Jump to content

When you have done all you can and it still seems not to be enough.

Posted

So I have a question. I am a new grad basically. Sometimes when I give report to another nurse I try to tell them all the info on the pt I can. Sometime I don't remember everything or it isn't written down on the sheet I keep. So sometime I get yelled at example for today " You should know how much or if the pt has voided" :nono: Granted I know I should know that but after a day like a had today that was at the bottom of my priorities. 3 of my 4 pts are having seizures and the doc are either sending them for tests or messing with their meds or both. Then the new resident is putting in the wrong orders. So that means I have to chase after her and ask " Do you really want this seizure pt to go on a tilt table" etc... I could go on but that is a short version not to mention 3 of them I would say had a high acuity. Anyway I get so intimidated and down on myself when I don't remember things like that especially if they were having a problem with urinating the other day. Am I ever going to have it together? I just feel so forgetful and so "new" at times.:o

CaLLaCoDe, BSN, RN

Specializes in Cardiology, Oncology, Medsurge.

Orientation is just plain tough. Sometimes I felt that it was a minnie nursing school all packed into 8 weeks! Actually I do believe mine lasted 12, but boy did I ever struggle. Know you are not alone. We all must start somewhere. Leave the grumpy ones to be grumpy and know you did try your best. Honestly, I think so. Don't give up, it is such a learning curve!

For humors sake please check out my post at the bottom of this thread:

https://allnurses.com/forums/f35/officially-off-orientation-tonight-yeaa-203190.html#post2035733

Eh, don't let it get under your skin. You'll find there are those who will nit-pick and bully and ***** and complain no matter what. Just do your best and let it go. Don't give them the power to ruin your day.

Tweety, BSN, RN

Specializes in Med-Surg, Trauma, Ortho, Neuro, Cardiac. Has 28 years experience.

It gets better with time. I do hate when another shift comes in and starts make judgements when you've had the day from hell.

Don't let people yell at you. That's so inappropriate. Having someone say "you should know........." is one thing, but yelling is another. Nip that in the bud immediately. That's unprofessional and uncalled for.

MIA-RN

Specializes in Med-Surg, ED.

Stuff like how much a patient voided etc does not have to be in report unless it was inadequate. I always say "voided sufficiently for shift, the exact total is on the I/O flowsheet." The only time I would give exacts is if there was a problem.

But if you want, and what I do when I am trying to remember to do stuff, is at the very bottom of your assignment sheet, write prompts for yourself. Like: I/o: Void total:___ Intake PO___ Intake IVF___, that sort of stuff, just to use as a visual to remind you to write it down.

When I was new I felt a little bit of 'hazing' from the more experienced nurse sometimes. They would ask questions that seemed to make no sense, or question things that were easy to find out (like the info on the flow sheets etc) I think that was their way of kind of breaking in a new nurse, and also maybe they were making sure that as a new nurse, I was on top of things and so that they wouldn't go in and see a patient who they thought was good but turned out to have a problem that wasn't given in report.

If you are truly getting yelled at, then you need to speak to whoever is in charge because new nurses do NOT deserve to be bullied. But if you are using yelled at as a slang, meaning spoken to, then I think its probably for the reasons I mentioned above.

Good luck. It really does get better.

deeDawntee, RN

Specializes in Travel Nursing, ICU, tele, etc. Has 12 years experience.

I am an "old" nurse and I don't always remember everything I am supposed to tell the next nurse. You do the best you can.

I firmly believe that "less is more" in most cases...just like in charting by exception, I believe in reporting by exception.

If I have had a bad shift, I tell them straight off, I didn't have a chance to read the chart etc.

If the next nurse has a question about something I missed, she can look it up!!

:uhoh3::uhoh3::uhoh3:

I am an "old" nurse and I don't always remember everything I am supposed to tell the next nurse. You do the best you can.

I firmly believe that "less is more" in most cases...just like in charting by exception, I believe in reporting by exception.

If I have had a bad shift, I tell them straight off, I didn't have a chance to read the chart etc.

If the next nurse has a question about something I missed, she can look it up!!

:uhoh3::uhoh3::uhoh3:

Exactly my feeling. Every nurse has their own "nit-point" as I call them. I know an ICU nurse who will interruprt every part of my report to ask me what the urine output was on every patient (I tell them this but not always the FIRST thing on the list). I usually do a focused report and then go out from there. If the patient has been having seizures and the meds are the issue then start there as Im sure you do then go. In CPR we do the A B C's. So is nursing.

Just tell the meannie nurses that you are doing your best and that is all you can do. You can't be sorry, just tell them you don't know the exat answer and we will look it up when I am finished.

Don't be discouraged! I sucked at report for a couple years and now I am really great at it(just don't ask that ICU nurse!):trout:

Elvish, BSN, DNP, RN, NP

Specializes in Community, OB, Nursery.

We all start out new. We all have to learn how to give report, and in a way that feels comfortable to us. It might help you to go in a specific order just like you do when assessing someone so you don't leave out anything important.

I also know that when you have nights/days like what you described, you are lucky to get 45 seconds to pee, much less know right off the top of your head what someone has peed. I wouldn't worry about it. I get report from nurses who've been there for 25 years who don't know everything. And you know what? I don't know everything when I give report. And I bet the nurse that got on your case doesn't always give complete report.

Let it slide off your back, honey. If that is the worst thing you ever do in your nursing career, you are doing REALLY well. Chin up! :)

Edited to add that I have called back to the floor many times on my way home from work to tell someone something I forgot earlier. It happens. You'll be alright.

TheCommuter, BSN, RN

Specializes in Case mgmt., rehab, (CRRN), LTC & psych. Has 15 years experience.

So sometime I get yelled at example for today " You should know how much or if the pt has voided" :nono:

Don't allow anyone to yell at you. If they do it once and get away with it, they'll surely do it again. If you become known as an "easy mark" for yelling and abuse, it will make your life at work many times harder. Unfortunately, many experienced nurses will test the waters with newer nurses during report, just to see how you'll react.

Here's my observation...I have noticed that bully nurses target certain individuals, while leaving other persons alone. Unfortunately, it's all about perception. If you are perceived as one who will not stand up for yourself, you'll be targeted for further harassment during report. If you're perceived as someone who will put up resistance and not allow anyone to yell at you, then people will quickly know to leave you alone.

Bullying is a crime of opportunity. Bullies tend to pick the most opportune targets: people who are less likely to respond in a defensive manner to the yelling. Also, if nothing is done, the bully will continue his/her rampage, because he/she knows that he/she can get away with it.

ShayRN

Specializes in Corrections, Cardiac, Hospice. Has 18 years experience.

Don't allow anyone to yell at you. If they do it once and get away with it, they'll surely do it again. If you become known as an "easy mark" for yelling and abuse, it will make your life at work many times harder. Unfortunately, many experienced nurses will test the waters with newer nurses during report, just to see how you'll react.

Here's my observation...I have noticed that bully nurses target certain individuals, while leaving other persons alone. Unfortunately, it's all about perception. If you are perceived as one who will not stand up for yourself, you'll be targeted for further harassment during report. If you're perceived as someone who will put up resistance and not allow anyone to yell at you, then people will quickly know to leave you alone.

Bullying is a crime of opportunity. Bullies tend to pick the most opportune targets: people who are less likely to respond in a defensive manner to the yelling. Also, if nothing is done, the bully will continue his/her rampage, because he/she knows that he/she can get away with it.

:yeahthat:

One way to reply is, Well that would be in the chart as you will see when you do YOUR assessment. Sometimes I think they want us to report everything so they don't have to look themselves. I even had a nurse ask me one time which arm the PICC was in, told her to pull back the covers and look when she got into the room, yeesh.

if the nurse in question is in the habit of interupting your report to ask questions, quit answering them when she asks. write it down and say you will cover that when you finish...smile and keep on with your report

gonzo1, ASN, RN

Specializes in ED, ICU, PSYCH, PP, CEN. Has 18 years experience.

Some nurses want you to tell them everything so they don't have to do an assessment or look anything up.

I don't need a nurse to give me a detailed report because I'm going to interview and assess the patient myself, thank you.

There's some nurses you can never make happy, just ignore them

It's hard when you're new to know when you need to listen to the feedback you're getting from the other staff and when you need to let it just roll off your back. As time goes on and you get more comfortable, you can with more confidence tell yourself that this or that person is just impossible to please and that your performance meets standards.

There's also the uncertainty from the side of the experienced staff working with a newbie. They might be more likely to grill the newbie than another colleague because they know from experience what to expect from their old colleagues. For good reason, they aren't comfortable yet accepting an unqualified report of "the patient is stable" from the newbie who may or may not be adept at their assessment skills.

However, there's a difference between asking "Do you know if... ?" and scolding "You should know this...!" It's mighty hard for a newbie to learn how to prioritize when from their perspective they're getting equally negative feedback for everything from not picking up on a patient's turning bad to not having the exact urine output on a stable patient. And if the reason the newbie didn't get the urine output recorded was because he/she was rightfully addressing a need of higher priority, it gets even more confusing! Because if the newbie tries to explain why this or that wasn't done, they may get slapped down by a curt "I don't want to hear excuses. Just get it right next time." It leaves one's head spinning as they try to sort out what they did wrong... which may have been nothing! There's nothing inherently wrong about not knowing everything or not getting everything done, especially as a newbie!

My favorite reply to people like that is: "I can't wait until I am as perfect as you...how long does it usually take?"

Don't let them get to you. I'm glad you care enough to want to improve.

Hang in there....you'll do fine.

i do think it's important to know if a pt has voided.

regardless of her complaints, it's never acceptable to be mean.

one of the most important lessons a new grad needs to learn, is the art of being assertive.

you're going to need to know how to assert yourself with your colleagues, the md's, your pts and their families.

there is an art to giving report.

i've tried it many different ways and finally decided to report on systems by exception, i.e.,

neuro: pt lethargic. md aware

cv: pt hypotensive and tachycardic. md ordered...

gi: abd distended, bowel sounds decreased, output of t-drain, 100mls. no bm x 4 days.

gu: foley output 400mls, cloudy, dark urine.

etc.

i find this way organizes my thoughts and events of the day.

anyway, as others have suggested, do not let anyone talk to you w/disrespect.

wishing you better days ahead.

leslie

Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.