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Work from home insight?

Posted

Has 2 years experience.

Question for any nurses out there that may have worked from home or are working from home? I am expecting my first child and my husband and I work the same shift (M-F 8-5). Which would mean we would need childcare which as you know can be very expensive.

Any insights on working from home? Has anyone done it with a baby? How much is the pay? Just would like some insight to this. I do not know much about it.

Thanks!

TheCommuter, BSN, RN

Specializes in Case mgmt., rehab, (CRRN), LTC & psych. Has 15 years experience.

I work from home as an RN case manager from an insurance company.

Although I do not have children, my coworkers who do have kids must still utilize childcare at least 16 to 20 hours weekly. It would be unprofessional for you to be on the phone with clients and customers while kids are crying in the background.

I earn in the mid-$70k range yearly.

Ginger's Mom, MSN, RN

Has 41 years experience.

I worked evenings and weekends when my kids were small. It worked the best for me. Most work from home make sure you have day care for your child.

Asystole RN, BSN, RN

Specializes in Vascular Access, Infusion Therapy.

My wife works from home but you cannot have your kids home until they are older and can play/fend for themselves. We had to do 100% childcare/preschool until my daughter was about 4. Now that she can play by herself my wife can work with her home but it is sometimes a challenge to keep her in another room and quiet.

When my oldest was born my wife and I worked double 16's on the weekend together which meant that the in-laws only had to watch him from Friday night to Sunday night.

If you can adjust your schedule I would recommend (x3) 12 hour shifts, a lot easier to do 3 days of daycare than 5...if you can work over the weekend then you only need 1 day.

My personal experience though was that my kids developed exceedingly faster and their behavior improved when they went to daycare/preschool. The socialization and structure really helped them. A reputable daycare/preschool is important though and nice things cost nice money.

Yeah, people who don't have babies think that it's easy to have one and working at home will be a piece of cake.

I had an embroidered sampler all done while I was pregnant with my first, except for the baby's name. I also used to read three or four books a week. That baby was six months old before I had the seven letters in her name on that sampler, and it took me the better part of a year to finish the book I had on my bedside table when I went into labor.

I have worked from home as a caase manager and in other capacities now for any years. It's not feasible without good daycare until they go to school, and even then you have to be done c work from the minute they get home until after bedtime. Some jobs will be good with that, e.g., some field case management jobs. Some won't, e.g., most telephonic case mgmt jobs.

I totally agree on the benefits of excellent day care. In my case, one year I spent one half of my pre-tax income in daycare for two kids. It was worth every dang dime, but I didn't really have a job at home that I could do when they were at home until they were old enough to understand, "If the door to the office is closed, do not open it unless there is lots of blood or actual flame."

Now I have my own company. And my kids have kids of their own. And great daycare.

BadwomanM

Specializes in Case manager, UR. Has 27 years experience.

I agree with all of the above. I work from home, am fortunate in having adult children so no day care to worry about. I have quotas I must meet, and am on the phone with doctors and online call in meetings, so having children at home and trying to work wouldn't be feasible. It's a job like any other, except that I do it primarily from my house. When my DIL was expecting, she was talking about finding something from home and I told her...with few exceptions, I think you'll find that any job you get is still going to require that you find daycare or a sitter. Just because it's done from home doesn't mean the requirements are less stringent..in many cases, they're probably more so.

RNperdiem, RN

Has 14 years experience.

If childcare costs are the main issue, you might consider a per diem schedule where you work weekends. The per diem rate might be high enough that less than a full time schedule might cover your bills while avoiding the cost of childcare.

Even with using your husband for childcare on weekends, you need to find some sort of backup childcare and emergency backup childcare. I have had to use them before.

I worked from home for a bit when I had a 2 yr old. Nothing makes a young child demand full attention more than a parent trying to concentrate on something else.

To meet productivity expectations, which are higher than ever, you will need childcare.

quazar

Has 20 years experience.

I worked from home for a bit when I had a 2 yr old. Nothing makes a young child demand full attention more than a parent trying to concentrate on something else.

Truer words were never spoken. My children ignore me until I put the phone to my ear (or try to go to the bathroom or take a shower). Then I am the most interesting person in the world and/or all hades breaks loose. Every single time.

Been there,done that, ASN, RN

Has 33 years experience.

See the many work from home threads here on AN.

It is not realistic to expect you can perform your job, while taking care of your baby. They are both full time jobs.

I work from home, I have signed a contract to keep my telecommuting position. Rule #1 is.. I will NOT perform childcare duties. ..when I am on their dime.

I do have a dog.. she better not bark while I am on the phone.

Been there,done that, ASN, RN

Has 33 years experience.

I work from home as an RN case manager from an insurance company.

Although I do not have children, my coworkers who do have kids must still utilize childcare at least 16 to 20 hours weekly. It would be unprofessional for you to be on the phone with clients and customers while kids are crying in the background.

I earn in the mid-$70k range yearly.

Crying kids in the back ground.. would get me canned in a heartbeat.

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