Do you ever wish people didn't know you were a nurse? - page 3

I'm just wanting to gripe a bit. I'm a very private person and don't make it a practice to broadcast info. about myself all over the place. I'm speaking specifically right now of going to the... Read More

  1. by   MurseNeutron
    yeah im def. not ricky rescuer when i leave the hospital, but i would never hide the fact. if my neighbor asked me to look at his private parts i think i might laugh in his or her face and tell them to get insurance. that would take family. sounds like you need to either take some time off or work on your seperation from job to personal life. maybe keeping your mind busy or doing cross word puzzles to get your mind off work when you leave. if you enjoy your job just let it go. about the doctors: if its bothering you with their confrontation try the opposite of what disturbs you. embrace it.... when you first walk in tell them your a nurse and either go really overboard with it (i gurantee they wouldnt want to talk about it then because they know it wouldnt be an issue, plus as a bonus probably very amusing to yourself) or tell them flat out i dont feel like talking about it. im sure youll make it through playa, keep ya head up
  2. by   luv2yoga
    I'm still in nursing school but I've had several acquaintances ask me about their rectal problems. I am always so amazed that they will ask me about something so personal and they don't even know me at all...hope it's not a taste of what's to come.
  3. by   vonxojn
    I generally don't let people know that I'm a nurse. They tend to change their style of nursing and do things that that don't do. Like a "real" physical assessment. But then you do have those nurses that make it their goal for the day to let you know that they are a nurse. Once they tell you that they are a nurse then they expect "special treatment" for themselves or family members. Or try to tell you how to nurse..yeah right.
  4. by   puggymae
    As I laid in my bed 2 hours post op after having my gall-bladder removed (open) the daughter of the woman in the next bed (who was near death due to brain cancer) said to me "I am wore out, since your a nurse would you keep an eye on mama and call me if I need to come back?" That was at 4:00 pm; at midnight a woman came into my room (my new private room) and asked if I would come and try to start her sisters IV! But the absolute most astounding request came from the house supervisor who came into my room to ask if I would watch the desk and "just answer call lights" while a code was going on.
  5. by   Marie_LPN, RN
    If i'm going for a dr. appt., i do bring up that i'm a nurse, and what dept. i work in. What type of work someone does can be relevent to when they can return to their job after surgery.

    I went to an orthopod this week for a consultation on my knee (it was hurting). Well, the doc i saw is also one i work with a lot (we joked that 20 hrs a week wasn't enough time spent together, and here i was at his office), and he knew from that the physical demands of my job, and that i'm on my feet 10-16 hours a day on a hard floor. But if he didn't know these things already, i would have told him.
  6. by   Lacie
    I can definitely attribute that being open that I was a nurse to a health professional was beneficial. I had severely fractured my left ulna requiring an open reduction. Of course we all know how costly this can be without health insurance. I was per diem and without. The Ortho that I had to consult with was kind enough to give me what he called "Professional Courtesy" and didnt charge me anything for the procedure!! I was shocked as I also didnt know nor had ever worked with the surgeon. Needless to say it saved me about 6 grand!! I only had to pay the or bill for the hospital at about 2 grand. Wish we had more of these guys around that's for sure!!
  7. by   talaxandra
    Quote from Marie_LPN
    I'm noticing that the times i've been asked by somewhat strangers what i do for a living, and after i answer, the next statements are "Are Grey's Anatomy/House/Scrubs/ER how nursing really is?" Gag.
    And you answer: Absolutely. Just like on "Grey's Anatomy" the few nurses there are sleep with half the medical staff; and just like on "ER" the medical staff have power over nursing jobs and careers, there are no nurse managers, and like "Grey's", doctor-nurse hookups are common. "Scrubs" does show nurses caring for patients and interacting with doctors - sheer fantasy! I've never seen a single nurse of "House", but doctors really do: move beds, give all the meds, take all the blood, perform all the vital signs, conduct all the procedures, analyse the specimens themselves, etc. It's just like real life!
  8. by   Multicollinearity
    There is a bright side to all this. These people altering their responses are doing so because they have respect for nurses, and trust them.

    I mention this because my father's family thinks nurses are dumb people you tolerate until you talk to the (((doctor))). So I think it's safe to say they will never ask me for advice!
    Last edit by Multicollinearity on Nov 26, '06
  9. by   rach_nc_03
    Quote from Lacie
    I can definitely attribute that being open that I was a nurse to a health professional was beneficial. I had severely fractured my left ulna requiring an open reduction. Of course we all know how costly this can be without health insurance. I was per diem and without. The Ortho that I had to consult with was kind enough to give me what he called "Professional Courtesy" and didnt charge me anything for the procedure!! I was shocked as I also didnt know nor had ever worked with the surgeon. Needless to say it saved me about 6 grand!! I only had to pay the or bill for the hospital at about 2 grand. Wish we had more of these guys around that's for sure!!
    My FIL had a horrible aneurysm ten years ago (3 PEs, a handful of codes, 3 months ICU stay). This was long before I met my husband. My MIL is also an RN, but she had a tough time dealing with stuff directly in this case (I can only imagine what it's like to witness your husband having a PE!), and when the co-insurance bills started pouring in, she called her sister, a medical records specialist, to come help sort them out.

    His bills- AFTER a fairly good insurance plan- were about $90K (I think it was an 80/20 plan, but 3 months in the ICU, y'know?). MIL's sister called all the docs, told them the situation, and requested 'professional courtesy' for their fees. Almost every single one obliged. I was floored when she told me about it.
  10. by   Jo Dirt
    Wait a minute, no one ever mentioned there was such a thing as "professional courtesy." I've got some bills for lab work that were not covered, next time the collectors call I can tell them I want professional courtesy?
  11. by   Jo Dirt
    Quote from vonxojn
    But then you do have those nurses that make it their goal for the day to let you know that they are a nurse. Once they tell you that they are a nurse then they expect "special treatment" for themselves or family members. Or try to tell you how to nurse..yeah right.
    When I was in school there was a patient in ICU who's daughter was a nurse and who was at the patient's bedside the whole time we were doing rotations. Every time anyone entered the room, one of the first things out of her mouth was, I'm an RN. I don't know if it was just her claim to fame or if she intended to lord it over everyone else, but it was incredibly annoying. What would she have done if the person said I don't care...?
  12. by   Marie_LPN, RN
    Every time anyone entered the room, one of the first things out of her mouth was, I'm an RN. I don't know if it was just her claim to fame or if she intended to lord it over everyone else, but it was incredibly annoying. What would she have done if the person said I don't care...?
    That pt. either travels or has a twin sister around my area. The best reply i saw to this person was "that's nice" from the nurse taking care of her. And her nurse just said it, and continued with what she had come in the room to do.
  13. by   rach_nc_03
    Quote from motorcycle mama
    Wait a minute, no one ever mentioned there was such a thing as "professional courtesy." I've got some bills for lab work that were not covered, next time the collectors call I can tell them I want professional courtesy?
    That, I don't know. I doubt it. I did a simple google search on the term 'professional courtesy' and found this: Physicians, the law and professional courtesy .

    Now, I don't speak legal-ese (and I only briefly skimmed the article), but it seems like this is something that goes on all the time between physicians. I think it's truly intended for the actual physician's services, not other fees (hospital room & board, lab fees, diagnostic tests, etc.). I could be wrong.

    I will say that, in retrospect, a lot of the docs at the hospital where I used to work would take my carbon-copy billing sheet (the thing you get from the receptionist when you check in) and say, 'don't worry about this- take care,' then let me leave by the back door (that didn't go by the front desk, but out into the hospital hallway). That was particularly helpful when I had incisional leakage after back surgery- I know they ran some tests on the drainage but didn't bill me for it. of course, they also knew I was currently unemployed (thanks to the back surgery)- I never even thought of it being professional courtesy at the time.

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