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Why aren't there better incentives for obtaining a BSN degree?

Nurses   (14,007 Views | 100 Replies)

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You are reading page 2 of Why aren't there better incentives for obtaining a BSN degree?. If you want to start from the beginning Go to First Page.

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A one dollar raise and keeping your job and future retirement is far better than being shoved out into the street when the time comes. That is why one shouldn't wait for the ultimatum. So much easier to do it in the beginning of a career than after 30 years on the job.

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250 Posts; 6,108 Profile Views

A one dollar raise and keeping your job and future retirement is far better than being shoved out into the street when the time comes. That is why one shouldn't wait for the ultimatum. So much easier to do it in the beginning of a career than after 30 years on the job.

This is very true

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NightAngelle has 16 years experience and specializes in Emergency Nursing, Critical Care Nursing.

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Besides, this if RNs all had BSNs it would unify us, and they would no longer be able to play the very successful, "Divide and "Conquer". Why else would they notwant to pay.

I get livid when I hear nurses state, that BSNs shouldn't get more money because "we all do the same job". Teachers who graduate with Bachelors Degrees, and go on to earn Masters Degrees, get paid more money than the teachers who only have Bachelors Degree,even though they ALL DO THE SAME JOB!

If you see what I mean. Nurses argue the point constantly, parroting adminisitrators, who for their own selfish reasons (nothing to do with nurses, patients, etc), do not want nurses to increase their education. Can anyone but me see outside the box? How all of the arguements are pointless, especially since the subject was/has never even been brought up by other health care professionals.

That, in a nutshell, is why nurses who earn BSN, are not paid more. And nurses buy into this drivel , hook, line, and sinker!

AMEN!! We as a professional body are failing to see the BIGGER picture. I said on a previous thread that above all, in order to be taken more seriously as a profession as a whole, we should WANT to increase the educational requirements in order to be a professional nurse. Most other professions require a Masters' degree at minimum...and they have no problem getting paid what they are worth. It is so not about what one can do better than the other...or what the difference in pay between RNs and BSNs are...it is about how we are viewed and respected as a profession as a whole! I used to harbor the same "why bother" attitude, but thankfully I attended an RN-BSN program that helped me to see the BIGGER picture. Well stated, lindarn, and you are not the only person who feels this way!! :yeah:

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SummitRN has 8 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in ICU + Infection Prevention.

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There is little direct MONETARY incentive because there is not market pressure to instill such pay differentials.

There are plenty of career incentives though...

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blssdrn12 has 25 years experience and specializes in Home Care, Wound Care, LTC, Mom-baby.

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lindarn,

Thank you-if I could kudos you again I would!:yeah::yeah:

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621 Posts; 5,505 Profile Views

a bsn opens more jobs and advancement to you and maybe a buck or two more pay. other than that, the US health care system sees no need to give incentives for 2 more years of general college education.

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PMFB-RN has 16 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in burn ICU, SICU, ER, Traum Rapid Response.

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Most other professions require a Masters' degree at minimum...and they have no problem getting paid what they are worth.

*** So should we. The entry for RN practice should be the direct entry masters. To go to nursing school a student should first have to obtain a relivent undergrad degree (imagine nurse managers who actually had training in managment!) Then enter into a nursing school that grants the entry level masters.

This would drasticaly reduce the number of people who would attend nursing school thus limiting entry into our field. This would have to increase RN wages, at least until we started to import RN from overseas in large number, wich we would after all the big hospital companies lobbied congress about the supposed shortage of nurses.

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290 Posts; 2,869 Profile Views

*** So should we. The entry for RN practice should be the direct entry masters. To go to nursing school a student should first have to obtain a relivent undergrad degree (imagine nurse managers who actually had training in managment!) Then enter into a nursing school that grants the entry level masters.

This would drasticaly reduce the number of people who would attend nursing school thus limiting entry into our field. This would have to increase RN wages, at least until we started to import RN from overseas in large number, wich we would after all the big hospital companies lobbied congress about the supposed shortage of nurses.

I could not agree with this. Just because someone has a MSN does not make them a better nurse. A professor (when I was getting my RN-BSN) said to me that she learned all her basic nursing in her first LPN/RN program. I was a diploma grad first, then did a RN-BSN, then MSN. Hospitals in the NE are wanting to hire more BSNs so they can get (they pay for it) Magnet status, which means more patients will want to spend their money there. It has little to do with better patient outcomes or less people dying. It's all about MONEY. And it is a way to keep nursing more exclusive, so lower economic, disadvantaged people cannot afford a BSN or for sure, a MSN. Just another way to limit people. Isn't it crystal clear????:mad:

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SummitRN has 8 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in ICU + Infection Prevention.

2 Articles; 1,536 Posts; 30,688 Profile Views

MSN entry minimum would result in increased wages to the point where costs would become a burden to the system. The result would be a drastic increases in work visas for foreign nurses in combination with decreased number of nurses used and increased reliance on technicians and unlicensed personnel.

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290 Posts; 2,869 Profile Views

MSN entry minimum would result in increased wages to the point where costs would become a burden to the system. The result would be a drastic increases in work visas for foreign nurses in combination with decreased number of nurses used and increased reliance on technicians and unlicensed personnel.

Excellent! You are exactly correct! And it's always about the MONEY!! :mad:

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Professionally, I transitioned from LPN to RN-BSN to MHA/Ed and continue to perform bedside duties and take commands from managers and supervisors that do not have half the education that I have. WHAT is WRONG with that picture. As I strive to branch off into other avenues because of my education level I meet many stop signs in the road and ponder why did I spend time and (loan) money to further my education in this profession. As a WHOLE we need ALL need to look at the BIGGER picture of what is taking place here with this profession. IF a nurse has invested the time to further there educational practice to obtain a higher degree then there is a difference. Such as with EVERY OTHER PROFESSION in the work force that is complimented for there achievement in continuing education. It is really disturbing the misleading approaches facilities take to undermine nurses if you allow them. Yes, they want you to further your education but give pennies on the dollar to do so or nothing at all. People are plagued with REAL life issues that do not always allow then to jump right back into a 2 or 4 year program to continue acquiring loans to have a higher degree to essentially do the same job.

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SNB1014 has 4 years experience as a ADN, RN.

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well, im an ADN RN student in texas with a previous BS in bio-behavioral health and my incentive is to actually be attractive to potential employers. at our state nursing conference over spring break, we were told that adn's are in bad shape because hospitals are oversaturated with new grad rn's and therefore have the option to hire BSNs only. however, the recent UTMB BSN class of 2010 has only 10 rn employed out of their graduating 70, i am told.

and fyi, this is in houston.

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