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Where should a new grad BSN move?

Posted

Hi all,

I have applied to numerous residencies all over the country, and only have 1 interview scheduled. I will move anywhere for work. I am looking for an acute care hospital setting. Any suggestions?

Thanks.

Mars!

:-) Just kidding but that's how they make us new grads feel!

The problem (at least in my area) is that all of the new grad residency programs are giving the slots away to people who work at that hospital as a CNA before they graduate. No one else seems to have a chance.

That said, use your connections. When people said that to me, I thought wow, I'm a recent student, I have none! But think of any clinical rotations you did really well at. Walk in or call and speak to your preceptor(s). Tell them you really really learned a lot on that unit and you would love to work there. Ask them if they would put in a good word for you next time a position opens. That got me a job and of my classmates who have jobs and were not formerly CNAs, it worked for them as well. Nursing school told us to do the online application stuff that most facilities require, but (in Colorado anyway) it doesn't work. Applications are rejected before any human ever sees them. In person, preferably with a nurse who remembers how awesome you were in clinical seems to be the number one most successful way of getting a job.

Either that, or move to some rural town a zillion miles from everyone you know--ND and Montana for example. May as well be Mars!

The problem is I went to school in FL and can't stand to live there one more minute, so my connections are useless. Rural towns are fine as long as they're not in FL. :)

TheCommuter, BSN, RN

Specializes in Case mgmt., rehab, (CRRN), LTC & psych. Has 15 years experience.

In essence, the places where few people want to live are the same cities and towns where new grad hospital openings are abundant. Destinations such as Lawton, OK, Wichita, KS, Fargo, ND, Eagle Pass, TX, Lincoln, NE, and Cheyenne, WY are the most promising for new grads.

However, to be a serious candidate, you'd need licensure in the state where you plan to move. Job applications without the licensure in hand might not be taken seriously.

DatMurse

Specializes in Hematology/Oncology. Has 3 years experience.

I applied to 20+ different states. Bismarck and Fargo ND called me right away. I had interviews for medsurg in fargo and bismarck but I rejected it because I had med/onc in bismarck.

I want Onc exp....

Anything on the east coast? I think I could put up with Lincoln NE for a year. Those other places will be the death of me.

TheCommuter, BSN, RN

Specializes in Case mgmt., rehab, (CRRN), LTC & psych. Has 15 years experience.

Anything on the east coast? I think I could put up with Lincoln NE for a year. Those other places will be the death of me.

Most places on the East Coast are glutted with more new grads nurses than can be absorbed except perhaps some towns in rural Maine and Vermont. There's a frequent poster on these forums who could not find a job anywhere in Massachusetts and ended up relocating to Vermont for the first nursing position almost a year after graduation.

Lawton is not too bad. It's a military instillation (Fort Sill), so it is full of muscular men in uniform and all of the places of business that provide recreation to them. It's also just a short drive from Dallas, Texas, which is a more cosmopolitan and fun city.

edmia, BSN, RN

Specializes in Emergency, ICU. Has 10 years experience.

Lawton is not too bad. It's a military instillation (Fort Sill), so it is full of muscular men in uniform...

Now that's a good recommendation!

It might be because I'm nearing the 6th decade of life, but relocating sounds very appealing to me. I've always wanted to live in an austere place like Fargo or ride a horse in Montana... Sigh, go live it for me OP!

Now for some serious talk: OP, the east coast is toast. Forget about it. Look at some of the places Commuter suggested and get your nursing shoes filled with confidence. I would rather spend the next 2 years learning my nursing craft than spend months learning how to get your resume to the top of the list.

Good luck!

Lawton is not too bad. It's a military instillation (Fort Sill), so it is full of muscular men in uniform and all of the places of business that provide recreation to them.

Military men are not my type at all. :dead: Also, I don't think a New Yorker like me would do well in Texas. I looked at a hospital in rural Vermont, but housing seemed to be impossible (no affordable rentals). It's still something I'm open to if anyone has any names of Vermont or Maine hospitals I can look into.

I will apply to ND if nothing pans out in the next month. I'm going stir-crazy sitting in this house with nothing to do. I need a job! :eek:

Nurse Kyles, BSN, RN

Specializes in Cath Lab & Interventional Radiology. Has 7 years experience.

The upper Midwest has quite a few openings and hires new grads, especially with a BSN. Also you could try getting into a nursing home to get some experience. I finally got call backs from hospitals when I had some nursing experience in a nursing home on my resume.

AWanderingMinstral

Specializes in Ortho/Uro/Peds/Research/PH/Insur/Travel. Has 6 years experience.

1) IF you're TRULY interested in an adventure, try applying for openings with the Indian Health Service. They also have loan repayment:

http://www.ihs.gov/careeropps/loanrepayment/

2) I have been a seasonal/travel nurse for the past three years. I really enjoyed my time working at Glens Falls Hospital in Glens Falls, NY. It's on the edge of the Adirondacks and it's an AWESOME place to be both in the winter and the summer.

Good luck!

whatsmyusername_RN

Specializes in Medical/Oncology.

Hi OP,

Are you willing to travel? How about to ND? St. Alexius has a graduate nurse program all year long. I've been hired there recently and had a good experience with them. I'm from CT and had to drive over 1700 miles to get there but I didn't regretted it. I'm new there but you can use me as a referral if you'd like. Just PM me.

DatMurse

Specializes in Hematology/Oncology. Has 3 years experience.

Military men are not my type at all. :dead: Also, I don't think a New Yorker like me would do well in Texas. I looked at a hospital in rural Vermont, but housing seemed to be impossible (no affordable rentals). It's still something I'm open to if anyone has any names of Vermont or Maine hospitals I can look into.

I will apply to ND if nothing pans out in the next month. I'm going stir-crazy sitting in this house with nothing to do. I need a job! :eek:

might as well apply even if you arent sure. Its a good idea to set up your backup

Would you be interested in relocating to California (central valley region)?

llg, PhD, RN

Specializes in Nursing Professional Development. Has 44 years experience.

Anything on the east coast? I think I could put up with Lincoln NE for a year. Those other places will be the death of me.

That's part of the problem. Most good employers don't want to hire people on a temporary basis. The cost of orienting you are not worth what they will get in return. That's why only places that are desperate would even consider it.

That's why I suggest focusing on areas you can see yourself settling in permanently -- or at least for several years. For example, a place where you have relatives or friends, or where you might want to go to graduate school. That way, you can talk about why you want to move there in your application/interview and sound like you actually mean it.

We rarely look seriously who would consider moving here only for the job. We've been burned too many times by people who stay a year, then take that 1 year of experience and use it to get a job "back home," where they really want to live.

Look at Norton Healthcare in Louisville, KY. I interviewed for a job there but turned it down cause it wasn't the right fit...but they hire new nurses and Louisville is a really cool little city. I loved the hospital and the manager and the other nurses I met doing share time. (This coming from a person who has lived in NYC, Boston, Singapore, London, Austin...etc)

Best of luck to you!

I hear Albany and other upstate New York places are pretty good for new grads. And after you get a year experience you can try your luck in the city. I think people have better luck in Jersey too (compared to the city)

estrellaCR, BSN, RN

Specializes in OB, Pediatrics, Maternal/Child Health. Has 2 years experience.

ANy rural area in any state is a good bet. Most people esp new grads do not flock to rural areas so they hire new grads easily there. I also saw on this forum that North Dakota, South Dakota, and Montana are very new grad friendly.