Does your hospital have a lift team - page 2

One of the hospitals I did a clinical rotation in had a lift team that consisted of 2 big men. They would go all over the hospital when paged and lift patients for the nurses and other staff for... Read More

  1. by   KC CHICK
    HAH!! Not on your life.
    Took 5 of us to lift a 300# pt. back into bed last weekend.
  2. by   suzannasue
    Nope... no way... lift team is an unheard of concept with administration...and according to administration we have no reason to complain about lifting patients...staffing is adequate...hahahahahaha...I distinctly remember being the only nurse on the unit one night due to low census...had to admit a >350 lb patient, unable to move herself...calls for help were unmet by nurses on other units....guess who stayed on her back the rest of the night ???? Suggested a specialty bed for the larger patients and was told we do not have a contract with a specialty mattress / bed company...ok...pick up the phone and get one...
    I spend my time off with a heating pad and my bottle of Soma...
  3. by   nimbex
    We inplemented a lift leam. about 30-40 persons worked 7a-3p. They had two weeks of training, ergomonics, infection controll, ect. IT WAS GREAT. You e-mailed requests and they would come and get your patient in the chair, and return at the specified time and return them to bed!!!!!!!!

    Due to finances, they were disbanded after only 3 months.... miss those guys
  4. by   zambezi
    We have the lifts, don't think i have used one though...ususally we use one another but we do have techs that we can call if we are too short (often) or if we need more than one or two people...the techs are great...not necessarily big, but extra hands for sure...they will walk with the patients around the unit too...it is nice when you need it.
  5. by   P_RN
    *I* used to think I could lift too though it was pushing a bed that finally did me in.

    It's the nurses who hear about the dissatisfied patients "grandma never got up in the chair the WHOLE time she was......"

    PS grandma weighed 400#. No balloons, stickies, lapel tags for being a "good little nurses" when grandson complains.
  6. by   lee1
    Originally posted by kona2
    We have a lift team. God bless them!
    Don't be fooled...yes, I STILL do plenty of lifting anyway. But for the really big & heavy patients...we CAN call in the big guns "the lift team." They happen to be men, but the important thing is that they are strong, on call, trained in patient transfers & available to help most weekdays. Sometimes it takes 30 minutes and utilizes the entire staff to mobilize a patient, so if the lift team can help us out, we truly appreciate it! It's a great idea.

    GO Lift team!
    We are looking into a lift team also.
    Can you give me some info about yours.
    How many people?
    Do they work days only Mon-Fri
    How do they prioritize the lifting calls??
    What is one of them is sick or on vacation???
    I assume they wear a beeper?
    Who are they responsible to?
    Do they keep a log of all of their calls?
    Are they paid more than the techs or escorts?
    Do they have any extra benefits--like use of the hospital gym if you have one?????

    Lee RN
  7. by   lee1
    Originally posted by jevans
    The Trust where I work has a strict no lifting policy. My unit......stroke rehab has 3 standing hoists and 2 sling hoists which are used even to pick pts up from floor. they are a god send!
    If the pt is heavier than the hoist recommended weight........ we have to complete a clinical risk form and then order a hoist, and bed big enough.

    As someone who has been nursing a very long time .......bad back and all....these hoists are essential

    Any facility without a hoist must obtain them
    Can you tell me the name of the manufacturer of these devices??
  8. by   lee1
    Originally posted by nimbex
    We inplemented a lift leam. about 30-40 persons worked 7a-3p. They had two weeks of training, ergomonics, infection controll, ect. IT WAS GREAT. You e-mailed requests and they would come and get your patient in the chair, and return at the specified time and return them to bed!!!!!!!!

    Due to finances, they were disbanded after only 3 months.... miss those guys
    WHAT??? 30-40 people???
    Why were they disbanded if everyone loved them???
  9. by   eak16
    We have a lift team and they are a lifesaver- days and evenings, seven days a week. I have heard statistics saying that last year they reduced the number of staff injuries by some astronomical amount. They aren't rushed, they have special training (and use mechanical lifts most of the time), and they dont have other a million other things to distract them like nurses do, so it just works better.

    And they aren't big guys! the first team consisted of two women.
  10. by   psychonurse
    That sounds like a great concept for any hospital. I know that my back would have appreciated it when I was working in hospitals. Those people on vents that weigh 200-300 pounds are hard to get to the top of the bed with just two little nurses in the unit to turn them.....That is why sometims a little Baclofen really helps me out.
  11. by   mattsmom81
    I like the concept of lift teams and no lift policies as it sounds safer for everybody, IMO. When I was a young nurse we had 'orderlies'...usually men...their combined upper body strength and focus (reduced distractions in their job) made for a safer lift all around.

    I agree with Eak...non nurses and other depts (like PT) do NOT see the effects of rushing, distractions and excessive job stress. Add an uncooperative or deadweight patient and insufficient strength or numbers of lifters and it's a recipe for nurse injury.

    PT keeps trying to teach 'proper lifting technique' as a solution to nurse injuries, but that is definitely NOT the problem from what I've observed through the years. The proper technique may protect in near perfect conditions....conditions nurses rarely see in real life.

    This probably sounds bad but I will also refuse to budge patients if I can't get enough lift help...they will just have to remain on bedrest and use the bedpan and I don't care if family (or doctors) complains. I will NOT risk hurt myself on them, although I was bullied into it when I was young and foolish.

    Now, if docs insist on getting difficult patients up, I've been known to obtain orders for "PT to get patient up"...as they have the time and focus to do so safely... a luxury I frequently do NOT have on a chronically understaffed unit.
  12. by   Sleepyeyes
    Hospitals and nursing homes here in the US get out of having lift teams and devices that are appropriate because OSHA has only "suggestions," not laws.

    I researched this when we were in LTC and had beds on the floor that would not rise to meet the level necessary for care. So we had to stand demented, combative people up from the floor, or get down and roll them back and forth to change them while the bed was on the floor.

    I'd be in tears, my back hurt so bad, and there was no law to protect me except disability.

    It's time for a change, folks. Even longshoremen have better back health than nurses.
  13. by   JasonC
    For now, I am actually part of a lift team...which consists of two of us...I work at a small local hospital in San Diego. It is a new program there...so we are just starting this program out....It seems to be going well so far.

    I have a question for anyone that has a Lift team in place already. Are nurses/cna's required to be in the room and assist? Here it seems whenever we show up...it seems no one wnats to assist us with IV lines etc. We are not CNA's or anything like that. If something happens we will be the brunt of it...I think someone should be in the room to help? Does that make sense or not?

    Jason

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