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What are some of the "easier" NP programs to get accepted to?

Not exactly maybe for profit, but some that people have had success getting into with maybe not the best GPA or a ton of experience?

Gentleman_nurse

Specializes in Behavioral health.

Don't look for the easiest program to get in. On paper, NP programs seem alike but each has their 'personality'. Look for the best program for your learning needs so you will succeed. Are you an independent learner or need structure and direction? Do you learn best through lectures or projects? Do you like to work alone or with others? Are single or have family obligations? Do you want to particiapte in nursing extracurriculars or not. Are you a recent graduate or been out of school for many years?

It takes some effort to find the answers but you don't want to be an attrition statistic.

FullGlass, BSN, MSN, NP

Has 2 years experience. Specializes in Adult and Geriatric Primary Care.

Ignore all the fearmongering here. Many good primary care NP programs are now direct-entry (no RN experience required). Note: acute care NPs must have RN experience. All NP programs list their admission requirements right on their website. Your GPA is only one factor in the admissions process. You have an opportunity to sell yourself with your admissions essays and perhaps, an interview. And please don't go to a for-profit school what will accept anyone! Contrary to what many posters hear say, your school really does matter when getting your first job. Good luck.

Ignore all the fearmongering here. Many good primary care NP programs are now direct-entry (no RN experience required). Note: acute care NPs must have RN experience. All NP programs list their admission requirements right on their website. Your GPA is only one factor in the admissions process. You have an opportunity to sell yourself with your admissions essays and perhaps, an interview. And please don't go to a for-profit school what will accept anyone! Contrary to what many posters hear say, your school really does matter when getting your first job. Good luck.

I have a 3.2 CUM with both degrees. I have a 3.3 last 60 hours during nursing school. I don't think that is great. I would love to get into the best school possible, but I think I am an average candidate at best because I have also only been out of school for a little under a year.

This didn't stop me with my BSN, my school was competitive but I still got in with a lower GPA. I am bound and determined to do this and I will do anything within my power to accomplish it.

Mavrick, BSN, RN

Has 30 years experience. Specializes in 15 years in ICU, 22 years in PACU.

Ignore all the fearmongering here. Many good primary care NP programs are now direct-entry (no RN experience required). Note: acute care NPs must have RN experience. All NP programs list their admission requirements right on their website. Your GPA is only one factor in the admissions process. You have an opportunity to sell yourself with your admissions essays and perhaps, an interview. And please don't go to a for-profit school what will accept anyone! Contrary to what many posters hear say, your school really does matter when getting your first job. Good luck.

How disappointing.

Just what we need. Yet another slacker looking for an "easy "program, no experience required.

BCgradnurse, MSN, RN, NP

Has 11 years experience. Specializes in allergy and asthma, urgent care.

I cringe when I hear someone asking about "easy" programs to get into. You don't want to go to a program that has low admission standards. That may come back to haunt you when you can't find preceptors or have difficulty finding a job. If you are concerned about your GPA, then see if you can take a couple of graduate level classes without being formally accepted to a program. Do well, and show that you can handle grad level work. Then apply to the best programs you can afford.

I have nothing against Direct Entry programs, being a Direct Entry grad myself. But I went to a reputable program that only accepted 10% of applicants, found our clinical placements for us, and had very stringent standards for what constituted a passing grade. Stay away from programs that guarantee admission to anyone who can pay. The role of an NP carries enormous responsibility, and you owe it to yourself and your patients to get the best education you can. You have to earn the right to care for patients; not just pay for it.

Edited by BCgradnurse

How disappointing.

Just what we need. Yet another slacker looking for an "easy "program, no experience required.

No experience as a RN does not necessarily mean a slacker. For my instance I have my bachelors in biology. A masters in Surgical Assisting. I assisted in surgery as a first assistant. I Taught at a medical school as a TA, worked as a Medical assistant for a non profit clinic that provided over 15 specialties, and conducted research with one published. On top of all that I have started a community outreach program for children in low income urban area in Hampton Roads. All that was done before nursing school. So when a student is looking for a direct entry program it does not mean they were sitting on their behind and then in the spur of the moment thought, "I want to enter into a NP program" I think there are students that have come from a variety of backgrounds, and I am sure that the Direct NP program are not in the business of selecting slackers to attend such a rigorous program. It's never good to generalize. This site is a wonderful place for encouragement and support. It should remain that way

FullGlass, BSN, MSN, NP

Has 2 years experience. Specializes in Adult and Geriatric Primary Care.

How disappointing.

Just what we need. Yet another slacker looking for an "easy "program, no experience required.

I did not read the OP as being a slacker. There are plenty of good NPs that did not have a 4.0 GPA or tons of RN experience prior to their MSN program. There is a continuum of reputable NP schools, from extremely difficult to get into down through shady for profit programs. There are plenty of good solid state universities and colleges that offer good MSN programs that are not in the rarified echelon of extremely selective schools. In addition, RN experience is not a prerequisite for admission into most primary care NP programs, including the most selective schools.

Cococure

Has 7 years experience.

Look for a good school... not an easier one because like many others have said nursing schools look at the whole pic not just the GPA. I know nurses that have less than stellar GPA's but they applied to a reputable school and got in while the 4.0 nurses didn't get in ...why? Because the had the GPA but they may have lacked in their eassay etc. Find a school that is a good fit for you and apply...present good app with excellent letters and essay. Also get involved with your unit such as unit practice council or do projects for your unit. You can always work and pursue your degree so you will get more nursing experience. Don't sell yourself short because you feel that your GPA is holding you back! Just my 2cents

Good luck!

ICUman

Has 5 years experience. Specializes in Cardiac Cath Lab.

There is a continuum of reputable NP schools, from extremely difficult to get into down through shady for profit programs.

I seriously doubt there is a NP school that is "extremely difficult to get into".

Dodongo, APRN, NP

Has 7 years experience.

I seriously doubt there is a NP school that is "extremely difficult to get into".

I mean, I was waiting for someone to say this. I feel like I am always the one saying stuff like this and people's feelings get hurt and I end up as the bad guys in these threads.

There are some programs that are more stringent in their requirements and are therefore more difficult to gain entry into. Typically, the specialty APRN programs (psych, NNP, CNM, CRNA, ACNP) are much more difficult than FNP or AGNP, as they usually have experience requirements in related specialties. And certain well known universities have cohort size restrictions, so they are able to select higher caliber students to fill the limited number of seats (versus, let's say, Walden, that accepts a new cohort every month).

My program for example, an ACNP program, required 2 years ICU experience. That cut out a lot of people right there. Also everyone in my cohort had their CCRN and the average gpa was high because the university is just more selective. They also require "in person" (albeit virtual) lectures weekly, multiple mandatory on campus skills labs and testing, quite stringent clinical requirements, etc.

And let's be honest here, a certain type of person seeks out more difficult programs, and a certain type of person seeks out "easy" programs. Which type of provider do you think each of these people end up being?

Mavrick, BSN, RN

Has 30 years experience. Specializes in 15 years in ICU, 22 years in PACU.

I mean, I was waiting for someone to say this. I feel like I am always the one saying stuff like this and people's feelings get hurt and I end up as the bad guys in these threads.

There are some programs that are more stringent in their requirements and are therefore more difficult to gain entry into. Typically, the specialty APRN programs (psych, NNP, CNM, CRNA, ACNP) are much more difficult than FNP or AGNP, as they usually have experience requirements in related specialties. And certain well known universities have cohort size restrictions, so they are able to select higher caliber students to fill the limited number of seats (versus, let's say, Walden, that accepts a new cohort every month).

My program for example, an ACNP program, required 2 years ICU experience. That cut out a lot of people right there. Also everyone in my cohort had their CCRN and the average gpa was high because the university is just more selective. They also require "in person" (albeit virtual) lectures weekly, multiple mandatory on campus skills labs and testing, quite stringent clinical requirements, etc.

And let's be honest here, a certain type of person seeks out more difficult programs, and a certain type of person seeks out "easy" programs. Which type of provider do you think each of these people end up being?

Definition of slacker.

Irish_Mist, BSN, RN

Has 100 years experience. Specializes in Cardicac Neuro Telemetry.

How disappointing.

Just what we need. Yet another slacker looking for an "easy "program, no experience required.

And these slackers you speak of will potentially be prescribing medications and making important clinical decisions about patients. Scary and sad.

Definition of slacker.

My goodness people. I am not looking for a for-profit school. I am narrowing down the list of schools I am applying to and would like to send some of the applications to programs with maybe a little less stringet admissions. I will of course be sending applications to some of the "better" schools also

Gentleman_nurse

Specializes in Behavioral health.

My goodness people. I am not looking for a for-profit school. I am narrowing down the list of schools I am applying to and would like to send some of the applications to programs with maybe a little less stringet admissions. I will of course be sending applications to some of the "better" schools also

I get it. You're motivated. You want to apply to safety schools to reduce your risk of not having a place to attend and start. I say this out of caring and empathy. Remove the words "easier" and "less stringet" from your vocabulary. Decide what you want and need in your education and do not compromise! If you do not get admitted then reapply next cycle. If the less selective school happens to be the most compatible with you, go for it. Do not underestimate the difficulty and anguish attending a school that's a bad fit with your personality.

I get it. You're motivated. You want to apply to safety schools to reduce your risk of not having a place to attend and start. I say this out of caring and empathy. Remove the words "easier" and "less stringet" from your vocabulary. Decide what you want and need in your education and do not compromise! If you do not get admitted then reapply next cycle. If the less selective school happens to be the most compatible with you, go for it. Do not underestimate the difficulty and anguish attending a school that's a bad fit with your personality.

Thank you! I have literally made excel sheets with criterias and I am narrowing choices down that way.

Hello!

Did you make a decision on a school?

I am finding NP school virtually impossible to get into with my undergrad gpa of 2.7.

I have had my BSN for 13 years, 10 years ICU experience and worked as a school nurse for 2. I entered college at age 17. I am so sad that the study habits and work-ethic I had as a 17 year old are affecting my career choices as an adult.

Hello!

Did you make a decision on a school?

I am finding NP school virtually impossible to get into with my undergrad gpa of 2.7.

I have had my BSN for 13 years, 10 years ICU experience and worked as a school nurse for 2. I entered college at age 17. I am so sad that the study habits and work-ethic I had as a 17 year old are affecting my career choices as an adult.

You have great experience. There are schools out there that have the Min. GPA below 3.0. I would make a list of those and apply to all of them. Your experience will probably get you in somewhere.

Dodongo, APRN, NP

Has 7 years experience.

Hello!

Did you make a decision on a school?

I am finding NP school virtually impossible to get into with my undergrad gpa of 2.7.

I have had my BSN for 13 years, 10 years ICU experience and worked as a school nurse for 2. I entered college at age 17. I am so sad that the study habits and work-ethic I had as a 17 year old are affecting my career choices as an adult.

Either take some new classes to boost your GPA or retake the classes you did poorly in. You want to be an NP, show that you do. Put in a bit of effort. You can wait a year or two.

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