CNA's/PCT's how much do you make? - page 10

I have a couple interviews for PCT positions, but I have no idea what to expect as a salary. I am a student nurse in NE FL. Please tell me where you live, your experience, and how much you make. I know I will probably have to... Read More

  1. 1
    Quote from backatit2
    i went to an interview for a PCT job where i was expecting to be offered at LEAST 9-10 dollars per hour. she said it paid MINIMUM WAGE = 7.25 per hour. i have a degree and 10 years of work experience (neither in nursing) and still was offered 7.25 - sickening!

    i had a job at the time so i declined. i would've left my job had it paid more bc i wanted to start working in a hospital and get some experience, but i couldn't afford to take a pay cut and i was SHOCKED they pay people doing such hard/important work so little.
    Tee hee=If President Obama started slinging bedpans he'd get paid the same rate as any other cna.Work experience and education in another field means exactly zip when you are starting out in a new one....
    JDZ344 likes this.

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  2. 0
    Quote from ktwlpn
    Tee hee=If President Obama started slinging bedpans he'd get paid the same rate as any other cna.Work experience and education in another field means exactly zip when you are starting out in a new one....
    that's actually not true. work history (even in another field) and especially when you've had years of a track record of showing up on time, not calling in, etc. DO count for something. education also typically counts for the mere fact that it shows you have some level of dedication compared to an 18 year old who has never had a job before and has a GED. it just so happens in my area, there are not many jobs other than restaurant jobs so there isn't a real shortage for CNA's as many people go that route. they had 100 other applicants who WOULD do the job for 7.25 so there was no need to offer me more.

    however, this isn't always the case - it depends on where you live and what the applicant pool/turnover rate is like.
  3. 0
    Quote from backatit2
    that's actually not true. work history (even in another field) and especially when you've had years of a track record of showing up on time, not calling in, etc.
    Not in nursing. It all depends on years of experience in the field. I've had 4 years of experience as an LPN and 2 1/2 years as an EMT-IV. Those years of experience matter absolutely zip when it comes to my RN pay rate. I may have a better shot at getting a job with that background, but the pay rate is just going to be based on my RN experience. Some facilities even have a chart that HR goes by, with little or no negotiating on starting pay.

    I've even worked on a dual diagnosis (mental health/substance abuse) where the psych techs with BA Psych were paid the same rate as a tech with no degree. It just came down to years of experience. It made no sense to me, as you would think that years in university count as years of experience, but the jobs for those with a BA in Psych in this area are almost nil, so the hospital knew that they could get away with it. It was a really bad situation for those that worked so hard for their degrees.
  4. 1
    OMG!!! I am surprised at the low pay rates in other states....!! I've been a CNA for merly 4yrs. in California and I make $22.05 plus 25% per diem differential, which makes it what??? Almost $27!!! Big difference....
    mshaw23 likes this.
  5. 0
    Quote from alisant
    Anyone know how much CNAs make in Louisville, Ky? I just got certified and I'm looking for a job
    I'm in Louisville, make 11.00 an hour PRN, no benefits. One year experience.
  6. 1
    Quote from Reed84
    OMG!!! I am surprised at the low pay rates in other states....!! I've been a CNA for merly 4yrs. in California and I make $22.05 plus 25% per diem differential, which makes it what??? Almost $27!!! Big difference....
    Yes, but look at the cost of living where you are. I am an RN (recent grad) and make (only, lol) $25.72 /hr compared to your $22. But my 2 BR apt in a nice complex with 2 pools, jacuzzi, 2 weight rooms, etc, is $787/month. How much is yours?

    Nurse Student86 likes this.
  7. 2
    Quote from DC Collins
    Yes, but look at the cost of living where you are. I am an RN (recent grad) and make (only, lol) $25.72 /hr compared to your $22. But my 2 BR apt in a nice complex with 2 pools, jacuzzi, 2 weight rooms, etc, is $787/month. How much is yours?

    But it all depends on what you value. The biggest mistakes people make (especially young 20-somethings) are when they fixate on either their wage, cost of living, or quality of life. All 3 need to be considered, not just one factor alone.

    I have no idea where you live or how old you are so this is just an example:

    You have one person who brags about how high his/her wage is in comparison to the rest of the country and he/she enjoys all of the amenities involved with living in an exciting place like San Francisco. Their wages might be high but they live in an apartment or condo that others would not consider as a suitable home.

    You have another who brags about their fabulous home or apartment and how many bells and whistles it has, yet they live in the boring suburbs of some rustbelt city in the cold midwest or northeast.

    The San Francisco type person would never trade their tiny studio apartment for a home with a yard or a bigger apartment with hot tubs and work out rooms because they don't want their life to be about going to yet another chain restaurant or mall, in addition to scraping ice off their windshield every morning before going to work. They may want to hang out in cool clubs or go to plays or hit the latest new restaurant that just opened down the street.

    The person in the rustbelt suburbs may value and want other things in life, like good schools for their kids, a nice yard, a home with new appliances and pretty hardwood floors, etc.

    Your best place to live is not necessarily where you grew up, nor is it the city that pays the highest wages, but a carefully thought out plan of what you value in life.

    Your wage might be high in one city but not give you what you want in life, or it may be lower in another city yet meet your needs much better than the higher paying town.
    RUBY2623RN and student forever like this.
  8. 0
    Quote from RN34TX
    But it all depends on what you value. The biggest mistakes people make (especially young 20-somethings) are when they fixate on either their wage, cost of living, or quality of life. All 3 need to be considered, not just one factor alone.

    I have no idea where you live or how old you are so this is just an example:

    You have one person who brags about how high his/her wage is in comparison to the rest of the country and he/she enjoys all of the amenities involved with living in an exciting place like San Francisco. Their wages might be high but they live in an apartment or condo that others would not consider as a suitable home.

    You have another who brags about their fabulous home or apartment and how many bells and whistles it has, yet they live in the boring suburbs of some rustbelt city in the cold midwest or northeast.

    The San Francisco type person would never trade their tiny studio apartment for a home with a yard or a bigger apartment with hot tubs and work out rooms because they don't want their life to be about going to yet another chain restaurant or mall, in addition to scraping ice off their windshield every morning before going to work. They may want to hang out in cool clubs or go to plays or hit the latest new restaurant that just opened down the street.

    The person in the rustbelt suburbs may value and want other things in life, like good schools for their kids, a nice yard, a home with new appliances and pretty hardwood floors, etc.

    Your best place to live is not necessarily where you grew up, nor is it the city that pays the highest wages, but a carefully thought out plan of what you value in life.

    Your wage might be high in one city but not give you what you want in life, or it may be lower in another city yet meet your needs much better than the higher paying town.
    This is very true. I'm not a nurse yet, but I was told by HR that the local hospital pays $18 an hour to new RNs. Compared to many other parts of the country, that is very low, but it's a higher wage than most people here make (and it's only the starting wage).

    That will be plenty for ME because I have a husband who has a decent paying job, we own our house, and we both grew up here and went to the schools are children are/will be going to. I have no desire to move. Plus, people from the west coast and the NE have moved here because the need for nurses is high. I've even seen someone on this board say they moved here from CA for a job. Not to mention, I have a teaching degree and the only people who currently have jobs that graduated with my class are people who moved out of the area. Even with having to return to school and having loan payments, the "low wage" is worth it.
  9. 0
    Quote from DC Collins
    Yes, but look at the cost of living where you are. I am an RN (recent grad) and make (only, lol) $25.72 /hr compared to your $22. But my 2 BR apt in a nice complex with 2 pools, jacuzzi, 2 weight rooms, etc, is $787/month. How much is yours?


    Yes, to live in California, especially San Jose-San Francisco area is VERY expensive. I've lived here all my life and I've adjusted to the cost and honestly couldn't see myself living anywhere else. $787 for a 2bd period is a Great deal, but adding all those anemities is a major plus for the price. Here, to get all that would run you at LEAST $1300.00- $1650.00/month!!! Not to mention, I am recently divorced and raising two kids while going to school, so how much I make is a major concern here in California. But again, I couldn't imagine living anywhere else...I love it here!!:heartbeat
  10. 1
    Sadly CNA/PCT pay in many areas of the United States can be, well let us say "less than generous".

    Nursing homes and LTCs often fall towards the bottom of the scale. There is a nursing home up the street from me, and I routinely see their nusing assistants (most of whom are immigrants (nothing wrong with this, am just saying), going through trash bags for recycling.

    The story no one is really talking about in healthcare is about how the poor working conditions/wages of nursing assistants causes constant turnover of staff. This is very bad for nursing homes and LTCs because the facility, patients and staff must adapt to a constant revolving door of staff. The elderly in particular are sensitive to people being here one week, then gone the next.

    If you think finding persons to fill the ranks of licensed nurses is difficult, one can only imagine what it must be like for aides. Between various federal, state and local madates in terms of education and backround, coupled with the physical nature of the work, all for wages that often aren't much better than one finds at MacDonald's in some cases.
    student forever likes this.


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