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Why do you think it is beneficial to have a second nurse available during a catheterization?

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I am doing a project and would really appreciate if some RNs would answer these questions (or even one of the questions) for me! Please and thank you! 
 

1.) Why do you think it would be beneficial to have a second nurse available during the urinary catheterization process? 

2.) How do you meet the  patient safety goal of CAUTI prevention in your clinical practice? 

3.) What are some  barriers you have noticed which prevent this NPSG from being met in your clinical setting? 

4.)  Identify other measures which are in place to promote the meeting of this goal in the clinical setting? 

amoLucia

Specializes in LTC.

what is NPSG?

39 minutes ago, amoLucia said:

what is NPSG?

Nursing Patient Safety Goals 

Been there,done that, ASN, RN

Has 33 years experience.

Why is this even a project? It's common sense that to even ATTEMPT to maintain sterility.. it would require two people. Does not have to be another R.N. 

Just please.. somebody hold the flashlight for me... so it's not a total stab in the dark.

27 minutes ago, Been there,done that said:

Why is this even a project? It's common sense that to even ATTEMPT to maintain sterility.. it would require two people. Does not have to be another R.N. 

Just please.. somebody hold the flashlight for me... so it's not a total stab in the dark.

I have to ask RN's it's for my project. I realize it's common sense, but that is the question we have to ask, if you don't want to answer don't bother commenting, I need serious replies. 

 

And it might sound like a joke to you, but in my state at one of the top hospital's in the country this is what they do and because of that they have a low incidence of CAUTI. 

Edited by Rainha_portuguesa

amoLucia

Specializes in LTC.

Most times, its just helpful to have someone there just to better aim the flashlight, or hold a leg.

In many small NHs, there's usually only 1 nurse to a floor. I did many a cath by myself, unassisted. (NOCs always has to catch the lab specimens for morning pickup.) To the best of my ability, I always tried my best technique.

amoLucia

Specializes in LTC.

OP - you need to back down.

PP Been there, done that answered you JUST FINE. And she did you the courtesy of actually answering you question. You misinterpreted her comment, which does have a twinge of wry humor. I caught her intent, but I think you missed it BIG TIME!

I think hostility is the wrong approach to take if you want answers to your questions rather than scolding experienced nurses who might otherwise have assisted you. Nobody here has treated your questions as a joke.

Been there,done that, ASN, RN

Has 33 years experience.

1 hour ago, Rainha_portuguesa said:

I have to ask RN's it's for my project. I realize it's common sense, but that is the question we have to ask, if you don't want to answer don't bother commenting, I need serious replies. 

 

And it might sound like a joke to you, but in my state at one of the top hospital's in the country this is what they do and because of that they have a low incidence of CAUTI. 

Far from a joke, I gave you excellent advice. You would be wise to respect your elders.

Nurse Beth, MSN

Specializes in Med Surg, Tele, ICU, Ortho. Has 30 years experience.

We're just now implementing 2 RNs for foley insertion. Lippincott procedures now includes 2 people to assist with insertion. In a small unit there may not be another RN readily available, and a non-licensed nursing assistant can help with positioning, but an RN can also keep an eye out to help maintain a sterile field.

meanmaryjean, DNP, RN

Specializes in NICU, ICU, PICU, Academia. Has 44 years experience.

OP- this is clearly a homework assignment. Your best course of action here is to find some RNs in real life and ask them- because you've kind of poisoned the well here.

1 hour ago, meanmaryjean said:

OP- this is clearly a homework assignment. Your best course of action here is to find some RNs in real life and ask them- because you've kind of poisoned the well here.

yeah what was I thinking. This website is full of older  and quite arrogant nurses. I asked a simple question and 2 people managed to answer it with a decent answer. More than happy this generation is retiring from the profession. We don't all have the experience and knowledge you have and the more you give people a nasty attitude the less we learn. The younger the nurse the sweeter and more willing to help. I'll go to Reddit and ask the question, good riddance.

And NO it is not a 'homework assignment' it is a project, that's why I said it was a project. 

Edited by Rainha_portuguesa

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