Questions from a recent grad Questions from a recent grad | allnurses

Questions from a recent grad

  1. 0 Hello everyone,

    As I mentioned in my 1st post, I'm a recent grad & newly licensed RN and I have a few questions about the next steps.

    1) When is the best time to apply for my malpractice insurance?

    2) I'm not an expert on RN job benefits...what am I looking for?

    3) Any idea how many CEUs I'd need as a NJ RN?

    4) Should I be worried that I didn't retain EVERYTHING from nursing school?

    I know that I'm probably overwhelming myself but I'm sure I'm not the first new nurse to stumble onto this site seeking guidance lol

    Any advice that anyone can give would be much appreciated
  2. 16 Comments

  3. Visit  JaimeAnne,RN profile page
    0
    Also, am I taking just CPR to get recertified, BLS, ACLS? I'm so confused....please help
  4. Visit  April13RN profile page
    0
    1) Anytime, even some nursing schools require that you purchase it. I bought mine two years after I graduated.

    2) At least health and dental, possibly vision if you need it. In some states you may be covered by your parents insurance until you're 26.

    3) In MA you need 15 contact hours for CEUs but it varies by state so check the NJ BON website.

    4) It would be impossible to retain everything you learned from nursing school, once you find a job they will train you and you will be able to fine tune your skills to suit your job.
  5. Visit  AlisRN profile page
    0
    when renewing for your CPR, go for the ACLS instead of BLS.

    And I'm also in MA - so try here... http://www.ehow.com/list_6643901_new...uirements.html
  6. Visit  ChuckeRN profile page
    0
    ACLS and BLS are 2 different classes/certifications. You should have gotten your BLS while still in school as a part of being in the hospital during your clinicals.

    You may need a re-cert after 2 years, IIRC. Some ACLS certification classes will often include a BLS re-cert so you should ask. Also, most hospitals require ACLS classes certified by the American Heart Association, so again, ask.
    Quote from AlisRN
    when renewing for your CPR, go for the ACLS instead of BLS.

    And I'm also in MA - so try here... http://www.ehow.com/list_6643901_new...uirements.html
  7. Visit  turnforthenurse profile page
    0
    Quote from ChuckeRN
    ACLS and BLS are 2 different classes/certifications. You should have gotten your BLS while still in school as a part of being in the hospital during your clinicals.

    You may need a re-cert after 2 years, IIRC. Some ACLS certification classes will often include a BLS re-cert so you should ask. Also, most hospitals require ACLS classes certified by the American Heart Association, so again, ask.
    Yes, you will need BOTH. Although ACLS includes BLS, just because you are ACLS certified doesn't mean you will be BLS certified. Most jobs require ACLS certification within the first 6 months-1 year on the job, and most of the time those classes are offered at little to no cost for employees. Although ACLS is a good resume builder, I would maybe wait, because those classes are expensive! I would have at least your BLS, though.

    1) I would apply for malpractice insurance now. It's never too early. Definitely get it before you start working, though, and shop around. NSO is a popular site, but I went through Proliability - cheaper premiums for more coverage ($1M/$6M for I think $60 with Proliability as opposed to $100,000/$600,000 for $120 through NSO). Rates vary by state. You will get a discount your first year as a new grad.

    2) Health, dental, vision, retirement if you need it. Full-time offers those benefits as does part-time, but I think some institutions do not offer benefits for part-time employees. I have never seen benefits offered to PRN employees but again, it varies by institution.

    3) You will have to contact your board for more details, because each state is different. In Texas, you are exempt from having to do CNE when you renew for the first time. Afterwards, it's 20 contact hours; each CEU = 10 contact hours. Also make sure that your CEU's are recognized by your state board of nursing.

    4) Absolutely not! That is impossible, and myself and everyone here will tell you that nursing school isn't the same as real world nursing! They are actually quite different. You do not really learn "how" to be a nurse until you start working as one. Nursing school gives you the knowledge, but a lot of that knowledge also comes with the job.
  8. Visit  ckh23 profile page
    0
    Quote from JaimeAnne,RN
    Hello everyone,

    As I mentioned in my 1st post, I'm a recent grad & newly licensed RN and I have a few questions about the next steps.

    1) When is the best time to apply for my malpractice insurance?

    2) I'm not an expert on RN job benefits...what am I looking for?

    3) Any idea how many CEUs I'd need as a NJ RN?

    4) Should I be worried that I didn't retain EVERYTHING from nursing school?

    I know that I'm probably overwhelming myself but I'm sure I'm not the first new nurse to stumble onto this site seeking guidance lol

    Any advice that anyone can give would be much appreciated
    I'm going to skip all of the other questions because the previous posts did a very good job answering them.

    3. NJ requires 30 CEUs every two years. The state does random auditing of nurses to ensure compliance. Here is a link to the NJ BON and a letter about the CEUs.

    http://www.state.nj.us/lps/ca/nursing/index.htm

    http://www.state.nj.us/lps/ca/nursin...r_ltr_0207.pdf
  9. Visit  PMFB-RN profile page
    0
    Quote from JaimeAnne,RN
    Hello everyone,

    As I mentioned in my 1st post, I'm a recent grad & newly licensed RN and I have a few questions about the next steps.

    1) When is the best time to apply for my malpractice insurance?

    2) I'm not an expert on RN job benefits...what am I looking for?

    3) Any idea how many CEUs I'd need as a NJ RN?

    4) Should I be worried that I didn't retain EVERYTHING from nursing school?

    I know that I'm probably overwhelming myself but I'm sure I'm not the first new nurse to stumble onto this site seeking guidance lol

    Any advice that anyone can give would be much appreciated
    *** For Hospital nursing you should NOT buy malpractice insurance. It just makes you are target. I have been involved as a witness in a couple malpractice suits.
    Forgetting what you learned in nursing school is normal and expected and desirable. It will be replaced with information and skills actually useful for RNs as you gain experience.
  10. Visit  netglow profile page
    0
    Buy the insurance. Your corporation will advise you not to because they think you are not intelligent enough to make your own decisions. Sorry, but that's the way they roll. Like to keep you barefoot and what was it? Works well for them.
  11. Visit  nurseprnRN profile page
    2
    about the insurance? if the hospital tells you they cover you, they might, but it's only a half-truth. if you make an error for which their insurance pays a judgment or settlement (not the hospital-- you don't think hospitals pay, do you? no, they have insurance for that) the insurance company is legally entitled to turn around and recover their loss from ...you. the hospital will not say, "oh, don't go after suzie q, she's such a nice girl," believe me.

    also, if there is a lawsuit, the hospital attorney is just that, the hospital's attorney. trust me, he will not hesitate to throw you under the bus, because you are not his client. your malpractice insurance will pay for (and in many cases provide) an attorney to you, because it is in their interest to defend you.

    this is all old news to us old people, but new grads need to know this. nso is a good company; there are others. ask the agent whether it covers you for actions only while the policy is active (while you are still paying the premiums) or whether it covers actions occurring in the time period when premium was being paid, whether or not the policy is still in force. makes a difference.
    turnforthenurse and ObtundedRN like this.
  12. Visit  turnforthenurse profile page
    0
    Quote from grntea
    about the insurance? if the hospital tells you they cover you, they might, but it's only a half-truth. if you make an error for which their insurance pays a judgment or settlement (not the hospital-- you don't think hospitals pay, do you? no, they have insurance for that) the insurance company is legally entitled to turn around and recover their loss from ...you. the hospital will not say, "oh, don't go after suzie q, she's such a nice girl," believe me.

    also, if there is a lawsuit, the hospital attorney is just that, the hospital's attorney. trust me, he will not hesitate to throw you under the bus, because you are not his client. your malpractice insurance will pay for (and in many cases provide) an attorney to you, because it is in their interest to defend you.

    this is all old news to us old people, but new grads need to know this. nso is a good company; there are others. ask the agent whether it covers you for actions only while the policy is active (while you are still paying the premiums) or whether it covers actions occurring in the time period when premium was being paid, whether or not the policy is still in force. makes a difference.
    this.

    and to give you another example, say you're working at x hospital, you've been there for awhile; then you decide to leave for whatever reason. you get hired at y hospital. 3 years later you're still working at y hospital, but now you get called into court because of something that happened while you were at x hospital. if you do not have your own malpractice insurance, you will not be covered under x hospital or their attorney, and companies will do anything for their benefit, including throwing you under the bus if it benefits them.

    in short, yes, purchasing malpractice insurance is strongly recommended, including hospital nurses.
  13. Visit  Calixan profile page
    0
    Quote from AlisRN
    when renewing for your CPR, go for the ACLS instead of BLS.

    And I'm also in MA - so try here... http://www.ehow.com/list_6643901_new...uirements.html
    You need BLS in order to get ACLS. So renew your BLS if it's expired and then do ACLS. I personally would work for a few months before doing ACLS, it kind of helps to have a few skills in place and glance and try to read some of the EKGs on your patients charts and learn the rythms. A lot of jobs don't require ACLS. Mainly ER, ICU, Surg, Etc. Usually just general med floors don't require it but if they do, they will usually pay for you to take the course. I would ask the company you are working for (are about to work for soon). Oh and you won't remember everything from nursing school, no worries. You will be fine!
  14. Visit  JaimeAnne,RN profile page
    0
    Thank you for all of your replies & advice. I will certainly keep my eyes out for the BLS renewal course & will see if ACLS is needed for wherever I apply

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