Adn's Who Don't Care - page 6

hello all, i would like to know if there are any adn's out there who have no desire to get there bsn's. not because of laziness or not wanting knowledge or anything else negative, but just don't... Read More

  1. by   RunningWithScissors
    If I were to go back to school, it would not be for a BSN.

    Our clinical ladder rewards a Bachelor's degree, not necessarily a BSN.

    How about making yourself more marketable and get an advanced degree in something else (computer science, criminology, heck even forestry).

    Check into it and see if, for that extra pay, the degree MUST be in nursing!
  2. by   jenrninmi
    Quote from Elisheva
    I want my BSN but it really has nothing to do with nursing. I want a four year degree because a lot of different jobs require A four year degree, and an RN to BSN degree is going to be about 34 hours shorter than entering a new field. Having a BS is a personal goal for me, not professional.
    I think that's a really big reason I wanted my BS too. I already had an AS, my goal was to get the BS. It was a goal I was reaching for and was very happy and proud of myself that I finally achieved that goal.
  3. by   collegebound
    I also do not want my BSN. I will be perfectly happy with my ADN degree. I like many others do not wish to pursue my CRNA or other fields and honestly don't want to pay back the students loans. My CC is "cheap" and I'll be in debt enough by the time I am through here!
  4. by   imenid37
    I got my BSN by going back to school straight out of my ADN program in 1987 and finished in 1990, taking one class at a time. I am now taking one class at a time for my MSN. I think that there are some really great and really medicore nursing programs out there of all types. I don't think across the board the BSN beats the ADN or diploma, despite what the folks at the U of MD told me way back when! Now I am doing the job of clinical educator for my unit. Some of my best "educators" on staff are ADN's. It is not that they have no desire to learn. It may just be that they want more clinically based continuing ed. type activities rather than a formal degree. That is great. They are wonderful nurses. I wish there was a way for them to get credit for a degree from this type of education if they decide they want a degree in the future. I don't think you can find a smarter group of professionals who don't have a lot of advanced degrees,than you can in nursing. The knowledge base is very broad and ever chaging. I guess my point is, not wanting another degree, is not synonymous w/ not wanting to learn or expand one's horizons.
  5. by   icugirl33
    Hi,

    It's an individual choice to get an ADN or BSN. I got a BSN because I wanted to have a 4 year college degree,plain & simple. I'm happy I did because now I can quickly get the h**L out this crazy profession before it drives me nuts. (Law school Fall 07)
  6. by   zenman
    Quote from icugirl33
    Hi,

    It's an individual choice to get an ADN or BSN. I got a BSN because I wanted to have a 4 year college degree,plain & simple. I'm happy I did because now I can quickly get the h**L out this crazy profession before it drives me nuts. (Law school Fall 07)
    Check carefully...I've heard many lawyers describe their profession as the tops in drudgery!
  7. by   bethin
    I will be doing an associates program. I will most likely go back for a bachelor's but not because I want to be a nurse manager. My plan is to go to law school and I've learned that while you can have a bachelor's in anything (be it fashion design or landscaping) law schools are giving more attention to those that who are a nurse or a doctor.

    I think most people's goals are simply to be a nurse. You are an RN if you have an associates or a bachelors, so some think why bother. They achieved their career goal. Plus, in my area, RN's are paid the same whether they are diploma, associate, or bachelor's.
  8. by   zenman
    Quote from nursing4me23
    Thanks for all of you who replied.
    i wasn't trying to discourage anyone from getting their bsn at all
    i just wanted to see if not having it had stopped them in any way
    and i see that it hasn't. i wish all of you the best in whatever route
    you decide to take.
    :wink2:
    Our profession is different from others where more education is rewarded by increased earnings as well as other benefits.

    Perhaps we need to approach this from another angle. Since having more education doesn't result in higher pay in most cases, maybe we should decrease the amount of education in order to increase the benefit ratio. A 45K salary looks much better to a graduate of a 1 yr program than to a graduate of a 4 yr progam.

    I obtained an MSN in order to become a better bedside nurse (but have done educational and management), even though many think that further education is only for management or teaching. However, I originally became an RN after 1 yr of ARMY medic training, then challenged the the state boards and went to work in a Level I trauma center.

    So maybe we need to revamp the nursing programs and turn out 1 year grads...maybe somthing similar to the ARMY/NAVY medics or Special Forces medics. What do ya think?
    Last edit by zenman on Oct 31, '06
  9. by   JessicRN
    Quote from RunningWithScissors
    If I were to go back to school, it would not be for a BSN.

    Our clinical ladder rewards a Bachelor's degree, not necessarily a BSN.

    How about making yourself more marketable and get an advanced degree in something else (computer science, criminology, heck even forestry).

    Check into it and see if, for that extra pay, the degree MUST be in nursing!
    I had your same thinking 5 years ago and decided to go for my Graduate degree in Computer Information Systems. I got 5 courses short of my degree (I had received my Graduate certificate by then) and attempted to find a job. I found I could start at the ground floor for $36000 if I even got a job pretty much anyone who applies had to have experience since I did not I did ot have a chance in hell of getting a job. So here I am again. By the way I did checked in our facility it does not matter what the degree to get the extra pay but you only get $5.00 for no matter how many Baccalaureate degrees you have
  10. by   ZASHAGALKA
    Quote from zenman
    So maybe we need to revamp the nursing programs and turn out 1 year grads...maybe somthing similar to the ARMY/NAVY medics or Special Forces medics. What do ya think?
    Why mess with success? The ADN model has proven to be a highly successful 'entry to practice' model.

    And until we reach a non-sarcastic consensus on where to go in the future, that is where the issue will stay. Forty years should have taught us at least that much.

    So the question becomes: do we waste another 40 yrs on the same tired, polarized debate, or do we look at it from fresh perspectives?

    A real model that brings everybody along and removes the insults and taints COULD bring nursing to BSN entry in 10 yrs. Doctors did the same thing inside of 10 yrs with the Flexner Report in 1909.

    As it stands now, in 10 yrs, we will STILL be saying, "In 10 yrs, BSN will be the standard. . ." Just like we did in 1965. And 1978. And 1985. And 1992. And 2000.

    What we need is an incentive to move the issue along and not a strong-armed legislative fiat. And the issue must protect current stakeholders, such as today's ADNs and the community colleges that depend on the model. How about a fully articulated model, where all programs, CC and university are equally articulated, allowing CCs to benefit from 2 yrs of nursing education with automatic admissions to upper level university transfers, (would require active collaboration between CCs linked to Unis regarding admission space) and real pay differentials for BSN. Oh, and add to that an extra year of real and actual internships, financially supported by real 'teaching' environments. That would require ALL programs to adapt to create a unified model and would give no programs an elistist air. In other words, not just today's ADNs would need to be 'grandfathered', but today's BSNs as well. That would also serve to create the real investment in education that would both necessitate and justify the increase in salary and respect that such a move seeks. And, that could allow for another fully articulated model with education invested enough at the new '5 yr' BSN level to outline a move to NP/ANP with 2 yrs further education a reality and would serve to foster an eventual move to NP entry to practice. What you'd end up with would be two educational pathways: 5 yr RN, and 7 yr NP. THAT would create the equal playing field that would lead to the respect sought, and it could be done without leaving anybody behind.

    ~faith,
    Timothy.
    Last edit by ZASHAGALKA on Oct 31, '06
  11. by   zenman
    Quote from ZASHAGALKA
    Why mess with success? The ADN model has proven to be a highly successful 'entry to practice' model.

    ~faith,
    Timothy.
    I agree with most of your comments but do we know the above is correct? The ADN was created to correct a nursing shortage. Has it succeeded in that aspect?

    The OP wanted to know if there are any adn's out there who have no desire to get bsn's basically because "adn's are just as effective or maybe sometimes more than a bsn." So how do we know her statement true? If it is correct, and as you say "highly successful," maybe we can even "streamline" nursing education further. If I was a hotshot nurse with a year of training...and I'm no smarter than anyone else...why not go for it?
  12. by   Retired R.N.
    Quote from zenman
    Our profession is different from others where more education is rewarded by increased earnings as well as other benefits.

    Perhaps we need to approach this from another angle. Since having more education doesn't result in higher pay in most cases, maybe we should decrease the amount of education in order to increase the benefit ratio. A 45K salary looks much better to a graduate of a 1 yr program than to a graduate of a 4 yr progam.

    I obtained an MSN in order to become a better bedside nurse (but have done educational and management), even though many think that further education is only for management or teaching. However, I originally became an RN after 1 yr of ARMY medic training, then challenged the the state boards and went to work in a Level I trauma center.

    So maybe we need to revamp the nursing programs and turn out 1 year grads...maybe somthing similar to the ARMY/NAVY medics or Special Forces medics. What do ya think?
    Zenman,

    Could you please give us more information about this medic training? Is this a clearly defined program with specific components divided between classroom and clinical experience, or is one just assigned to a medic's position with the assumption that on-the-job training will follow? If it is a fixed-length program, what tangible benefits are there for the students at various stages or after completing it? Promotions? Pay raises?
  13. by   angel337
    Quote from zenman
    I agree with most of your comments but do we know the above is correct? The ADN was created to correct a nursing shortage. Has it succeeded in that aspect?

    The OP wanted to know if there are any adn's out there who have no desire to get bsn's basically because "adn's are just as effective or maybe sometimes more than a bsn." So how do we know her statement true? If it is correct, and as you say "highly successful," maybe we can even "streamline" nursing education further. If I was a hotshot nurse with a year of training...and I'm no smarter than anyone else...why not go for it?
    i totally agree with you zenman. and this is why i think this whole way of thinking is embarrassing to the nursing profession.

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