Are nurses in other nations bilingual? Should US be? - page 7

I had an arguement with one of my nurse practicioners yesterday. Irregardless of how any of us feel about immigrants, legal or illegal, it's very frustrating to have to treat a patient when you or... Read More

  1. by   Pumpkin1621
    Quote from mercyteapot
    How could you believe that we're overlooking the fact that learning a second language as an adult is difficult??? That is precisely what keeps most of us from doing so! It isn't any easier for us than it is for the people who have moved here. The bottom line is that if you want to live here, the onus should be on you to make the difficult transition, not to expect someone else to do so just to accommodate you. Period.

    We have more resources to learn a new language. There are so many schools here, colleges, etc. Right now I am taking free French courses (via rosetta stone) through my library, and I plan to take college courses next summer. I doubt that Mexico has all of that. The economical difference is huge and we cannot expect them to meet the same educational standards we may put on ourselves. They just don't have the same education system we do.
  2. by   Roy Fokker
    Quote from pumpkin1621
    they just don't have the same education system we do.
    if you want to 'compare' systems - they don't have our health care system either!

    i don't think any person on this thread so far has stated that "being bi-lingual is bad".

    it's one thing to try and help someone out if they have a genuine need and emergency ---- but it is quite another to expect bi/multi lingual services just because you immigrate to a foreign land.


    it doesn't mean the hosts are "resistive" or "lazy" - it's just that as "hosts" they also have certain "expectations" of "guests"... including 'following' the laws, customs etc. of the land.

    imho, of course.

    cheers,
  3. by   rn/writer
    Quote from roy fokker
    if you want to 'compare' systems - they don't have our health care system either!

    i don't think any person on this thread so far has stated that "being bi-lingual is bad".

    it's one thing to try and help someone out if they have a genuine need and emergency ---- but it is quite another to expect bi/multi lingual services just because you immigrate to a foreign land.


    it doesn't mean the hosts are "resistive" or "lazy" - it's just that as "hosts" they also have certain "expectations" of "guests"... including 'following' the laws, customs etc. of the land.

    imho, of course.

    cheers,
    this goes double--no triple--if you enter the country illegally. when you come here in defiance of the law, please do not take it personally when we balk at your demands.
  4. by   Pumpkin1621
    if you want to 'compare' systems - they don't have our health care system either!
    and? i think if anyone is in this country they should have the right to be treated if they are ill. just like i would expect to be treated if i were in another country.

    i don't think any person on this thread so far has stated that "being bi-lingual is bad".
    i didn't say anyone was stating that.

    it's one thing to try and help someone out if they have a genuine need and emergency ---- but it is quite another to expect bi/multi lingual services just because you immigrate to a foreign land.
    i don't think they expect us to be able to communicate with them, but i'm sure that they think it would be nice. in fact the few people that i know that don't speak english wish they did, not the other way around.


    it doesn't mean the hosts are "resistive" or "lazy" - it's just that as "hosts" they also have certain "expectations" of "guests"... including 'following' the laws, customs etc. of the land.
    as i said before our ancestors didn't do that. they came here and didn't give a crap that they couldn't speak the native tongue. that isn't how things work anyway. people don't ever say oh lets be nice to our neighbors and incorporate their language into our society, usually official languages are added b/c there is a need for it. forgive me but your post does make you sound resistive. as i said earlier this is a global society and we need to start looking beyond our picket fences.
  5. by   mercyteapot
    Quote from Pumpkin1621
    We have more resources to learn a new language. There are so many schools here, colleges, etc. Right now I am taking free French courses (via rosetta stone) through my library, and I plan to take college courses next summer. I doubt that Mexico has all of that. The economical difference is huge and we cannot expect them to meet the same educational standards we may put on ourselves. They just don't have the same education system we do.
    Once they get here, it is up to them to utilize the systems to learn English, not vice versa. It is simply unrealistic to think you can pull up stakes in your homeland, for whatever reason, travel to a land with more resources and opportunities and expect them to bend over backward to accommodate you. No siree, Roberto, I don't begrudge you your presence here (even if you didn't trouble yourself with obtaining permission to come), but expecting me to go to school to learn your language so that you don't have to learn mine just isn't going to cut it with me.
  6. by   Pumpkin1621
    Quote from mercyteapot
    Once they get here, it is up to them to utilize the systems to learn English, not vice versa. It is simply unrealistic to think you can pull up stakes in your homeland, for whatever reason, travel to a land with more resources and opportunities and expect them to bend over backward to accommodate you. No siree, Roberto, I don't begrudge you your presence here (even if you didn't trouble yourself with obtaining permission to come), but expecting me to go to school to learn your language so that you don't have to learn mine just isn't going to cut it with me.
    Haha ok. Well that is your opinion and mine is different. I agree it should be an equal responsibiltiy and that they should learn english once they get here. If I am willing to take time to learn spanish they should respect us and do the same. (At least learn basics.)
  7. by   EricJRN
    Quote from mercyteapot
    It is simply unrealistic to think you can pull up stakes in your homeland, for whatever reason, travel to a land with more resources and opportunities and expect them to bend over backward to accommodate you.
    Is it unrealistic? Or is it the current reality?
  8. by   mercyteapot
    Quote from Pumpkin1621
    Haha ok. Well that is your opinion and mine is different. I agree it should be an equal responsibiltiy and that they should learn english once they get here. If I am willing to take time to learn spanish they should respect us and do the same. (At least learn basics.)
    Sorry, but we're not agreeing that it should be a shared responsibility. IMHO, it should be their responsibility only, not mine. I've got enough to worry about, thank you, I don't feel it necessary to take on learning the language of every immigrant that crosses my path (and I live in San Diego, so if that was my philosophy, I'd have to learn a number of different languages, not just Spanish).
  9. by   Pumpkin1621
    Quote from mercyteapot
    Sorry, but we're not agreeing that it should be a shared responsibility. IMHO, it should be their responsibility only, not mine. I've got enough to worry about, thank you, I don't feel it necessary to take on learning the language of every immigrant that crosses my path (and I live in San Diego, so if that was my philosophy, I'd have to learn a number of different languages, not just Spanish).
    Yeah I know your stance. I just mistyped. However, the question of the OP was not do you think everyone should be forced to learn an immigrants language. The question was should it be part of the nursing curriculum to learn another language. Our degree already requires a specific amount of humanities and I think that 6 credits of them should be languages.
  10. by   mercyteapot
    Quote from EricEnfermero
    Is it unrealistic? Or is it the current reality?
    Yes, it is unrealistic. The current reality is that there are people who expect to be accommodated, which is their business, but they can just take the time and trouble to find someone to translate for them. There is no reason to expect me to master a language that I couldn't even master when I was young. I realize this is an inconvenience for people who don't speak English, but again, if you want to make a new life for yourself, then you should certainly expect some hardships. I promise here and now that if I ever decide to resettle in Mexico, I will not do so with the attitude that they should be so happy to have me in their presence that they learn English just to make me feel at home.
  11. by   EricJRN
    Where I live, the reality is that people (not all people, but enough) do bend over backward to help those in the situation you described. My point is that it's not unrealistic for a new immigrant to expect the same, because it is occurring here every day already.

    I'm one of the people with the skills necessary (language-wise) to help non-English speakers, so you guys can be mad at me if you like. I don't do it out of a desire to perpetuate a cycle of illegal immigration, but I do it mainly because I already have the skills and it adds to my value as an employee.
  12. by   TazziRN
    I don't think they EXPECT us to be able to communicate with them, but I'm sure that they think it would be nice. In fact the few people that I know that don't speak English wish they did, not the other way around.
    And this is where you are so horribly wrong. I have been a nurse for 19 years. I have lost track of how many Spanish-speaking pts have gotten upset at me for not speaking Spanish. They not only expect us to speak Spanish, they get downright mad when we don't. I have had people from other countries come into the ER and they bring their own interpreters: Chinese, East Indian, Italian, Saudi.....none of them expect us to know their language.

    Korean was my first language. My mom, nanny, brother, and I spoke Korean all day until my dad came home, then switched to English. When I started school my first-grade teacher sent a note home that my English was poor. My mom.....from Korea and speaking broken English herself.....said "No more Korean in the house, she has to learn English for living in the States."
  13. by   Pumpkin1621
    Quote from TazziRN
    And this is where you are so horribly wrong. I have been a nurse for 19 years. I have lost track of how many Spanish-speaking pts have gotten upset at me for not speaking Spanish. They not only expect us to speak Spanish, they get downright mad when we don't. I have had people from other countries come into the ER and they bring their own interpreters: Chinese, East Indian, Italian, Saudi.....none of them expect us to know their language.

    Korean was my first language. My mom, nanny, brother, and I spoke Korean all day until my dad came home, then switched to English. When I started school my first-grade teacher sent a note home that my English was poor. My mom.....from Korea and speaking broken English herself.....said "No more Korean in the house, she has to learn English for living in the States."
    Is it b/c they expect you to know it or b/c they are hurt/have family that is hurting and they are frustrated at the communication barrier. You can't really say what that person is feeling if you cannot even communicate with them. But if I read your post correctly you are saying that only Spanish people feel this way. That is a little prejudice don't you think? Maybe some do feel this way, and I'm not saying that there aren't any that do, but they are not the majority.

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