Graduate degrees as entry-level for other healthcare professions - page 7

You all are probably aware that PT requires (or will soon require, can't recall) the masters degree for entry into practice. Pharmacists need the PharmD. Etc., etc. Did any of these other... Read More

  1. by   BrandyBSN
    Originally posted by Susy K
    Renee, a general 4 year university degree is not all about prepping one to pass a test or to master test-taking skills. In addition, I argue that nursing is MORE than passing the coveted NCLEX-RN. What makes me a well-rounded person and one capable of speaking at public hearings, publishing, or being respected by NON-nurses is my ability to write, appreciate philosophic roots and it's impact on society and how society(my patients) view things, how art can be therapeutic, how history has taught us lessons, etc to name a few.

    My RN license is just a portion of who I am and where I fit in society, and how I can relate to other professionals of the world.

    Ok, enough talking. Back to work.

    I agree with that 100%
    Last edit by BrandyBSN on Oct 10, '02
  2. by   Vsummer1
    I am going to Graduate with a Degree. Cap and gown and all. It is called an associates degree.
  3. by   fab4fan
    The next time you fly, remember that the pilot is not a professional...

    It is a stereotype to say that membership in a union is the equivalent of having a "lesser" education. One has nothing to do with the other.

    Being a well-rounded person is not contingent on how much education one has; yes, it doesn't hurt, but it is not the only way. Life experience and education obtained in settings other than formal ones all contribute to helping one provide "holistic" care.

    I find the ANA's position equivocal, at best. If a BSN is considered to be the minimum entry level for "professional nursing", then they should back that up by closing membership to anyone with a lesser level of preparation.

    When my car breaks down, you can bet your bippy I'll be glad for that "unprofessional" mechanic.
  4. by   Q.
    Originally posted by MishlB
    I know everyone is TIRED of this subject.....but you don't gain respect through years of education.

    Not to be argumentative, but more inquisitive. What exactly then gains a person respect in our Western culture if not education? Let's take a look at who as a society we "respect."

    Professional athletes? Perhaps.
    Well accomplished physicians, scientists? Definitely.
    Actors/actresses? Maybe not.

    Sure, we respect the teachers who educate our young, we respect the firefighters for bravery, we respect moms who are fit to raise our young appropriately (and not simply be spreadin' their legs!) we respect individuals who rose above adversity and accomplished personal goals. Yes, this is all true. But, like it or not, society, as a whole, places value on educational levels and positions in professions, even if in a subconscious sense. It's evident in the media, in pop culture and in the way our society runs, at least in my opinion.
  5. by   Q.
    Originally posted by fab4fan


    Being a well-rounded person is not contingent on how much education one has; yes, it doesn't hurt, but it is not the only way. Life experience and education obtained in settings other than formal ones all contribute to helping one provide "holistic" care.

    I agree completely. Life experience however, can not substitute for formal education, just as formal education can not substitute for life experience. Each complements each other. There is so much more to life than just MY limited experiences, no matter how broad, just as there is more to life than class content.

    A well-rounded person needs BOTH. Just as a well-rounded person needs exposure to ALL aspects of what makes us a society, including art, literature, humanities, anthropology and science. Our society and what makes us people is ALOT more than just a nursing program prepping you to take a basic entry level test.
  6. by   fab4fan
    SusieK: I do not disagree that increasing one's education is beneficial, and that society does place a certain value on degrees.
    But your signature line really interests me, because it seems to conflict with your stated opinion...a least how I'm reading you.

    In any case, I enjoy hearing different points of view...perhaps with continued dialogue we'll be able to find a middle ground.
  7. by   Q.
    Thanks for noticing my sig line, but actually I think it fits me and my opinions perfectly and congruently!

    While I value education and feel that education is NEVER wasted, there is a difference between simply regurgitating facts presented to you (which requires being educated on them) and actually challenging what you heard and having original thought (that requires actual THINKING) So while I proport education, I also encourage actually USING it and applying, versus simple rote memorization. Am I making sense?

    Plus I think it helps people to understand why it seems like I "disagree" with everyone. It's not necessarily disagreeing but more so challenging one on their views and why they hold those views. I don't accept answers like "because" or something like that. I learn from others just as much as anyone else, and their reasoning for their beliefs is of interest to me. When people don't give that to me, I literally starve.
    Last edit by Susy K on Oct 10, '02
  8. by   live4today
    Alrightyyyyyyyyyyy thennnnnnnnn....

    Are we done yet...are we done yet.....are we done yet.........

    My my my......what magnificent discussions have gone on since I left this BB seven hours ago! Have we resolved anything yet? Is anyone all the wiser for what they've read thus far on this thread? Any nursing students and seasoned nurses without their BSN feel the need to now obtain it after reading this thread thus far? How about each person sharing what they've gained thus far from this thread's topic so the rest of us can compare notes? Thanks.....really enjoying this.....really I am.....cause I, for one, will be returning to college in the very near future. For what you ask????? Glad you asked......shows you have an inquiring mind. Well......counseling is my future.....Psych nurse/group therapist.....for starters. :kiss
  9. by   semstr
    WWOOOOOOOOOOOOWWWWWWWWw!
    And you all want to march together? ROFLMAO
    Renee
  10. by   caroladybelle
    Anyone note the one of the richest, most talented, most accomplished individuals in the world today.......dropped out of college.

    Bill Gates, to whom we owe alot of our ability to carry on this debate online.

    (okay, just had to stir up the masses with that one)
  11. by   SmilingBluEyes
    YOU STOLE MY THUNDER CAROL~ I was just about to say that myself. Whoever says life experiences cannot replace formal education is only part right and has not lived long obviously. All one need to is speak to an elder of any culture to see how that is not entirely true. Like I said before, (ad nauseum) I respect education but let us don't forget the WHOLE person when considering one's worth and place in society. Thank you for that CAROL!
  12. by   Q.
    Originally posted by caroladybelle
    Anyone note the one of the richest, most talented, most accomplished individuals in the world today.......dropped out of college.

    Bill Gates, to whom we owe alot of our ability to carry on this debate online.

    (okay, just had to stir up the masses with that one)
    Let's not forget that Bill Gates did drop out of Harvard, simply because he was too advanced for what they were teaching and had different interests. That's a helluva lot of difference between THAT, and simply saying "I don't NEED education simply because I am so many years old."

    Life experiences count for alot yes, but one single human being's life experience is pathetically narrow compared to what life is really about. Just because I haven't traveled to the Roman ruins doesn't mean I can't discuss them or their impact (still) on Western culture. I simply feel that there is too much to learn about life outside my own little teeny tiny backyard - unfortunately the world is too big and time too scarce to see it all - therefore it HAS to come from formal education.
    If I could, I would travel extensively and visit cultures and every flippin piece of land on this earth, as well as space travel, and make sure to speak with people who've all had different experiences, lives, jobs, decisions, accomplishments, rather than attending class at night. But, it's not feasible for most people. Therefore, if I relied on MY own life experience of being who I am, living where I do, I'd be robbed of what human beings - as a WHOLE, have to offer.

    Not to mention, alot of the people I want to talk to are simply....DEAD. Formal education replaces that.
    Last edit by Susy K on Oct 11, '02
  13. by   ICUBecky
    wow, suzy k...you are so eloquent! i agree 100% with EVERYTHING you say.

close