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Will most hospitals hire a person with a bachelors dgree before a person with an ADN.

Posted

Thanx!

I don't think that really matters at all.

eriksoln, BSN, RN

Specializes in M/S, Travel Nursing, Pulmonary. Has 15 years experience.

Not that I know of. Even though the only reason ADN degrees still exist is because of the shortage and the thought process is that all nurses should eventually have their BSN, ADN nurses are not frowned upon.

I think experience, attitude, flexibility and references have more to do with who they choose than the degree.

marilynmom, LPN, NP

Specializes in Adolescent Psych, PICU.

Most? No.

Some? Yes

Some of the magnet seeking hospitals will hire BSN over ADN just so they can get their stats up to par. I know my old hospital was doing that.

For my new job interview the nurse manager asked if I had my bachelors (which I do) but I knew the reason she was asking was because of their magnet seeking status.

SummerGarden, ADN, BSN, MSN, RN

Specializes in ED, ICU, MS/MT, PCU, CM, House Sup, Frontline mgr. Has 13 years experience.

life is not that cut and dry.... i would say very few will hire a ba, bs, bsn over an adn. even those seeking magnet status can do so cost effectively by hiring adns and offering small incentives (and i do mean small) to return to school for a bsn, like mine. although i was hired and have multiple other degrees my classmates were hired with the same pay and benefits with only adns. those who had better benefits are not the bsns rather those who already worked for the hospital prior to graduating with his/her nursing degree. therefore, if you are looking to be marketable, be sure to get a job as a tech and/or a nurse extern before graduating so you have a better shot of being hired on as a new grad.

as one poster put it... the decision to do one over the other can boil down to life circumstances and finances. if you have the money and the time to get a bsn right away, then go for it! if you are strapped for cash, must care for self and others, and do not want to be in debt close to or over $100,000 of student loans, then try the adn then rn-bsn route. i paid cash for my adn and am having my employers pay for my bsn while i work as a new grad. i am nursing-school-student-loan debt free and owe no one any amount of time of service. :up:

Dragonnurse1, ASN, RN

Specializes in ER - trauma/cardiac/burns. IV start spec. Has 9 years experience.

ADN vs BSN.. that is a very hotly debated route. In my area the hospitals still hire ADNs for all nursing care and the number one reason for hiring BSNs is for management. This area still goes by the old addage "those who can - do, those how can't - teach". Before I had to quit nursing the only state that required BSNs was Montana and the reason for that was :confused:- I don't know. The few BSNs hired into the ER washed out and went to floors.

BroadwayRN, ASN, RN

Specializes in ER. Has 4 years experience.

Where I work they don't care if you have an ADN or BSN as long as you are healthy, honest and can work. BSN's can move into management but most don't. Most stay with bedside nursing. Those who work in management come in applying for management positions not bedside positions.

Tweety, BSN, RN

Specializes in Med-Surg, Trauma, Ortho, Neuro, Cardiac. Has 28 years experience.

Are you talking new grad positions? If you're not work experience sometimes trumps degree.

If you are talking new grad, it might depend on supply and demand. If there are only a few new grad positions and many applicants the recruiter might hire BSNs before ADNs, especially in a Magnet facility.

Also, sometimes recruiters have prejudices themselves. Some recruiters buy into the myth that ADNs get more clinical time and make better bedside nurses than the BSNs and hire the ADNs over the BSNs. And visa versa.

As someone above said, it's not that cut and dry.

In the facility I work, bedside entry level positions seem to be open to both BSNs and ADNs equally.

Oz2

Specializes in rehab, long-term care, ortho. Has 2 years experience.

In a hospital by me they will no longer even hire ADNs. You must have your BSN.

So BSN's have a greater chance of working in a magnet hospital? How do you find out before you apply for them if they are magnet hospitals and if they hire ADN's

Super Nurse JoshuA

Specializes in Med/Surg,.

Hospitals in my area of Western Arkansas just want a pulse and a license. Sometimes it's questionable on the pulse :omy:

eriksoln, BSN, RN

Specializes in M/S, Travel Nursing, Pulmonary. Has 15 years experience.

Hospitals in my area of Western Arkansas just want a pulse and a license. Sometimes it's questionable on the pulse :omy:

OMG funny.

Reminds me of a clinical experience I had. An RN, away from the instructor, asked us how far along we were. We told her first semester. She asked us to describe what aspects of an assessment we understood. When we got to the neuro check, which included AOx3, she said "Good, so you know what that means then."

We looked at her in puzzlement. Then she finished "I'm not sure your instructor is AOx3 if you know what I mean. Did I hear her right when I overheard her tell that student ....................." I forget what it was she heard but it was another of many glaring examples of how our instructor was not qualified.

So, if you have a pulse and arent AOx3, its still enough.

Not_A_Hat_Person, RN

Specializes in Geriatrics, Home Health. Has 10 years experience.

Here in Boston, definitely. Some hospitals will consider a nurse with a BA or non-nursing BS and an ADN the equivalent of a BSN, but most won't. Magnet hospitals won't consider ADNs.

shodobe

Specializes in O.R., ED, M/S.

Depending on the position, experience always trumps a degree. ALWAYS. I'll put up my 30+ years over any BSN grad anytime. Most, if not all competent hospitals will always go with the experienced nurse. Look at what is happening across the country with new grads. They are finding it difficult to find work because they have no work experience, whereas a nurse with a number of years will usually get a job. Why? It is just logical that hospitals not waste a lot of time training new nurses. Experienced nurses can usually be up and running in a short time, new grads take time and money.

Actually, believe it or not, I overheard the management say that they prefer ADNs for bedside nurses compared to BSNs. Their reasoning behind this is that the ADNs have more extensive bedside care experience, as opposed to the BSN and the heavy theory they study instead. From personal experience, I find that the students I work with from ADN programs are better and harder workers (this is based on MY experience so far. I'm not calling anyone lazy). They are better at their assessment skills, they have more nursing 'common sense', they are more eager to learn, and they are very disciplined.

eriksoln, BSN, RN

Specializes in M/S, Travel Nursing, Pulmonary. Has 15 years experience.

Actually, believe it or not, I overheard the management say that they prefer ADNs for bedside nurses compared to BSNs. Their reasoning behind this is that the ADNs have more extensive bedside care experience, as opposed to the BSN and the heavy theory they study instead. From personal experience, I find that the students I work with from ADN programs are better and harder workers (this is based on MY experience so far. I'm not calling anyone lazy). They are better at their assessment skills, they have more nursing 'common sense', they are more eager to learn, and they are very disciplined.

I made this point in another topic, "ADV vs. BSN". lol I see it, I know others do too. Its too linear to be a coincidence.

Dragonnurse1, ASN, RN

Specializes in ER - trauma/cardiac/burns. IV start spec. Has 9 years experience.

Would someone explain what the heck a "Magnet" hospital is? Do they have more intelligent workers and patients? All I have ever heard of is Level 1, 11, 111 Trauma Hospital or Teaching hospitals. What horsehocky are people shoveling now?

Super Nurse JoshuA

Specializes in Med/Surg,.

Actually, believe it or not, I overheard the management say that they prefer ADNs for bedside nurses compared to BSNs. Their reasoning behind this is that the ADNs have more extensive bedside care experience, as opposed to the BSN and the heavy theory they study instead. From personal experience, I find that the students I work with from ADN programs are better and harder workers (this is based on MY experience so far. I'm not calling anyone lazy). They are better at their assessment skills, they have more nursing 'common sense', they are more eager to learn, and they are very disciplined.

I think this is completely dependent on the area of the country. Where I am at the first traditional BSN program graduates ,I believe, next May (2010). Therefore, the overwhelming majority of the few prepared BSN nurses in this area are ADN/Diploma's first. As the diploma nurses have quietly disappeared (the last class graduated in the early 70's) it's the LPNs who claim to have the more "clinical" abilities of the nurses arguing that the RN's with their ADN's are all "book learning, explanation, and theory".

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