What Kind of Nurse Do You Want To Be?

Published

Alright so I'm in my first year of college and I love talking about future plans with my fellow students and hearing what they want to be and why :)

So what kind of nurse do you want to be?

Ruby Vee, BSN

67 Articles; 14,022 Posts

Specializes in CCU, SICU, CVSICU, Precepting & Teaching. Has 40 years experience.

Hopefully, you all want to be competent nurses. It doesn't matter what specialty you choose -- or if you even choose one. Mine chose me. But wherever you wind up, make sure to be a competent nurse. Compassion and caring are all very nice, but they can be faked. Competence cannot be faked, and is the most important quality you can have as a nurse.

And please be the nurse that takes criticism gracefully, even if it is not gracefully given. Both giving and receiving of criticism are art forms. Those who do not have the art of delivering criticism artfully may still have truths to tell that you can benefit from hearing.

Above all, a good one.

I imagine you're asking specialties though. I'm not sure - I've been interested in ED nursing, but I'm keeping an open mind/heart until I'm done with school, after I've experienced my clinicals. And, frankly, it's going to depend on the job market for nurses here in a few years - it might be that I don't have the luxury of being choosy.

hstutz86

115 Posts

L&D Nurse- my aim is to be a Nurse Midwife!

J.Molina

45 Posts

Operating room nurse!

guest973135

34 Posts

Good point, Ruby. I agree that being a competent nurse is the most important part of being a nurse.

So how did your specialty choose you? How did you know it was the right fit and why do you enjoy it?

smartassmommy

324 Posts

Has 1 years experience.

When I get there, I want to be a safe, competent nurse. Right now I'm drawn to the idea of working with babies with NAS and their parents, but my mind is open.

Paola2319

64 Posts

Well I'm going for my BSN in spring 2017, hopefully I get accepted. I would like to be a cardiac nurse or pediatric nurse , then go back to school for my nurse practitioner

Specializes in Family Clinic.

I few years back I thought I had to be an L&D nurse and then become a CNM. At this point I just want a job lol! I honestly don't know if I want to settle into a specialty for a few years unless something was impossible to pass up. I love everything about nursing and I want to be wherever I'm needed and try everything I can. I want to be above average, well rounded, and a complete asset to any work place I go to. First things first, I need to get accepted into the nursing program. 4 months until its time to apply!

Ruby Vee, BSN

67 Articles; 14,022 Posts

Specializes in CCU, SICU, CVSICU, Precepting & Teaching. Has 40 years experience.
Good point, Ruby. I agree that being a competent nurse is the most important part of being a nurse.

So how did your specialty choose you? How did you know it was the right fit and why do you enjoy it?

I was working on a Heme/Onc floor, and had 15 patients at night -- all with multiple IV antibiotics, TPN and multiple transfusions, chemo, pain medication, anti-emetics, etc. I also had about 15 visitors staying all night to "help." One particular visitor had a habit of putting on the call light to demand that I fetch orange juice, extra blankets, pillows, change the TV channel or the thermostats for HER comfort. Her husband was fine -- SHE wanted the TLC. Finally, I told her that I had 15 patients and I was way behind in taking care of them because I'd spent so much time with her. The thermostat was right where she left it, and she knew where the linen cart and snacks for visitors were -- I'd be back in an hour to check on her husband, but she could take care of herself.

My manager suggested that maybe I was ready to move to the ICU, because perhaps I wasn't such a good fit for Heme.

The next day, the MICU manager called to schedule an interview.

I found ICU to be fascinating. It was interesting, challenging and there was always something new to learn. The patients were either sick or were transferred out. Visitors weren't allowed to stay overnight -- in fact, they were only allowed in for 15 minutes every two hours. Over the years, I've done MICU, SICU, CCU and CTICU and they've all been fascinating!

Quota, BSN, RN

329 Posts

Specializes in Oncology, OCN. Has 4 years experience.
I was working on a Heme/Onc floor, and had 15 patients at night -- all with multiple IV antibiotics, TPN and multiple transfusions, chemo, pain medication, anti-emetics, etc. I also had about 15 visitors staying all night to "help." One particular visitor had a habit of putting on the call light to demand that I fetch orange juice, extra blankets, pillows, change the TV channel or the thermostats for HER comfort. Her husband was fine -- SHE wanted the TLC. Finally, I told her that I had 15 patients and I was way behind in taking care of them because I'd spent so much time with her. The thermostat was right where she left it, and she knew where the linen cart and snacks for visitors were -- I'd be back in an hour to check on her husband, but she could take care of herself.

My manager suggested that maybe I was ready to move to the ICU, because perhaps I wasn't such a good fit for Heme.

The next day, the MICU manager called to schedule an interview.

I found ICU to be fascinating. It was interesting, challenging and there was always something new to learn. The patients were either sick or were transferred out. Visitors weren't allowed to stay overnight -- in fact, they were only allowed in for 15 minutes every two hours. Over the years, I've done MICU, SICU, CCU and CTICU and they've all been fascinating!

Ha, sounds like something that could happen to me in my future. Getting ready to apply to nursing school in January for Fall start myself. I envision myself being fine dealing with patients but having trouble with their family members potentially. Time will tell.

I don't have any specific goals of what departments I'd want to work in. Very much see how school and clinicals go and go from there. The idea of eventually working in drug trials/research appeals greatly. I'm in the biotech industry now doing diagnostic testing and previously worked in drug research. Already have a firm grounding in generally how drug studies work etc. Though I think I'd be happy in a number of areas as long as I was challenged with new things to learn and ways to develop.

---One of the few with very little interest in L&D it seems from reading around here...

laschai

23 Posts

I'm a senior in high school right now. I'm applying to 4 year BSN programs. Actually, I already applied to 7. For specialty, at this point I want to be either a trauma nurse working in a major trauma center or an L&D nurse.