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Unrealistic nursing students

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I did. But, she doesn't know how unrealistic necessarily their goals are. It doesn't matter how unrealistic their goals are anyway. It's their life. Why do we need to judge these people for their choices? Or care why they got nursing degrees?

I agree. the whole texting thing is rude, I understand that. But ambition should not be frowned upon. I felt it was unnecessary for the OP to judge those people on that aspect of their behavior. People go into nursing for different reasons - some people want a career change, some people want the higher income, some people actually have always wanted to go to nursing school but for whatever reason never had that opportunity and now they're finally pursuing it, etc. Asking about vacancies is not unprofessional; those people saw an opportunity to get feedback from people who may have the information that they inquired about. It's their livelihood we're talking about, of course they'll be hungry for any bit of advantage.

PMFB-RN, BSN, RN

Specializes in burn ICU, SICU, ER, Traum Rapid Response.

I did. But, she doesn't know how unrealistic necessarily their goals are. It doesn't matter how unrealistic their goals are anyway. It's their life. Why do we need to judge these people for their choices? Or care why they got nursing degrees?

It's simple. We do so in the hope that others who contemplating making life changing decisions based on unrealistic expectations may learn. Those of us who have been in health care a long time are in a position to know how unrealistic the expectation expressed in the OP are.

I didn't notice any judging going on in this discussion so far.

Where is nursing purgatory Sing Song? I really don't get the whole second degree, 10th degree... who gives a #$#. A person is a nurse is a nurse. So what? Kids in college can choose nursing for money or passion and person at 70 can choose it for money or passion. What matters is that people get the opportunity to see nursing as it really is. I remember asking nurses on the floor prior to becoming a nurse (family scene) They were like, " oh, yeah it's awesome". Now I know that a nurse can get called out if they complain about working conditions. Ex. Patient X states that nurse Z could not fill their water because too much going on... So, now I know why those nurses told me that. And no nurse wants to seem like they can't handle their job. SOOOOO... do you tell the nurses to be how it really is? It's a no win situation. Even if you tell mgt that you have too much to do... "Oh, so you're saying you don't have the time mgt. skills to do your job?" You can't win.

And some of us did...

So what?

Mine was even worse in the minds of many... I was a DEMSN...I had all that, too, but I ended up in nursing purgatory for my first three years. If I'd known that's where I'd have ended up, I may not have done nursing. I certainly questioned myself a number of times.

Finally, though, things did break my way... and my only regret about nursing is that I didn't do it 20 years earlier (which would mean that I'd be starting to eye retirement instead of trying to figure out how to milk another 20 years out of this gig)

Straight up: I came looking for a secure job, that I wouldn't hate, which paid good money... check, check, and check.

Actually that's my only real regret - that I never thought of or considered doing this 20 or 30 years ago. Back then a medical career in a hospital just wasn't on my radar - not even a little bit. I never really spent much time in or near hospitals, doctors or nurses in my younger years. I did have a few older aunts who were nurses back like in the 1950's and 60's and they got out of it to do something else - my take from them was that nurses back then weren't treated very well and not respected, especially by doctors. And there's nothing wrong with second-degree nurses. I had a bachelor's degree in management before I started back to nursing school.

Ok, so this one brought me out of lurkdom (a lurkdom so long, I forgot my account info and had to create a new one - but I digress...)

Who are you to determine whether someone's ambitions are "realistic" or not? I am a second career, post graduate nursing student. For many, if not most of us - we've already had full careers in other occupations, and are simply looking for something new. (I'm retired military, and collect full retirement pay, so I'm not desperate for a nursing paycheck by any stretch.) Nursing is, and has been a personal goal of mine for quite a while.

I'm sorry those new grads didn't come across as sufficiently humble enough for you, but truth is - they already have bachelor's and masters degrees (as well as experience) in other fields. All of their eggs are NOT in the nursing basket, so if the bottom falls out, they're qualified to do something else. There's a certain level of confidence that comes in knowing that. Their dreams and goals are just that - THEIR'S. It has nothing to do with you, or what you think is feasible or appropriate.

iPink, BSN, RN

Specializes in Critical Care, Postpartum.

I'm a second career changer. When I was in my ABSN program, majority of us had plans to only do 1-2 years on the floor and then move on to grad school to become NPs, with some wanting to become CRNAs or move into Administration. Fast forward, some student got jobs through great connections within 1-2 months after graduation, while others had to struggle like many other graduate nurses and submit resume after resume until we landed our jobs 6-12 months after. Then when we finally start working on the floor, we reflect back on our "plans." What was I thinking? There is such a gap between nursing school and real life nursing. I still touch base with some of my classmates and grad school is not even a thought at this point.

I now cringe when I hear new nurses say they're going to grad school a year after being on the floor. The first year, you're just scratching the surface.

JustKeepDriving

Specializes in Forensic Psychiatry.

When I started taking college seriously I was going to independently save the freaking world!

Goals change though - however I'm still going to save the damn world... maybe next year.:yes:

I'm totally with the OP in that it's always best to act and dress professionally when meeting employers. However - I disagree with the idea of trying to crush someone's dreams. Even if they aren't entirely unrealistic.

Like, When I was 6 I wanted to be a unicorn. I would still kind of like to be a unicorn... but I know that it isn't going to happen. Not realistic.

However, these individuals dreams aren't unrealistic. They can be accomplished. They might take time and experience, but eventually they can be done. If they really expect that they're going to be hospital lawyers, medical writers, nurse managers - right off the bat without some flexibility then they might be in a bit of a shock. However, there is nothing unrealistic about having those goals to work themselves up to.

Another thing - goals change. ALL THE TIME. My goals when I started college, even my goals right before graduating nursing school... are wayyyy different now. Experience changes everything - but everyone has to start somewhere and striving to be superman is much better than reserving oneself to be peon #199004821.

My goals have ranged from wanting to be a semi-homeless beat poet type self exploring drifter "student" (soooo much Absinthe) to getting Ph.D in Psychology and doing research my whole life. There is also part of a holistic medicine degree that I never quite finished up in Canada.... I also got accepted for graduate school for social work - one for medical social work and one for forensic social work... I turned down both and finished my prerequisites and went for an ABSN instead (It fit my personal goals of saving the world better).

I have also wanted to be various types of nurse... and nurse-psych-criminology-pubic health type hybrid thing.

SO MUCH CHOICE!

However, the job market does dictate things so forensic psychiatric nurse it is! And some days I LOVE IT... others well... I flip flop between thinking the PA, PMHNP, FNP might be an even more awesome way to save the world.....

The fun part about life isn't necessarily being there... it's getting there.

Maybe it's the fact that I've spent so much of my time in school that I've become desensitized by the lofty dreams of college students - or I truly understand that sometimes... Individuals with big dreams - Sometimes accomplish them. And those dreams - especially those that want to save the freaking world... can do a whole lot of good for a whole lot of people. Sometimes all it culminates in is a really good coping skill to get through a not so great day at work... but motivation is never a bad thing.

OP, the students you encountered are undergrad, grad and now nursing students, at least one degree of which is to the tune of $80K. If you stay in school, then student loans can be deferred. There are some nursing positions one can find that you can get student loan forgiveness for working in certain areas. Most of these students have been in school for 6 years or so. Sounds like professional students to me. Especially if they think appropriate to be playing on their cell phones, and being generally disrespectful. This group will be rather interesting in clinicals.....

cardiacfreak, ADN

Specializes in Hospice.

Tis the season to be jolly, fa la la la la la la la la. :singing: Why are people so sensitive lately?

nekozuki, LPN

Specializes in Pediatrics.

There are smatterings of those who really want to be a bedside nurse but I find a greater number interested at the bedside as a stepping stone to the "big paying" jobs.

I find these kind of sneering sentiments to be more "unrealistic" than a student working their butt off to meet CRNA requirements. There is nothing dishonorable about wanting to be involved in healthcare outside of bedside nursing. One of the best parts of this profession is its broad range, where one can utilize their skills in so many different capacities. Nursing is a great and rewarding job, but it's a job nonetheless, and looking down your nose at someone with different motivations for this job seems odd to me. In fact, I regularly see those warm, fuzzy people who dream of being a bedside nurse drop out when they realize reality is a 6:1 patient to nurse ratio, and there is little time for the care/comfort they dreamed of giving. The ones who endure? Those heathens who set high professional goals and intend to eventually move on from bedside nursing. For a forum where we all rant and rave about how ridiculous this profession can be, I'm surprised at the attitudes toward those who perhaps want to move beyond it someday.

I think what bugs nurses at the clinical site is when almost all the students say they're going to be CRNAs. And they feel the need to tell everyone. 'Cause, like, their cousin's wife is one and she totally makes, like, 200k a year.

Obviously, they can't all go on to be CRNAs. And, yeah, it's kinda funny. Like when an entire class of little kids say they're all going to be firemen or ballerinas.

Now, some will go on to reach that goal. They're the ones who are organized, focused and realistic. They know what they got to do and they do it. And they're the one's who don't feel the need to let everyone know that they're just working the floor until they can get into CRNA school.

The ones who are unrealistic with vague, uninformed plans might make it, but not without some rude schocks along the way.

PMFB-RN, BSN, RN

Specializes in burn ICU, SICU, ER, Traum Rapid Response.

Who are you to determine whether someone's ambitions are "realistic" or not?

People who have been there, done that.

I am a second career, post graduate nursing student. For many, if not most of us - we've already had full careers in other occupations, and are simply looking for something new. (I'm retired military, and collect full retirement pay, so I'm not desperate for a nursing paycheck by any stretch.) Nursing is, and has been a personal goal of mine for quite a while.

Great! Welcome! I love to see second career people come to nursing. I am one myself and feel they bring a wonderful diversity to nursing sorely lacking in most other health professions.

Now imagine that you were speaking to a group of young people who had just joined the military and were waiting to ship off to their initial training. Imagine if these people were excitedly telling you that as initial trainees they were going to get to stay in a nice hotel rather than barrack or dorms. That rather than eating in a mess hall they were going to have their meals delivered by room service. Imagine they tell you that since they already have college degrees they will never be required to deploy to a war zone. Imagine that they told you about their assumption that since they have a college education, and experience in a previous career they fully expected to all make general or admiral within 10 to 15 years.

Think of what you would be thinking in that situation and you can then understand what the OP and some of us were feeling.

But surely, you could make this thing easier to read!

I didn't find it hard to read. Somewhat long-winded maybe, but IMO his writing is excellent.

I find these kind of sneering sentiments to be more "unrealistic" than a student working their butt off to meet CRNA requirements. There is nothing dishonorable about wanting to be involved in healthcare outside of bedside nursing. One of the best parts of this profession is its broad range, where one can utilize their skills in so many different capacities. Nursing is a great and rewarding job, but it's a job nonetheless, and looking down your nose at someone with different motivations for this job seems odd to me. In fact, I regularly see those warm, fuzzy people who dream of being a bedside nurse drop out when they realize reality is a 6:1 patient to nurse ratio, and there is little time for the care/comfort they dreamed of giving. The ones who endure? Those heathens who set high professional goals and intend to eventually move on from bedside nursing. For a forum where we all rant and rave about how ridiculous this profession can be, I'm surprised at the attitudes toward those who perhaps want to move beyond it someday.

I see nothing wrong with this myself - so you do a few years of anywhere from 4:1 to 6:1 bedside nursing then move on. Do your time in purgatory cleaning poop, dealing with dementia and violent patients etc. I myself do not advertise my plans, hopes etc but maybe eventually I will have an MSN and can spend the last few years of my career as a nursing instructor - a good way IMO to finish out a career. By then I should have some interesting stories and practical advice for students.

I think they were unrealistic and didn't do their homework on what the job market is really like out there. To go back to school to get your nursing degree and think you can just get a job in the legal department of a hospital or become a medical writer is ridiculous. Those of us who went to school to get a standard floor nurse position had a hard enough time as it is. They are in for a rude awakening once they make it through their program (and good luck with that).

My 17 yr old daughter wants to be a CRNA. I hope you all don't try to crush her dream. I think she's awesome. I'll have to tell her to keep her mouth shut once she gets to nursing school, so she doesn't annoy anyone.

LadyFree28, BSN, RN

Specializes in Pediatrics, Rehab, Trauma.

My 17 yr old daughter wants to be a CRNA. I hope you all don't try to crush her dream. I think she's awesome. I'll have to tell her to keep her mouth shut once she gets to nursing school' date=' so she doesn't annoy anyone.[/quote']

If she is objective to the reality of nursing surely her "dreams" won't be crushed.

Two cents from an objective now nurse (8 years total counting 7 years of LPN) who had been told by a nurse NOT to go into nursing 20 years ago (aka the last financial crisis, Medicare/Healthcare upheaval/Start of corporization of health care).

LadyFree28, BSN, RN

Specializes in Pediatrics, Rehab, Trauma.

I see nothing wrong with this myself - so you do a few years of anywhere from 4:1 to 6:1 bedside nursing then move on. Do your time in purgatory cleaning poop' date=' dealing with dementia and violent patients etc. I myself do not advertise my plans, hopes etc but maybe eventually I will have an MSN and can spend the last few years of my career as a nursing instructor - a good way IMO to finish out a career. By then I should have some interesting stories and practical advice for students.[/quote']

This is my actual semi-retirement plan NP/community/clinical education ; planning on giving back to the profession is not realistic at all....call it the circle of life, lol. :)

My 17 yr old daughter wants to be a CRNA. I hope you all don't try to crush her dream. I think she's awesome. I'll have to tell her to keep her mouth shut once she gets to nursing school, so she doesn't annoy anyone.

My best wishes to her and I hope she makes it. Hey it's OK to have hopes and dreams.... One thing a person will find sometimes is that their exact route to where they eventually want to be may turn out to be a bit different than they originally imagined. But that's OK as long as you arrive at where you eventually want to be. And one word of advice you might want to pass on to her - It's actually best to keep your mouth shut in nursing school regardless of what your plans are or aren't. Just a kind word of advice from someone who's been there, done that. I really hated nursing school (some people love it) but it was something I had to go through to get to where I am now and where I want to be in the future....

There's absolutely nothing wrong with wanting to be a CRNA as long as you realize whats involved. I really wouldn't want to be one myself. Yes, the six figure salaries are nice, I would take that in a heartbeat, but there is a reason why CRNA's are paid that. I wouldn't want the stress to be honest. It's a job where you are not allowed to make a mistake, otherwise someone dies. But if your daughter is the type who pays close attention to detail, is a very meticulous person, logical and methodical etc etc maybe she's already a future CRNA....

Edited by AZ_LPN_8_26_13

Ruby Vee, BSN

Specializes in CCU, SICU, CVSICU, Precepting & Teaching.

The next financial crisis.....default of student loans.

I, too am meeting new grads who didn't succeed at their first choice profession so went for a nursing degree as a "quick fix" or a stepping stone to NP, CRNA or hospital management. Many, if not most of them truly believe they'll never have to get their hands dirty at the bedside. That seems to be a failure on the part of the new grad to research what the choice of profession actually entails as well as a failure on the part of the nursing schools to educate on the role of the nurse.

What I cannot understand is why, if you have a mountain of debt from a profession that you've already failed at, would you then go back to school and incurr more debt to try out *another* profession you haven't adequately investigated. Are parents failing to educate on debt and the consequences? Are students just too arrogant to think that job shortages, student debt or the necessity of supporting oneself are ever going to apply to them?

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