Ethical Debate: Organ Transplants - page 5

3rdShiftGuy had a great ethical question in the 17y/o organ transplant tragedy that somewhat went unanswered. I think it would be a great thing to debate and discuss, but to avoid confusion and hurt... Read More

  1. by   Q.
    It would be really interesting if we can some solid facts on the organ transplant processes in foreign countries and figure out why people come here, and why we don't go there, etc.
  2. by   lee1
    I would like to ask another question. What happens when nonamerican tourists/ illegal aliens that are in this country have a traumatic event and THEIR organs could be used???? Are they approached also by the sharing network/UNOS??
    At my hospital ALL deaths must be reported to the sharing network, info is given and THEY decide if the organs can be harvested and THEY go ask the families.
    Also, ANYONE who is to undergo any type of brain death protocol I believe now the sharing network wants to be notified also.

    That said----it is my personal belief, that if there are NO American citizens/holders of permanent visa that can benefit from the organ transplant at that specific time/event then YES and only then should the organs not be wasted and given to noncitizens/non holders of permanent visas.

    Why is it that a country like Mexico does not perform transplants in its capital city---- Where have all the people who needed transplants gone before? HERE????
  3. by   Furball
    Didn't a young American die a few years back in Italy and his organs were used there? I vaguely remember a young boy. I'll have to try and look it up. I have early alzheimers so don't quote me on this, ok?

    Don't know if this means anything to this discussion
    Last edit by Furball on Feb 23, '03
  4. by   Sally_ICURN
    Originally posted by Susy K
    ...why people come here, and why we don't go there, etc.
    Technology to do the surgery and support the recovery, and the lack thereof.
  5. by   karenG
    over here, health care is available to all, that includes things like transplants. ok there are issues over people making themselves homeless and claiming refugee status to get the health care that they percieve as a need. we pay for health care though our taxes-not insurance. so the number of us who pay into the system is small compared to the number who access it. I think the issue is partly about the inequity of health care across the world. If my child needed something that wasnt available here, then I would go to where I could fulful that need.........but I'd expect to pay, and wouldnt expect anyone to suffer because of the choice that I had made.
    maybe it comes down to the 'is health care a right' thing. dont think that there is any easy answer.

    Karen
  6. by   NurseGirlKaren
    Yes, organs from people here in the U.S. who suffer brain death are used in the process. I was involved in a case a few years ago of an individual who was here working illegally and sending money to his home country for his family. Was pronounced brain dead and the OPO contacted his family and received consent for organ donation. Very interesting, some of the cultural issues that were involved. Plus, I was able to see the surgery to harvest his organs. Wow is all I can say.
  7. by   Stargazer
    Originally posted by Furball
    Didn't a young American die a few years back in Italy and his organs were used there? I vaguely remember a young boy. I'll have to try and look it up. I have early alzheimers so don't quote me on this, ok?

    Don't know if this means anything to this discussion
    http://www.nicholasgreen.org/

    A young boy from California, Nicholas Green, was killed by highway robbers while vacationing in Italy with his family. His parents agreed to donate his organs, which went to seven Italians waiting for transplants. Reg and Maggie Green spoke openly to the media, with no bitterness, about their loss and decision. The world took the story--and the Greens--to its heart. In the first few days after his death, the number of people signing organ donor cards in Italy quadrupled. Donations there last year were more than double the rate they were in the year before he died.
    Actually, I was going to post something about this earlier too, because it does speak to the culture in some countries regarding organ donation. I've never been clear on why the Italians did not, for the most part, believe in or choose to participate in organ donation prior to Nicholas Green--but it makes me think that in countries with similar cultures, a decent public service campaign could go a long way towards changing that collective attitude, and persuade people to lobby their goverments for a system similar to UNOS or Eurotransplant.
  8. by   dana d
    WoW! what controversey, so lets add to it. I die, I'm an organ donor. My grandson needs a heart transplant, he matches mine, But he is not next on the list. Another child who has been waiting, but not more acute, matches, should that child receive my heart. Who should get my heart? My grandson may die before another match is found. Does my family have a say into where my organs go? should my family be paid for my organs?
    And if thats not bad enough, let talk baseball. Without mentioning names, who was bumped ahead of the crowd because of his money and status in our society. After years of self destruction he received a liver transplant, while other individuals died. I stop at that.

    The whole system needs readjusted. My condolences to the family of the 17 year old - not American - who died. But my condolences also go out to the family and person to whom those organs may have gone to in America. When are we going to start taking care of us. When do we say " no " to lets make another dollar and " yes " to our Country. Other countries don't put Americans first. Why do we put ourselves last?

    Proud to be an American, dana d
    Last edit by dana d on Feb 23, '03
  9. by   Q.
    Originally posted by Stargazer
    http://www.nicholasgreen.org/


    Actually, I was going to post something about this earlier too, because it does speak to the culture in some countries regarding organ donation. I've never been clear on why the Italians did not, for the most part, believe in or choose to participate in organ donation prior to Nicholas Green--but it makes me think that in countries with similar cultures, a decent public service campaign could go a long way towards changing that collective attitude, and persuade people to lobby their goverments for a system similar to UNOS or Eurotransplant.
    Thanks for the link, Stargazer. Interesting story. Your point about a public service campaign is well taken too. Hey, I got an idear. Let's relocate to Italy and start such a campaign. Wouldn't it be fun?
  10. by   Stargazer
    Right. We should start by renting a villa in Tuscany and stocking up on lots of wine for the months of brainstorming ahead, yes? :chuckle
  11. by   Q.
    Definitely. See, we're halfway there already!
  12. by   kids
    Originally posted by dana d
    ...I die, I'm an organ donor. My grandson needs a heart transplant, he matches mine, But he is not next on the list. Another child who has been waiting, but not more acute, matches, should that child receive my heart. Who should get my heart? My grandson may die before another match is found. Does my family have a say into where my organs go?...
    I think that families can do *some* specifing when it comes to a family member receiving an organ.

    For some reason I think something along these lines occured in a mid to south Atlantic State 2-5 years ago...car accident involving a college girl (or a HS girl that had been visiting colleges) and an organ going to a grandparent maybe????.

    Anyone else recall something like this or did I dream it up?
  13. by   fab4fan
    You didn't dream it up...I remeber that situation, too...just can't remeber all the details, though.

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