Jump to content
What’s your favorite allnurses.com feature? Read more... ×
moreoreo moreoreo (Member)

Too Many Visits - advice for teachers?

School   (3,729 Views 23 Comments)
1 Like; 2,577 Visitors; 218 Posts
If you find this topic helpful leave a comment.
advertisement

You are reading page 2 of Too Many Visits - advice for teachers?. If you want to start from the beginning Go to First Page.

I am currently dealing with this same problem, except I am in a middle school, 6th-8th with almost 900 students. I am only here 3 days a week, but see about 60+ daily. I have 14 daily meds also. My visits start as soon as I walk in the building. I have a school based health center in my campus and since they opened, my visits have tripled. I have no words of wisdom but hopefully someone else does!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I am currently dealing with this same problem, except I am in a middle school, 6th-8th with almost 900 students. I am only here 3 days a week, but see about 60+ daily. I have 14 daily meds also. My visits start as soon as I walk in the building. I have a school based health center in my campus and since they opened, my visits have tripled. I have no words of wisdom but hopefully someone else does!

Of the 60+ would you say the visits are warranted? Of my 40-50 a day, I usually send 2 home, and I'd say at least a dozen are for things like "I bumped my elbow on my chair."

I don't want to point fingers but in all my fussy analysis I wonder if it's in part due to teachers jumping to attention at every tiny thing (I recall commiseration on this board between nurses about how we are disinclined to run to a child who has fallen down... it's something I feel strongly about, that when we don't give a child five seconds to even decide that they're ok, of course they will opt for the attention-getting "it hurts" route). I imagine in their classrooms they sometimes are too quick to coddle and end with "go to the nurse!" I have teachers who bring in a student with a scrape who are more antsy than the student and are trying to get my immediate attention while I'm already working on someone else. When I smile and say to sit down and I'll be there later they say "ok the nurse is going to be RIGHT here!"

This might sound mean but I'm starting to train myself not to jump out of my own seat every time a child walks in. You can do a lot of across the room assessment in the few minutes it takes to complete the task you're working on. I feel like part of why the school doesn't realize I have other duties is because I always get up the second they walk in.

I have tried to implement so many things, from having children apply their own bandaids, to not sending ice packs out of the office, to keeping visits shorter, to making them longer, to having conversations with children and parents alike for coming too frequently... we had a meeting with our principals and are sending out numbers and suggestions (I've seen 33% of the entire student body in just a few weeks!) and if this all fails then I will just try not to lose it when we end up with 100 daily like we did last year :cry:

Edited by moreoreo

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Of the 60+ would you say the visits are warranted? Of my 40-50 a day, I usually send 2 home, and I'd say at least a dozen are for things like "I bumped my elbow on my chair."

I don't want to point fingers but in all my fussy analysis I wonder if it's in part due to teachers jumping to attention at every tiny thing (I recall commiseration on this board between nurses about how we are disinclined to run to a child who has fallen down... it's something I feel strongly about, that when we don't give a child five seconds to even decide that they're ok, of course they will opt for the attention-getting "it hurts" route). I imagine in their classrooms they sometimes are too quick to coddle and end with "go to the nurse!" I have teachers who bring in a student with a scrape who are more antsy than the student and are trying to get my immediate attention while I'm already working on someone else. When I smile and say to sit down and I'll be there later they say "ok the nurse is going to be RIGHT here!"

This might sound mean but I'm starting to train myself not to jump out of my own seat every time a child walks in. You can do a lot of across the room assessment in the few minutes it takes to complete the task you're working on. I feel like part of why the school doesn't realize I have other duties is because I always get up the second they walk in.

I have tried to implement so many things, from having children apply their own bandaids, to not sending ice packs out of the office, to keeping visits shorter, to making them longer, to having conversations with children and parents alike for coming too frequently... we had a meeting with our principals and are sending out numbers and suggestions (I've seen 33% of the entire student body in just a few weeks!) and if this all fails then I will just try not to lose it when we end up with 100 daily like we did last year :cry:

Well, because I have a School Based Health Center, I am required to refer every student that has a consent form to be seen. BUT I am supposed to assess them first, which is frustrating because if a kid wants to go there, I can't deny them. So why do i assess them? My SBHC serves 2 schools and is owned by a separate company, not the school district. I have not sent home any kids from either school this week.

With that said, I used to triage before sending to SBHC. I would only send kids that i would otherwise send home or advise to be seen by MD. But the owner of the SBHC went to my boss and threatened to close down the center if I didn't start sending more kids......

I always make the kids sit for at least a minute while I finish what I am doing, usually charting on the last student. This gives me time to assess them without them knowing I am assessing them. Tells me A LOT when I just watch body language.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Y'all are making me happy about my 45 high schoolers who visit each day. I love the different ways nurses express themselves to teachers and I will be stealing some of these tactics. I think after 2 PM the teachers have just given up...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I haven't read everyone's replies to this thread yet- but here's a letter I use: I am elementary school though.

Guidelines for Nurse's Office

Reasonable Expectations for Self-Care in Classroom:

As the new school year begins, it is a good time to educate the students as to when it is appropriate to come to the nurse's office. This will help prevent students from misusing their education time by spending it in the nurse's office for minor complaints.

Our mission is to provide a safe, healthy learning environment in our school and to keep the student in CLASS for optimal learning. All students sent to the nurse's office MUST have a Nurse Referral Slip filled out with both first and last name, primary complaint and room number. We understand that emergency situations occur where this is not possible, but is the expected daily procedure.

Each classroom teacher will be given a Ziploc bag of gloves, band-aids, gauze pads and other items to allow for minor cuts/scrapes to be handled in the classroom. If you are in need of band-aids, gloves, etc please notify the nurse and she will provide them. Each teacher will be informed of students in his/her classroom with chronic health conditions or potential for emergent conditions.

Questions to ask students before sending them to the nurse's office during class: Have they used the restroom? Hungry? Tired? These are not emergent reasons to see the nurse.

Students should stay in class:

-Approximately the first 45 minutes of instructional time UNLESS they are vomiting, have hit their head, are having breathing issues (including known asthmatics), broken bones, pink eye, injury to eye, loss of consciousness or seizure, lice or bleeding profusely.

-When an old, healed abrasion (scab) is merely sore or itches. This is part of the natural healing process.

-When there is soreness from an old injury. If no bump, bruise, swelling or redness or it is more than 24 hours old- no ice should be given- it will not help at that point.

-If a student has a bandage that was applied by a physician-I am not able to reapply or change it (without doctor's written orders) I can only reinforce it.

-When a student regularly finds excuses to leave class and rarely has to go or stay home because of illness.

-When a student frequently asks to go to the nurse at the same time of day.

Reasons to call Nurse to site/location for assessment:

-Loss of consciousness

-Bone/Joint injury (possible dislocation/fracture)

-Seizure activity.

-Serious falls/accidents that involve head/neck/spine.

-Signs of allergic reaction: Swelling of mouth/lips, hives, vomiting, nausea, hoarseness, and wheezing or abdominal pain.

Valid reasons for leaving class and coming to nurse's office:

-Vomiting (not just spitting up phlegm)

-Bleeding (minor scrapes can be handled in the classroom)

-Breathing difficulties (wheezing, shortness of breath)

-Bone/joint injury (I can also come to location if needed)

-Undiagnosed rash.

-Splinters- imbedded splinters cannot be removed, but will be cleaned/covered.

-Nosebleed- student should pinch own nose closed with Kleenex, breathe through mouth and walk to clinic.

-Suspected head lice/excessive head scratching.

-Human or animal bite.

-Injury to eye

*For students who complain of headache or stomachache, and it is close to their lunchtime (these symptoms may indicate thirst or hunger): 1. Give them a drink of water, 2. Have them put their head on desk for a minute or two (if possible) and when time, 3. Have them go to lunch. 4. If they continue to complain after lunch/recess, then they should be sent to the nurse's office.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Some teachers will always feel like it is "not their job" to handle anything even remotely medical, and with 30 kids in a class, they might not have time to ask the student follow up questions. And depending on the student, they might just be happy to get them out of the classroom.

But that being said, they do need to take a moment to fill out a pass and hopefully in that moment will realize that it is ridiculous to be sending a student who's "foot fell asleep" to your office.

When I first started, I redid my passes with only 6 options for the teachers to pick from, and if they write one in like "stomach ache", those kids are in and out as fast as possible and I write on the bottom of the note that "unless their symptoms change, they should remain in class."

With a lot of staff communication I've been able to bring my numbers down from to 70+ when I started, to an average of 30 daily (not including meds or treatments). There are still some teachers who will ALWAYS over send, but a lot did respond in a positive manner.

I'd love to see a copy of the passes you created... would you mind sharing? Thank you!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
advertisement

I know this is an old post, adding this for someone who may be looking for advice in the future: before you ever accept the pass ask "would this stop you from playing if you were home?". You would be surprised how many turn around and go back to class.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's an old post, I know but I remember when I first started I had more than 50 students in my office the first day. But as I been here longer and I gained a reputation and experience, my numbers have dwindled to only 10 or less. I made it a priority to let teachers know and that if they can please check on students first in the classroom, if nothing works, then please send to me. It works, plus I do not accept students between passing periods and must have a pass, unless it's an emergency.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Then send it to a couple of teachers at a time.. theres more than one way to get the point across..

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have had one on one conversations with teachers before to try to get at the root of why they specifically send so many kids. Often, they just think they should!!

At my prior school, there were approximately 85 teachers. I often explained to my "frequent flier teachers." I am so glad not all teachers send 8 students a day like you. If they did, then I would see 680 kids a day (half the school).

But truthfully, anything above 40-50 daily means you are not giving proper assessments.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi there!

I use a Power Point in the beginning of the year that delineates "when to visit the nurse" and "when not to visit the nurse." I was once encouraged by a fellow nurse to "shut the door!" to the office and put a note (back at 11:20am, etc... call for emergencies only). I thought she was crazy but it does decrease visits. I used this trick to go into each individual classroom, put my face out there, and give a 10 minute presentation at the beginning of each year.

I typically have from 50-70 visits a day in my 200 student school with a handful of chronic students. I am the sole school nurse. After completing the presentation, this number drops to 30-50 which is extremely beneficial for not only my mental sanity but also to prepare for the school year/immunization time/etc. I have found that it is key to get it done in the first month to avoid school nurse headaches!

Good luck!

CoastalSchoolNurse

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
×