Jump to content

When to wear gloves!?

Posted

Hi all,

I am a brand new nurse one month out on the job. I went in to a patient's room today to disconnect the IV antibiotic and flush the line, and I put on gloves. The nurse who orients me said she never wears gloves to flush an IV and asked me why I did. I was told that you always wear gloves whenever you are in any situation where you could come in contact with blood.

Am I being over cautious by wearing gloves for simple flushes? What do you all do when you are flushing lines? I couldn't find an official protocol in any of my books just for a simple flush.

THANKS!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!:redpinkhe

Blee O'Myacin, BSN, RN

Specializes in ED, ICU, Heme/Onc.

Wear gloves. You never know. Better to keep things cleaner for the patient also.

lpnflorida

Specializes in psych. rehab nursing, float pool. Has 30 years experience.

You were correct in wearing gloves. Not everyone does, however we each are responsible for how we practice. We all realize the right way of doing things and then there is the other way.

While you may be technically correct, I don't see how I'm at risk for coming into contact with blood by simply taking off an atx and flushing the line. I've never had it suddenly twist free of the body and start leaking blood.

So no, I don't wear gloves to flush a line. And while majority rule doesn't make something right, I've never seen any of the other nurses on my unit do this either.

lpnflorida

Specializes in psych. rehab nursing, float pool. Has 30 years experience.

Murphy's law, just about the time you believe each and every time you don't need gloves there will be that time you wish you had them on. lol

I don't, as there's no significant risk of touching blood, but you're not hurting anything by wearing gloves so go for it if it makes you feel more comfortable.

I do, more because it's another barrier between my germy hands and the clean line than because I'm worried about blood.

Meriwhen, ASN, BSN, MSN, RN

Specializes in Psych ICU, addictions.

I do because my hands usually have at least one cut/abrasion on them thanks to my hobbies--or my cats.

So while the risk of blood exposure during a flush is not great...given the state of my hands, wearing the gloves makes me feel better.

NeoNurseTX, RN

Specializes in NICU Level III.

I do, more because it's another barrier between my germy hands and the clean line than because I'm worried about blood.

This.

I wear gloves any time I TOUCH a patient, period.

In the NICU that's definitely appropriate.

NeoNurseTX, RN

Specializes in NICU Level III.

Yeah, if I worked with a less sensitive population, that wouldn't be the case.

NurseKatie08, MSN

Specializes in Geriatrics, Transplant, Education. Has 13 years experience.

I wear gloves when I flush lines...it couldn't hurt.

iluvivt, BSN, RN

Specializes in Infusion Nursing, Home Health Infusion. Has 32 years experience.

Yes I always wear gloves to perform this task. I can not tell you how many times I touch a patients arm to perform a task that should not expose me to much.....but then there was some open skin or blood from an IV stick or something on the underside of their arm and I was glad I had them on.

Ask your self this "Is there a potential for me to be exposed to any bodily fluid or open skin or mucus membranes". and there is your answer.

Yeah, if I worked with a less sensitive population, that wouldn't be the case.

Most of the population I see is incredibly debilitated. You don't get to stay overnight any more unless you're really fragile or waiting for nursing home placement.

Thanks everybody! The input has been very helpful.

RedWeasel, RN

Specializes in RN CRRN. Has 16 years experience.

I think it is a matter of not transferring something from our hands to the tubing, and then having been transferred into the tubing. It could happen. Why risk it? Gloves, always gloves.

Scrubby

Specializes in Operating Room Nursing. Has 6 years experience.

I have always carried a spare pair of gloves in my pocket because I will not get any patients blood or bodily on my hands, gross.

RedWeasel, RN

Specializes in RN CRRN. Has 16 years experience.

I have always carried a spare pair of gloves in my pocket because I will not get any patients blood or bodily on my hands, gross.

plus you know those confused patients...you can be cleaning them up and they stick their hand down their and scratch, then you have to take a toothbrush (one time use) to clean their nails...and who knows what they scratch when you are out of the room--but they touch their sheets and clothes and all....then they grab your bare arm when transferring and it creeps me out....sorry...I love em but don't want to take any part of them home with me....

Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.