Problems a CNA May Face

by kacie.knyvett 9,083 Views | 10 Comments

The problems faced by a CNA on daily work environment are myriad that stem out either from the fear of competition, political issues or self-esteem. Horizontal violence or bullying is the most common. Here are a few ways to handle them.

  1. 1

    Problems a CNA May Face

    Though I may not consider myself as highly experienced certified nursing assistant, but my three-years of working have taught me a lot about the other side of this occupation. In this short span of career, I have faced many problems. Maybe, there are some more to come for me to handle it. For now, just out of the sense of camaraderie, I though about sharing my experiences on problems I faced initially, and how I got over it.

    Any new job be it first or the last is always exciting, and it comes with a lot of skepticism. You are excited and raring to go as well as nervous thinking how the new staff would treat you, or whether you would beable to cope with the work environment or not. And when the job is ofan entry-level like the nursing aide, lots of emotions creep into the mind.

    As a certified nursing assistant, you will start facing problems that stem out of sheer competition among equal rank positions. Your colleague, though holding same designation and pay will try to treat you as a junior, even if he or she might have joined just a couple of months before you. To keep with the self-esteem of being senior, the fellow workers may start poking their nose in everything you do, or try to kill your confidence.

    There are several problems you will face at daily work environment. The most common ishorizontal violence or bullying. These terms are related to any displeasing behaviors mete out to one colleague by another. This could be insulting or criticizing you in presence of a patient. This unprofessional act is easily recognizable. Bullying can also be indirect in cases where you are not counted or included in any teamwork.

    What I did to handle these odd conducts against me was to increase the level of communication with the staff. I tried to build up relationships with other nurses. Whenever any nurse dropped in wearing a beautiful dress, I appreciate it. I used to set reminders on my cell phone about the important dates of people working with me such as birthdays, anniversaries, and other small events. When the day arrived, even though I had a share in the staff contribution, I still used to present them with a separate gift. Slowly, the people started recognizing me because nothing bridges the gap better than gifts.

    Second in the list of problems you will face will come through the higher level. Though you may never have direct contacts with the nurses grabbing a higher position on the hierarchy of the setting, sometimes they will try to find in you a scapegoat so that they can impose any of their failureon you without any second thought. The problem can cost your job. To prepare for such incidence, you must make a few good and trusted friends among your staff who can boldly testify for you.

    These are just few ofthe common problems CNA has to face on the job. The severity, frequency and reasons may vary though. To stand clean and tall, I will suggest you to create an identity of your own with your nature.Try to share problems of fellow workers they are going through in their personal lives. If you are able to offer even a single solution that can work for them, you will surely make a place in their heart.
    Last edit by Joe V on Mar 7, '13
    Joe V likes this.
  2. Read more articles from kacie.knyvett

  3. About kacie.knyvett

    #Kacie is a certified nurse aide from Fargo, ND working in a local clinic. As an independent researcher, she writes different articles on many CNA topics. https://twitter.com/KacieKnyvett

    kacie.knyvett joined Apr '12 - from 'Fargo, ND'. kacie.knyvett has '3+' year(s) of experience and specializes in 'a well adopted CNA'. Posts: 6 Likes: 8; Learn more about kacie.knyvett by visiting their allnursesPage Twitter


    Find Similar Topics

    10 Comments so far...

  4. 0
    Interesting article, but you didn't mention understanding office politics and workflow.
    A lot of times people will enter into a new job with the intent of working their butts off to make a good impression or prove that the right choice was made in hiring them. However, their new co-workers may already have a preferred pace to work at to avoid injury and burn-out (highly likely even for new CNAs).
    Or you may see the reverse. A new CNA may be slow to act independently or hesitant about causing harm to a patient while their co-workers are flying through tasks since there is an endless list of duties to finish. Spending "too much" time at your own pace and not the group pace can quickly lead to resentment (justified or not) and co-workers distancing themselves form a new hire.
  5. 0
    As a new CNA, I had to deal with the harassment and bullying real bad at my facility. Aides were constantly talking down to me, giving me dirty looks, refusing to help, badmouthing me, all because I was new and inexperienced and therefore slower than them. There were even a few times I was cussed out and screamed at. It got to the point where I was so fed up with the hazing that I quit and now I'm wishing I hadn't. I wish I had stuck with it and gotten better at the job, but it's too late to go back on my decision now. I'm technically still employed at the facility as PRN (because the DoN wanted me to come back) but my hours are so minimal I may as well not be employed there anymore.
  6. 2
    It is a shame we women cannot work together; why is there such hatred between women? It is time to get used to the cattiness of the nursing field.
    havehope and stardust80916 like this.
  7. 1
    I'm glad I don't have that problem. We all help each other on my floor. Sure, we have disagreements here and there, but at the end of the day we have each other's backs. I couldn't survive without the other techs!
    1feistymama likes this.
  8. 2
    Quote from kacie.knyvett

    As a certified nursing assistant, you will start facing problems that stem out of sheer competition among equal rank positions. Your colleague, though holding same designation and pay will try to treat you as a junior, even if he or she might have joined just a couple of months before you. To keep with the self-esteem of being senior, the fellow workers may start poking their nose in everything you do, or try to kill your confidence.

    There are several problems you will face at daily work environment. The most common ishorizontal violence or bullying. These terms are related to any displeasing behaviors mete out to one colleague by another. This could be insulting or criticizing you in presence of a patient. This unprofessional act is easily recognizable. Bullying can also be indirect in cases where you are not counted or included in any teamwork.

    What I did to handle these odd conducts against me was to increase the level of communication with the staff. I tried to build up relationships with other nurses. Whenever any nurse dropped in wearing a beautiful dress, I appreciate it. I used to set reminders on my cell phone about the important dates of people working with me such as birthdays, anniversaries, and other small events. When the day arrived, even though I had a share in the staff contribution, I still used to present them with a separate gift. Slowly, the people started recognizing me because nothing bridges the gap better than gifts.

    Second in the list of problems you will face will come through the higher level. Though you may never have direct contacts with the nurses grabbing a higher position on the hierarchy of the setting, sometimes they will try to find in you a scapegoat so that they can impose any of their failureon you without any second thought. The problem can cost your job. To prepare for such incidence, you must make a few good and trusted friends among your staff who can boldly testify for you.

    These are just few ofthe common problems CNA has to face on the job. The severity, frequency and reasons may vary though. To stand clean and tall, I will suggest you to create an identity of your own with your nature.Try to share problems of fellow workers they are going through in their personal lives. If you are able to offer even a single solution that can work for them, you will surely make a place in their heart.

    "Displeasing behaviors" mete out from one colleague to another is not bullying. Criticizing or belittling you in front of a patient MAY be. But if someone is trying to prevent you from hurting the patient, they may have to speak up -- and criticize you -- in front of the patient. It would be lovely if people could always pull you away from the bedside before pointing out something you're doing wrong, and most of us try to do that, but it's just not always possible. Yelling at you may be bullying -- or it may you being hypersensitive to the tone of voice your colleague is using, or it may be you being unused to receiving negative feedback. Just because you don't LIKE the way a colleague is interacting with you does not make it bullying.

    Increasing communication with your colleagues will go a long way toward improving working relationships and teamwork, but I'm not sure I'd advocate buying gifts for all your co-workers. I have over 100 colleagues -- that would be approximately two birthday gifts a week. Not gonna happen.

    I also take issue with the idea that "nurses grabbing a higher position on the hierarchy of the setting sometimes will try to find in you a scapegoat so that they can impose any of their failure on you without a second thought." I don't believe that most people are going to go around trying to scapegoat the CNA for their own failures. Nurses especially will have failures outside your scope of practice, so can't scapegoat you. IF it were true that nurses go around trying to scapegoat CNAs, the best way to prepare for it would be to do your job as best you can so that everyone sees you as an exemplary CNA.

    I truly believe that if you interact with people expecting the best from them, that's what you're gonna get. And if you go looking for bad behavior, you're going to find it whether it actually exists or not. You might as well expect the best from people.
    1feistymama and nikkidevries like this.
  9. 6
    Based on experience, in all fields of work or profession, there will always be some good and bad apples...and life is survival...being a CNA is the best humbling experience one can ever have...but cheer up! - They may not be paid well enough for the hard wok they do which means seconds interval before helping another patient or resident _ so little pay yet so much credits in heaven. Service in Love.
  10. 0
    PCP or PCW- depending on company and state are treated even worse than CNAs. We're looked down upon for our seemingly lack of knowledge in the medical field. I for one choose to be different and pay close attention to what my CNAs, LPNs, and RNs have to say and absorb that information like a sponge. I know all that all that experience and information gained will only help me in nursing school. Although, it is a hindrance now because I have the knowledge, yet I am unable to use it.
  11. 1
    I enjoyed your article...you have some good ideas on surviving as a new CNA. I understand wanting to gain a workplace ally or two, however I personally would not give free compliments or gifts to get on their good side. The way I see it, as a new employee I've already been interviewed and hired...I don't have to make co-workers accept me or allow myself to be hazed or initiated by them. I find that workplace bullying exists in every profession. I know of an anesthesiologist who told me how a seasoned orthopedic surgeon bullied him as a new resident. Not constructive criticism or tough training, but bullying and harrassment. So, I guess miserable co-workers are everywhere...misery loves company. If I am a new employee I am friendly and cordial. However, I let it be known from day one that I'm confident, not intimidated, and have a thick skin. I take constructive criticism well, so I can learn as much as possible. I pretty much just clock-in, do my job, mind by business, clock out. It's nice to make friends at work...but ultimately I'm there to work, not make friends. I notice being female and from my experience that some females at the workplace start and keep drama going...I never experience bullying from male co-workers.
    TurtleCat likes this.
  12. 0
    All you people make me scared to become a CNA, but I'm gonna do it anyway. If I'm doing something the wrong way, I don't mind being told about it in a respectful way. I'm not there to be your best friend, I'm there to do a job, and If I call out for help with a patient and you don't help because you don't like me, well.... SHAME on YOU!... for not thinking about the patient first.

    I just pray to god that when I am done with school and start looking for a job as a CNA, that I find a place that work together as a team because without team work, the ones that suffer in the end will be the patients.


Top