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work 1 day week, 8 hours, is it possible?

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How many Nursing hours is minimu, want to work 1 day a week.?

I am wondering how many hours, minimum, I can work as a nurse. Ideally, I would want to work a minimum of 1 day a week, for 8 hour shift.

my reasons for doing this is because I have other aspirations and although I love helping people, I just want to use nursing to fall back on...I want to spend most of my time studying music and marketing and perfecting my craft, so that I can be happier doing what I WANT to do, to make profit, than doing what I HAVE to do

so how many hours is the minimum for nursing? can I work one day a week for 8 hours?

Edited by dianah
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You can if you can find someone to hire you under those circumstances. Knew someone who worked one or two days a month to keep up their nursing skills. Easiest to do in an extended care home health situation, although you could probably negotiate one shift a week in a LTC facility under the right circumstances.

LoveMyBugs, BSN, CNA, RN

Specializes in Pediatrics.

You could work PRN/per deim/registry, whatever you want to call it. I worked registry while going to nursing school as a CNA, and the requirment was a min of 4 shifts a period (4weeks) 2 shifts on the weekend, 2 on the weekday, you pick the days. So you could work 1 shift a week if you wanted.

Where I work, PRN is only required to work 2 weekend shifts per month, and they don't have to be on the same weekend. So yes, it's possible.

Reno1978, BSN, RN

Specializes in SRNA. Has 6 years experience.

Realistically speaking, it'd be sort of ridiculous to go through the cost and stress of nursing school if you want to work one 8 hour shift per week. Additionally, most employers will not hire a new nurse on those terms. Once you have some experience, you can work per diem/PRN somewhere that has 8 hour shifts (which are not the norm in hospital settings).

RNperdiem, RN

Has 14 years experience.

If you are willing to forego the benefits of employer health insurance and retirement plans and work per diem, and find somewhere that staffs 8 hour shifts and find a place that has 8 hours as a minimum per pay period, then maybe.

You will also need to invest in some full time in nursing out of school to gain the skill needed to compentently care for patients.

Most places will let you go per diem after one year of full time, but personally I would recommend at least two or three years.

SlightlyMental_RN

Specializes in chemical dependency detox/psych.

I work about 2 shifts a week M-F, 8 hours apiece, PRN. However, this was after I put in my time working full-time swing shifts. I schedule when I want to work...if I want to work a bunch one week, I can. Or, if I want to take a couple weeks off, I can do that, too. Just know that you generally will not have this type of scheduling freedom until you've put in 1+ years of working full-time. Additionally, you have to be in a place financially where the lack of benefits will not affect you. Believe me, I know that I'm a lucky, lucky woman.

Meriwhen, ASN, BSN, RN

Specializes in Psych ICU, addictions.

If you are already a nurse, find a place that will hire you per-diem/PRN and whose minimum requirement is one shift a week. As others have said, a lot of places won't let you do that until you have a year or two of full-time experience under your belt...but it is possible.

If you are not yet a nurse, seriously consider NOT becomming one. I say this with kindness because you will be putting a lot of time, stress, effort and money into nursing school just to work one day a week...and these resources can be better spent on developing your music career. Also, as already mentioned, very few places will let you work one day a week as a new grad, for your sake as much as theirs--there's no way you really can build new skills as a new grad on one shift a week. So you'd have to work full-time after school for a while anyway.

Best of luck whatever you decide!

roser13, ASN, RN

Specializes in Med/Surg, Ortho, ASC. Has 17 years experience.

I will echo what others have said....if you are not a nurse already (and I'm guessing from your post that you're not), I doubt that you would enjoy pursuing this route.

Nursing school is hard. No matter how smart you are or how much you "love helping people," nursing school will not be easy. Your music career will definitely fall by the wayside during the 2-4 years required to graduate.

And of course after graduation, you will have to work full-time for some period in order to even be considered for the vast majority of prn or part-time positions.

BluegrassRN

Has 14 years experience.

You could to one 12 hour shift a week on our medical/surgical floor...after you've gotten some experience. Basically, if you worked full time for a full year after your 3 month orientation (if you were hired as a new grad), you would probably be allowed to go prn and work so few hours.

We just hired a new grad and she is only going to work one day a week (her choice.) She is working on her masters in education and that is her goal. Not the cash. We have always hired staff for one shift a week if we have.

OttawaRPN

Specializes in acute care med/surg, LTC, orthopedics. Has 5 years experience.

I am wondering how many hours, minimum, I can work as a nurse. Ideally, I would want to work a minimum of 1 day a week, for 8 hour shift.

my reasons for doing this is because I have other aspirations and although I love helping people, I just want to use nursing to fall back on...I want to spend most of my time studying music and marketing and perfecting my craft, so that I can be happier doing what I WANT to do, to make profit, than doing what I HAVE to do so how many hours is the minimum for nursing? can I work one day a week for 8 hours?

It does sound like nursing is not for you. Regardless of how many physical hours you work, this profession devours your heart and soul then spits it back out at you for another go around. Nurses need to, ultimately, integrate their identities as nurses into their total life, and balance this harmoniously with all other aspects of their identities - wife, husband, parent, etc. I just don't read that level of commitment in your post. Sorry.

If you're looking to "help" people, consider a less all-consuming career like recreation/activation or maybe restorative care.

himilayaneyes

Specializes in Critical Care/Coronary Care Unit,.

If you're already a nurse, I suggest you work per-diem somewhere or even better for a staffing agency. Most staffing agencies require you to work once every 90 days while a lot of per-diem placed require 3-4x/month. However, they also require at least one year of experience. If you're not a nurse yet and just want to use nursing to "fall back on" as you say...I honestly suggest you don't become a nurse. It's really easy to get burned out in this profession, particularly for those who didn't really want to be nurses and just wanted financial stability. My advice is to follow your dream...and if your dream isn't nursing...don't do yourself (or patients) a disservice b/c you'll only regret it in the end. Good luck.

Sparrowhawk

Specializes in LTC.

Don't waste your time...besides how would you live on just 8 hours a week?

HouTx, BSN, MSN, EdD

Specializes in Critical Care, Education. Has 35 years experience.

Many employers are very reluctant to employ a nurse who will not work more than one day a week because it is a poor return on their investment. No matter how few hours you work, they still have to provide you with the same amount of 'mandatory training' as the full-time staff in order to meet regulatory requirements. It is usually easier to get an existing staff person to pick up that extra shift for OT pay.

MERRYWIDOW46

Specializes in ER, OR, PACU, TELE, CATH LAB, OPEN HEART. Has 33 years experience.

Also, many BON require a certain number of clinical hours to maintain your license. My state requires 5000 hours in 5 years. 1000 hours a year works out to about 20 hours a week every week for 52 weeks a year. Good luck, but I'd advise as others have to find another source of income to persue your love of music.

dance4life

Specializes in They know this too!.

I have seen jobs like this posted.

I have two friends that have other careers that are also nurses. They work a couple of shifts a month to keep their skills per say. It has worked out well in their favor, because let me tell you if you knew my story and in this economy least they had "something else to fall back on" besides nursing. Wish I would of thought of that I tell ya. Recession proof my behind.

GooeyRN, ASN, RN

Specializes in Psych, Med/Surg, LTC. Has 12 years experience.

You can do just that if you want. You will have to get some experience first, though. You may have to accept a part-time job (24 hours a week) for a year or so before anyone would consider you for only one day a week. I have worked one place one shift a week, one place two 4 hour shifts, and right now I do just every other weekend as per-diem. It works great for me since I have 2 very young children and another coming soon. It is enough to stay in the field, but not feel trapped by work and have to deal with daycare and all of that.