Jump to content

You're not going to pull that on me

Posted

Specializes in Neonatal.

So, mostly I lurk off an on here on allnurses (as you can tell from my lack of posts yet years of membership) but in the spirit of calling for more threads to share stories with I thought I would start this. In fact, it was my first thought of a story when I saw the title for the Not Today Satan, Not Today thread.

What are your favorite stories of not letting patients and/or their families pull one over on you?

For example, mine:

I was just back from maternity leave so I wasn't familiar to this family (NICU so many with long stays) whose reputation, as I was told, was to try to cause trouble. Clearly all of my coworkers had done their time and as I was back it was my turn. The mother used the morning to feel me out, commenting on how she didn't know me, wondering about my experience (all questions that were easy to answer), etc. Really the usual for a family.

During the morning, we had discussed what labs had been drawn on the infant, including labs to be sent out. It was clear that the family knew all about the labs, they had been well planned in advance, and they were interested in when they would be able to expect results. No big deal. Family goes to lunch and I wonder what all the warnings were about.

When the mom came back to the bedside after lunch, she looked like she was on a mission and confronted me with this statement:

"You know, all those labs that you all took on my baby this morning, I never signed consent for you to do them;" as took a stance that stated she was ready to see me falter and stutter over a reply.

Without I pause, I looked straight at her and stated, "actually you did, as part of the consent for treatment that you signed when your little one was admitted."

Her eyes widened as she let out a little defeated sigh and walked back out of the unit. Nothing else was ever said about that interaction, although there were quite a few others that came from her.

All I could think during that interaction was you're not going to pull that on me.

~Mi Vida Loca~RN, ASN, RN

Specializes in Emergency Dept. Trauma. Pediatrics. Has 6 years experience.

Great thread! I am off to bed so I will have to think on this tomorrow to contribute, but I just wanted to say congrats on jumping in and good for you for standing up for yourself in that situation. What the heck is wrong with people? Just kidding, I learned to stop asking that question a long time ago. lol

canoehead, BSN, RN

Specializes in ER. Has 30 years experience.

I was working in the ER and got a sobbing patient in pain. She was taken right back to a room, but had to wait 30minutes to see a doc and get orders. I went in intermittently to check on her, get water and Kleenex. Thirty minutes of sobbing loudly and moaning, not one single tear, no snot, no red eyes. She was as dry and fresh as if she had just come in from outside. Geez lady, you gotta put some effort into this...pull a nose hair out or something.

JBudd, MSN

Specializes in Trauma, Teaching. Has 39 years experience.

We get a lot in triage; we diagnosis it as "staticus dramaticus".

Penelope_Pitstop, BSN, RN

Has 13 years experience.

"I figured out why my Dilaudid makes me sick to my stomach. It's because you all push it too slowly. If you slam it in, I feel just fine!"

I really hope no one on my floor fell for that line. As she said it, I nodded and pushed slower.

canoehead, BSN, RN

Specializes in ER. Has 30 years experience.

An ER patient in his 20's with no know medical issues c/o not being able to feel his feet at all. He walked in, but lost the ability to ambulate when he didn't get the requested Percocet. We let him sit there for about an hour looking at four walls, and amazingly, he walked out.(but with a limp)

Actually I have one not nursing related. I was volunteering at the Humane Society and a woman walked in to surrender her small dog. She'd had the animal for a few months, but stated she was unable to take him for walks because she had broken her ankle. No cast, no limp, and no sense of responsibility, apparently.

canoehead, BSN, RN

Specializes in ER. Has 30 years experience.

Multiple instances of people needing to be bumped ahead in the ER triage because they had an appointment (including a doctor's appointment) or had to go to work. The best one was a lady that needed to get to Walmart before it closed. No one sees the absurdity of needing to bump ahead of a dying ER patient because they HAVE to get to work.

I have a feeling I'll be coming back to this thread, lol!

Multiple instances of people needing to be bumped ahead in the ER triage because they had an appointment (including a doctor's appointment) or had to go to work. The best one was a lady that needed to get to Walmart before it closed. No one sees the absurdity of needing to bump ahead of a dying ER patient because they HAVE to get to work.

I have a feeling I'll be coming back to this thread, lol!

This reminds me of the time a lady brought her kid into the ER for something ridiculous then was complaining about getting discharge papers because she had to get said kid to a pediatrician's appointment. I really had to keep my tongue in check so that I didn't say something ultra snarky to her. 🙄

Davey Do

Has 41 years experience.

A patient allegedly popped a hydrocodone in their mouth with the same hand that had a bandaged self-inflicted wound. I requested to examine the wound. When they turned their hand over, there sat the hydrocodone.

"You'll need to take that first", I said.

Penelope_Pitstop, BSN, RN

Has 13 years experience.

A patient allegedly popped a hydrocodone in their mouth with the same hand that had a bandaged self-inflicted wound. I requested to examine the wound. When they turned their hand over, there sat the hydrocodone.

"You'll need to take that first", I said.

MedSurg floor - a lady had someone bring in her home Percocet and she crushed it up and injected it into her PICC with a syringe she dug out of the trash. Would have worked, I guess, but she wasn't too good at crushing, and she also fell asleep mid-injection.

JasBSN

Specializes in Critical care, ER, stepdown, PACU, LTC. Has 15 years experience.

When I worked ER I had an 18-19 year old male patient come in. Don't remember why he was there, but for some reason we needed urine for a drug screen. Kid said he didn't have to go, so we gave him ice water to drink. A few minutes later he hands us his "sample" of very clear urine complete with ice cubes. It was a slow night, so about 30 minutes later we told him "looks like you tested positive for coke, you're being discharged into police custody!" He of course denied using drugs (doesn't everybody?), asked if he could take the test again. We of course told him yes, but this time, you might want to actually pee in the cup and not just dump ice water in. Do you really think we're that stupid??

KatieMI, BSN, MSN, RN

Specializes in ICU, LTACH, Internal Medicine. Has 7 years experience.

Great idea for the post!

Family member called and said that the PCA pump was "leaking and beeping". The pump was indeed beeping "empty" but under it there was a puddle of fluid of the volume obviously much larger that the 30 cc it supposed to be, complete with some ice cubes. Called police found the content of the pump drained in the plastic bag in the family member's pocket. Gosh, if you were smart enough to disconnect, open and reprogram the pump so you could drain it in minutes, then why did you think about such crude and unbelievable substitution?

Regarding unusual requests, I once had daughter of a patient asking nursing staff to "keep always filled and beautifully arranged" candy bowl in the patient's room, complete with buying candy. She argued that nurses were getting enough money to afford that. The same patient complained that she was waiting "for hours" to have her huge set of colored pencils sharpened so that she could enjoy her coloring books.

canoehead, BSN, RN

Specializes in ER. Has 30 years experience.

Sharpen my colored pencils! and buy me candy!

Fluff my pillow! Bend my straw!

I can't even. I'll be back after I calm down. The sad thing is that if they were nice we'd have no problem doing those little extras. But they think they are entitled to have a slave, and it's just not happening. I would ignore those pencils for days, just because it's one small thing I can say No to.

~Mi Vida Loca~RN, ASN, RN

Specializes in Emergency Dept. Trauma. Pediatrics. Has 6 years experience.

So I thought of one I was gonna post in my "Not today Satan, not today thread" but that can loosely (very loosely) fit in here. I promise this story is 100% true.

Patient comes into the ER via family. Very very sickly man, you can tell by looking at him that he is on his last few months maybe year. So getting him worked up and we move him to the trauma bays so we have more room, docs are suspecting that his aortic aneurysm might be starting to dissect and want a CT, but he is very unstable and so we are trying to stabilize him. Well he codes, his family is waiting in the family room. We code him for like a good 30 mins before the doctor calls time of death. Doctor and nurse leave to go tell the family. Me and a tech go to cover the body and clean up so the family can come in and say their goodbyes. X-Ray tech and a couple interns are still in the bays. As we are cleaning up I sh^t you not, this man sits up and looks around and says "what's going on". We all looked at each other like what in the world. I finally say "Hey Mr. %*$ what's going on? Let me get you a warm blanket. The Tech goes to get the doctor who has already told the family.

Comes back and I have him back on the monitor and all that and the doc comes in and looks him over and asks him some questions and says "Well let's get him to CT". The patient ended up passing away (again) the next day. The rest of his family had arrived from out of town later that night and all got to see him.

He pulled one over on us alright. Never had anything even close to that happening prior or since and had there not been MULTIPLE other people there I might have thought it was all in my head.

caffeinatednurse, BSN, RN

Specializes in Med-surg, telemetry, oncology, rehab, LTC, ALF. Has 4 years experience.

My short term rehab pts are the worse for this. Not a day goes by where I don't have to explain to a pt that no, I'm actually not here to spoon feed you pain pills. You actually do need to get up and work with therapy. Word spread quickly by phone of this horrible nurse ratchet. And then the family shows up and demands "special treatment" (i.e. more pain pills, better food, a nicer facility, etc.). My favorite moment is when my pt's families realize that their loved one has been pulling their leg the entire time and they come to apologize to me and the other staff for their behavior.

Ruby Vee, BSN

Specializes in CCU, SICU, CVSICU, Precepting & Teaching. Has 40 years experience.

I had just come back to work after a lengthy medical leave for cancer discovered during the pre-op work-up for bilateral knee replacements. Naturally, cancer trumps knee replacements, so I came back to work in every bit as much pain and with no more mobility than when I left. (I thought I was doing a good job of hiding it, but subsequent remarks by my colleagues tell me that was a fantasy on my part.) On my second day back, a colleague told me she needed help ambulating a patient. Part of my job; I'll do it. But she seemed a bit giddy to me.

So Ana and I go into the patient's room with the portable monitor, oxygen tank, walker, etc. and she tells the patient "Come on Mr. Imawhiner, it's time to walk around the unit." Patient insists he doesn't need to walk, doesn't want to walk and Ana gives him the standard line about the importance of mobility post-op, and that his surgeon hadn't identified a reason that this would be an exception.

The patient whines, "I can't walk. I need a knee replacement."

Ana steps back to let me handle things, and right on cue, I blurted out "Well I need TWO knee replacements and if I can HELP you walk around the unit, you can do the walking."

He got out of bed and walked around the unit.

Sharpen my colored pencils! and buy me candy!

Fluff my pillow! Bend my straw!

I can't even. I'll be back after I calm down. The sad thing is that if they were nice we'd have no problem doing those little extras. But they think they are entitled to have a slave, and it's just not happening. I would ignore those pencils for days, just because it's one small thing I can say No to.

I would have a problem being asked to buy and stock a patient's candy dish on my own dime. I don't care how nicely they asked.