What does your nursing career repair bill say about you?

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Has 5 years experience.
I'm a veteran (HonDC, USMC, 1985) but I don't support the notion that veterans should be excused from any part of the application, admission, or graduation process anymore than should someone from any other group or class.

UNLV is trying to get Veterans to come into their school first. They're trying to be more supportive. The Veteran Stand Down was recently here in Vegas by US Vets Las Vegas and UNLV people were there. Nursing relatedness wasn't present. But the ones I met with were combat medics and gave me some insight on groups available to students like the NS---whatever it's called. The nationwide group for students to get information on the program the're going in, financial aid information specific for the program, asking students what the program is like, etc. I'm only talking about excusing veterans for entrance, not admission (I think they do preference for admittance) and not graduation which should be the same as everyone else since when we're in the program and we're doing the same thing, veterans are in the same class and would obviously recieve the same exposure of workload, etc as other students who are not veterans. I'm just saying all this stress and worry and anxiety and time being put into pre-reqs to get into a school that only gives you two chances to apply...it's just overhwhelming and annoying. Sometimes I wonder, if I'm getting into this program to use my GI Bill, am I only hurting myself with it being accelerated? Is accelerated recommended for those with a bachelor's? Just things I think about. I would hate to waste my GI bill on something that I won't make it in if it's mentally like SEAL training.

bgxyrnf, MSN, RN

1,208 Posts

Specializes in Med-Tele; ED; ICU. Has 10 years experience.
I'm just saying all this stress and worry and anxiety and time being put into pre-reqs to get into a school that only gives you two chances to apply...it's just overhwhelming and annoying.
Indeed it is... for everybody.

Sometimes I wonder, if I'm getting into this program to use my GI Bill, am I only hurting myself with it being accelerated? Is accelerated recommended for those with a bachelor's?
I went to an accelerated program... and I wouldn't change a thing. My goal was to minimize the time from the moment I decided on nursing to when I was working and the accelerated program did just that. We had no holidays nor breaks, just trudging along with most of my time focused on just one topic... graduating, licensing, and working.

It was far from the best educational experience but it suited my needs and, 7 years in to the profession, was sufficient.

I would hate to waste my GI bill on something that I won't make it in if it's mentally like SEAL training.
I would hate for you to waste your GI bill on anything. That golden ticket is one that you've worked very hard for and is a wonderful and well-deserved benefit. Am I understanding correctly that you're drawing some comparison of similarity between nursing school and SEAL training? If so, let that one go right now. Never having gone through special ops training, I can't really speak to that but from what I hear from my brother, a retired Recon Marine, there's more stress in one day of that than in all of nursing school combined.

Any successful veteran has the basic tools to navigate nursing school: The maturity to get up every morning and tend to those tasks set before you; the ability to work diligently under trying circumstances; the ability to perform when exhausted; the knowledge that our limits are far beyond what most people would typically believe; the ability to keep your mouth shut, your head down, and feet moving.

Presuming that you've got average intelligence and decent academic skills, success in nursing school is a near certainty presuming the foregoing.

Has 5 years experience.
Indeed it is... for everybody.

I went to an accelerated program... and I wouldn't change a thing. My goal was to minimize the time from the moment I decided on nursing to when I was working and the accelerated program did just that. We had no holidays nor breaks, just trudging along with most of my time focused on just one topic... graduating, licensing, and working.

It was far from the best educational experience but it suited my needs and, 7 years in to the profession, was sufficient.I would hate for you to waste your GI bill on anything. That golden ticket is one that you've worked very hard for and is a wonderful and well-deserved benefit. Am I understanding correctly that you're drawing some comparison of similarity between nursing school and SEAL training? If so, let that one go right now. Never having gone through special ops training, I can't really speak to that but from what I hear from my brother, a retired Recon Marine, there's more stress in one day of that than in all of nursing school combined.

Any successful veteran has the basic tools to navigate nursing school: The maturity to get up every morning and tend to those tasks set before you; the ability to work diligently under trying circumstances; the ability to perform when exhausted; the knowledge that our limits are far beyond what most people would typically believe; the ability to keep your mouth shut, your head down, and feet moving.

Presuming that you've got average intelligence and decent academic skills, success in nursing school is a near certainty presuming the foregoing.

Thank you, it's been very hard trying to find someone who is a veteran and is in nursing school or who has been through it that can help organize rational anxiety comparing oranges and apples (spec ops. vs nursing school). Maybe it's not that bad, but I'll always worry what it's like because 1. No student I know personally has ever stayed in touch with me when they went through it. 2. Everyone says it's a unique experience for everyone

I don't know what average intelligence is, maybe I have above average but not genius? Academic skills would greatly improve if I was using my GI bill because almost no one goes to the VA office on campus. A large majority of college students are just non-veteran and I think the VA GI bill office would understand my situation and make it a much more easier flow when it comes to maintaining my aid I need to live off of.

I'm at the point where I want to work 2 3-12 hr shifts or 6 12s in one week with a day off in between once I graduate so I can be debt free and gain lots of experience. I'm so sick of this college life, student loans and pell grant while sitting on top of my GI bill I'm saving for the more expensive school and not feeling like I have freedom. It's a weird feeling to explain, but once I get into nursing school AND use my gi bill, I'll feel so secure academically. The VA office on campus will help me feel more secure because I feel like I'll be able to see people I can trust and count on that will handle everything giving me a peace of mind while I devour my nursing school challeneges academically.

SmilingBluEyes

20,964 Posts

Specializes in Specializes in L/D, newborn, GYN, LTC, Dialysis. Has 26 years experience.
Sometimes I wish they could excuse veterans from taking the entrance exams and as long as we had good grades, and as long as we didn't have red flags on our background that would drive BONs to bar applicants from applying (domestic violence, felony, etc.) , just let us into the program. :banghead:

No. Nursing does not need lower or altered standards for anyone, including veterans. And I am one. 10 years USAF. There is a reason for the standards and everyone needs to meet them. You want the best and brightest working beside you and on YOUR loved ones, don't you?

Has 5 years experience.
No. Nursing does not need lower or altered standards for anyone, including veterans. And I am one. 10 years USAF. There is a reason for the standards and everyone needs to meet them. You want the best and brightest working beside you and on YOUR loved ones, don't you?

Yeah, that's true. But exempting entrance exam isn't much for standards being lowered. I did say only that and nothing else. Not school work, not grade inflation, not exam curving, not NCLEX lowering, not early graduation. None of that stuff. Just the entrance exams and that's it, and they're easier to get pass than anything else, I'm just not at THAT level yet. Almost, but no cigar. When I do take the entrance exams, hopefully I'll pass them and they won't be as bad as I thought.

Haijun

52 Posts

Have you gone to your school's VA office? How much schooling are you planning on doing? The reason I ask is you may easily be able to do pre-reqs & your bsn within the time frame of the gi bill. I highly encourage you to go talk to your VA office if you haven't already. The one at my school is awesome!

Regarding the entrance exams, do your research. Find out exactly which tests you need for any school you're planning on applying to and what score you need to get in. Prep for those exams. Take them early, very early, so you can take them again if you need to before the application deadline. These exam scores often make up a large part of admission criteria, so prep & study for them just as much as you would your pre-reqs.

TraviesaRN

29 Posts

I would have become a PA.

I would tell myself the following: Remember that coworkers are coworkers and nothing more, nothing less. Learn how to take nothing personally and not have to be liked by everybody. Learn to be okay with not being everybody's friend. Not everyone will like you, and that's okay. Realize that when management and the system is broken and corrupt, you cannot fix it from within, and it is best to move on instead of beating your head against a wall trying to change things. Trust your gut, because it is rarely wrong. Speak less and listen more: to patients, to coworkers, and especially at the nurses' station when you are "charting" and everyone around you is chatting. You learn a lot about the unit culture that way. Keep your ears open and your mouth shut, this is a very valuable skill. Lastly, for the love of God, AVOID THE VENDING MACHINES. Especially after midnight.

This is some really good advice......

SmilingBluEyes

20,964 Posts

Specializes in Specializes in L/D, newborn, GYN, LTC, Dialysis. Has 26 years experience.
Yeah, that's true. But exempting entrance exam isn't much for standards being lowered. I did say only that and nothing else. Not school work, not grade inflation, not exam curving, not NCLEX lowering, not early graduation. None of that stuff. Just the entrance exams and that's it, and they're easier to get pass than anything else, I'm just not at THAT level yet. Almost, but no cigar. When I do take the entrance exams, hopefully I'll pass them and they won't be as bad as I thought.
I do wish you the best. Good luck.

NotYourMamasRN

317 Posts

Specializes in Float Pool - A Little Bit of Everything. Has 6 years experience.

I would have not gotten so aggravated by the broken system and poor professionalism. Over the years, that has taken a big toll on me. I expected more from the career field and have been let down at every turn. When I tried to help people and do the right thing, I always met opposition. I can't work in a field like that, it eats at me every day and makes me hate it and the people I am surrounded by. I am exiting stage left!!!

What would my nursing career bill say about me? Mostly that I learned my life's lessons pretty darn well, and did a decent job of applying them to my new (to me, anyway) career.

Things I would've done a bit differently:

(1) Been a bit more assertive - missed out on some really cool stuff by not speaking up more;

(2) Don't assume that being male in a female-dominated cohort will afford you some special protection - invoke (1) above as needed;

(3) If (1) don't cut it - take your grievances up the food chain & let the Powers That Be deal with it. It's their responsibility, not yours.

(4) Be proud of what you've accomplished - remember those who didn't make the cut, and never underestimate the challenge of becoming and actually being a nurse (even if it's 'just an LVN'...) ;)

Has 5 years experience.
When I tried to help people and do the right thing, I always met opposition.

The most relatable thing I've ever seen..