New grad, need tips..

Nurses New Nurse

Published

Hello,

I am a new grad RN, will be starting this 12 week mentorship program in nursing resource team (float, but told mostly in medicine, surgery unit). I will be preceptored for 12 weeks. I am excited but VERY anxious and scared. I have never worked in a medicine floor before, my clinicals were mostly in palliative and rehab unit so I am very sure the learning curve will be big. Any tips for a new grad? Like on organization, time management, dos and don'ts before I start my position in a month?

TIA

Specializes in Telemetry Med/Surg.

Ask a lot of questions... ask a lot of "why" questions. For example, you may have an order to insert a Foley catheter but you need to know why you're inserting it. That will help develop your critical thinking. And write everything down. Some preceptors don't like to repeat themselves. There's a journal my orientee is using that has some good tips in it.  I'll ask where she got it. 

MJJFan1 said:

Ask a lot of questions... ask a lot of "why" questions. For example, you may have an order to insert a Foley catheter but you need to know why you're inserting it. That will help develop your critical thinking. And write everything down. Some preceptors don't like to repeat themselves. There's a journal my orientee is using that has some good tips in it.  I'll ask where she got it. 

Thank you! I'll get a mini notebook and yes please, I would really appreciate it.

Specializes in Telemetry Med/Surg.
Toaster2k18 said:

Thank you! I'll get a mini notebook and yes please, I would really appreciate it.

Amazon (of course) https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0D21PCZN8/ref=cx_skuctr_share?smid=A3IP4GMZYNKCF6

Specializes in Postpartum/Public Health.

Starting a new grad RN position can be both exciting and nerve-wracking, especially with the prospect of a 12-week mentorship program in a nursing resource team. Given your background in palliative and rehab units, transitioning to a medicine and surgery floor might indeed present a steep learning curve. However, you can ease into this new role by focusing on organization, time management, and effective communication. Stay organized by keeping track of tasks, patient information, and schedules either through a planner or digital tools. Ask your buddy nurses if they have any good cheat sheets that use on the floor that you can use.

Prioritize tasks based on urgency and importance to manage your time effectively, and don't hesitate to reach out for help or clarification when needed. It's essential to be proactive, ask questions, seek feedback, and take care of yourself both mentally and physically during this transition.

Additionally, don't be afraid to admit when you don't know something, it's better to ask questions versus make a mistake and compromise the safety of your patient. Also avoid overcommitting yourself to prevent burnout, I know the OT sounds worth it, but make sure you are physically and mentally able to do the extra work. You don't want to overdue it in your first year!  You got this!

Julia Liou said:

Starting a new grad RN position can be both exciting and nerve-wracking, especially with the prospect of a 12-week mentorship program in a nursing resource team. Given your background in palliative and rehab units, transitioning to a medicine and surgery floor might indeed present a steep learning curve. However, you can ease into this new role by focusing on organization, time management, and effective communication. Stay organized by keeping track of tasks, patient information, and schedules either through a planner or digital tools. Ask your buddy nurses if they have any good cheat sheets that use on the floor that you can use.

Prioritize tasks based on urgency and importance to manage your time effectively, and don't hesitate to reach out for help or clarification when needed. It's essential to be proactive, ask questions, seek feedback, and take care of yourself both mentally and physically during this transition.

Additionally, don't be afraid to admit when you don't know something, it's better to ask questions versus make a mistake and compromise the safety of your patient. Also avoid overcommitting yourself to prevent burnout, I know the OT sounds worth it, but make sure you are physically and mentally able to do the extra work. You don't want to overdue it in your first year!  You got this!

Thank you for your tips. May I know how your experience was in a medicine/surgical unit if you worked in those unit? I'll definitely be asking questions and all that.

+ Add a Comment