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Tonight's Boston Med: nurses featured!

Nurses   (13,142 Views 88 Comments)
by HappyNurse2005 HappyNurse2005, RN (Member) Member

HappyNurse2005 is a RN and specializes in LDRP.

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You are reading page 5 of Tonight's Boston Med: nurses featured!. If you want to start from the beginning Go to First Page.

iPink has 5+ years experience and specializes in Critical Care, Postpartum.

1,412 Posts; 12,637 Profile Views

I thought there was an "unsubscribe" button? Obviously this thread has turned into a debate that I'm not interested in reading.

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PatMac10,RN has 6 years experience as a ADN, BSN, RN and specializes in Nursing Education, CVICU, Float Pool.

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Mzchas,

I'm sorry if our debating is a major turn-off. I am not going to try reason with people who refuse to look at the situation from the patients side and who I don't even know. I have my beleives and as I said they may chabge in the future. Regardless of what some of these well seasoned nurses say I will have to make my own opinions and judgements on what I feel a nurse should do in such a situation one day. I do appreciate the more suggestive comments more than the agressive ones. As far as my standpoint, even if I stand alone. The nurse lacked tact, if you don't like the opinion I'm sorry, you'll live. I try to listen to the comments of others and consider them.

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JulieCVICURN is a BSN, RN and specializes in CVICU.

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PatMac, I don't know if you think I'm being aggressive or rude, but just so you know, I'm not being condescending by calling you naive. I really do remember thinking the same way before I got done with nursing school. Being in the trenches working as an RN has made me realize that it's not as cut and dried as being polite and nice to everyone in the name of good customer service. Sometimes the best thing you can do for a patient is make them aware that coddling time is done and nobody's buying their line of bull anymore. And sometimes, doing it in a less than polite, friendly manner, is the only thing that works.

You may be right, I certainly don't know how YOU are going to behave once you're on the floor. But I would love to hear back in two or three years and see if your perspective has changed.

I thought there was an "unsubscribe" button? Obviously this thread has turned into a debate that I'm not interested in reading.
Yeah, it's a darn shame how this pesky Internet (and this thread in particular) force their way onto your screen against your will.

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iPink has 5+ years experience and specializes in Critical Care, Postpartum.

1,412 Posts; 12,637 Profile Views

Yeah, it's a darn shame how this pesky Internet (and this thread in particular) force their way onto your screen against your will.

You make absolutely no sense. :uhoh3:

And finally found the "delete thread subscription" button. Now, from here on out, this thread will no longer warrant my attention.

Edited by Glad2baSN

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Mzchas,

Regardless of what some of these well seasoned nurses say I will have to make my own opinions and judgements on what I feel a nurse should do in such a situation one day.

I try to listen to the comments of others and consider them.

You contradict yourself.

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PatMac10,RN has 6 years experience as a ADN, BSN, RN and specializes in Nursing Education, CVICU, Float Pool.

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Thank you for clarifying that you meant no aggression by your post. I need to hear your experiences so I can handle situations in y nursing future.

To fribblet.I'm sorry if yu don't understand what I'm saying, I may not have made myself clear.

I am all for listening to well seasoned nurses comments and experiences no matter how critical of me they are. Now with the newfound information I get from you guys I will have to use it when I consider what actions I will take as a nurse by comparing your experiences and comments. Just because you listen to someone it doesn't mean that their opinion is yours. I will have to develop my future practice off of my opnions and experiences in the future, but with you guys help I can view it from a different perspective.

It's like a previous poster said to me.... "Keep learning".

As far as my comments that were addresses to mchzas I was addressing her on a different point not the actions of the nurse. That's might be why my statements seemed contradictory. I was telling her that the debating on here was a little heated and aggressive on both sides, but I don't let the negative comments of people who I don't know or don't know me effect me to the point where I regret piosting my opinionN because it most certainly does not. I don't try to bebig and bad, but what kind of nurse would I be if I didn't EFFECTIVELY debate or question things that I disagreed with or questioned?

Hope I cleared things up for you. :)

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kanzi monkey has 5 years experience.

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If I spoke to every ignorant or morally twisted person that came through my cashier line like that nurse did i would be fired.(And probably in the ER myself b/c many people take offense easily where I'm from and fighting is very common) My mother who has been a registered nurse over half of my life agrees that her behavior was unethical. I certainly hope you don't or didn't talk to your patients like that.

Hi PatMac :) just want to point out that there is a HUGE difference between customer service and nursing. Sure, when things are going smoothly, ideally the two shall blend like a yummy cappucino. But you've got to know when it is, in fact, INAPPROPRIATE to coddle a patient like a customer.

That kid--a young guy who is probably in college somewhere (he was very concerned about his exam) had been nearly choking on his own vomit from drinking. He has done this before. He may be an alcoholic, for which there is treatment that can be given smoothly, professionally, and compassionately. But not at that moment. That nurse did exactly the right thing--she didn't HAVE to get emotional about it, but what do you think he's going to remember more? A nurse that puts up a professional barrier and cares for the drunk kid, pretending he's just like any other sick patient in the ER--or a nurse that looks into his face and tells him, in so many words, that he's an idiot?

There is tact, and there is getting your point across. In nursing if you have to choose between the two, the latter is always the priority.

Thanks for keeping it real Amanda :yeah:

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PatMac10,RN has 6 years experience as a ADN, BSN, RN and specializes in Nursing Education, CVICU, Float Pool.

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I am very much aware that nursing and customer service are not even remotely alike. I mentioned it in reference to a poster who was saying its ok to talk to someone like that even though they are "repeat offenders"and are ignorant acting, fact is you shoudn't, but some see it fit to do so. It's however you make it.

Amanda, don't ever come and treat/ talk to me like you did that patient. You don't know my history and I don't know yours amd don't wish too. Also from this weeks episodeand the previews for next week, I suggest you grow up. Thanks, other than that your awesome.

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NeoPediRN has 6 years experience and specializes in Pediatrics, ER.

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I am very much aware that nursing and customer service are not even remotely alike. I mentioned it in reference to a poster who was saying its ok to talk to someone like that even though they are "repeat offenders"and are ignorant acting, fact is you shoudn't, but some see it fit to do so. It's however you make it.

Amanda, don't ever come and treat/ talk to me like you did that patient. You don't know my history and I don't know yours amd don't wish too. Also from this weeks episodeand the previews for next week, I suggest you grow up. Thanks, other than that your awesome.

She needs to grow up because she knows how to have fun and loves her job? She can obviously run a code and is clearly respected by her coworkers. She was MGHs ER nurse of the year twice. When you can top those stats please feel free to come back and give us all lessons. Until then you could stand to take one from her and lighten up.

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PatMac10,RN has 6 years experience as a ADN, BSN, RN and specializes in Nursing Education, CVICU, Float Pool.

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First I don't teach those who don't wish to be taught. I'm not here to teach anyone I'm here to give my opinion and read yours. So if you would like to get back to the show, which is the subject of this thread.I will take that back about her growing up. Nursing is a stressful job and you do need to make it as enjoyable as possible. I was wrong about that part. I am glad that nurses were and are still being featured on this show. :)

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Re: ER nurse amanda talking to the resident:

It wasnt what she said, it was the WAY she said it.... with a lot of attitude and a superiority complex in her voice. Her body language and tone was atrocious.

The proper way to address this would be as follows:

Nurse: "Dr X, I noticed you ordered 1mg haldol for our patient. Can we give her a larger dose? It comes in 5mg/1mL and the standard dosing range for haldol for agitation is 2-10mg IV or PO. We usually use at least 2mg."

Its totally nonconfrontational and a much better way to handle the situation. Now if the doc refuses or gets an attitude, then by all means go over his head or tell him that he's wrong or whatever. But that should be a SECONDARY response, not the primary one. There's no need to be rude when you dont have to. Rudeness should be saved for situations that are A) life threatening or pose a serious risk to the patient's health; B) after repeated attempts to be nice have failed.

The situation shown on TV with the resident ordering 1mg of haldol instead of 2.5mg falls into neither of those categories.

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