out there...its a real challenge to find a nurse who is happy with her management team today. I am always jealous when I read a post here by a nurse who has a good, fair manager!!!
  16. mattsmom81

    Annoyed that public doesn't know what nurses do?

    Well its gotten to the point where there is so much to do, that we often choose to address more essential demands stuff (physical patient care issues) than the 'talking' stuff. I've been guilty of that...there is so much to be done, so little time in today's short staffed environment of care. I make a point of introducing myself and explaining basically what my role is wherever I'm working. They understand so little of the technical jargon, I find they mostly get the message I'm responsible for everything for them...including minor housekeeping duties and stuff for other depts. So..the public has quite selective hearing/understanding..and its understandable when they're ill. They just want 'somebody' to DO for them, and the nurse is the one who is 'there.'.
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