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Those who can't...teach...your thoughts?

Posted

Has 19 years experience.

I have heard this quote:

"Those who can't, teach..."

Do you believe this?

otessa

Yes and no. Most of my Prof I believe could not be a floor Nurse today just because of their age...well they could but would most likely die after the first couple of 12hr shifts. Now that being said all of my Profs were hardcore Nurses with long and very impressive histories. I bow down to their massive knowledge and skill banks.

sethmctenn

Specializes in Holistic and Aesthetic Medicine.

not at all true with my professors (well maybe one)

The majority of mine came across as knowledgeable and skilled, capable of working the floor. One was a mental case that needed to be nowhere near patients and should never have been in the classroom. I wondered how it was that the administration allowed her access to students.

Gee . . . I hope not. I am working on my MSN so I be a Nurse Educator and I am working full time while I go.

:specs:

Tait, MSN, RN

Specializes in Acute Care Cardiac, Education, Prof Practice. Has 13 years experience.

In order to teach, you have to have been able to do. This is how I feel about nursing at least.

Tait

I would be more inclined to believe that a significant percentage of nurses who have steered their career in the direction of teaching instead of working the floor have done so as a result of becoming burnt out with the patient load, politics of the floor and the emotional stress of caring for the ill and their families.............

MedSurgeMess

Specializes in Med/Surg, ICU, educator.

I had thought about going for NP, but people I work with said that I was such an excellent teacher, have a lot of patience, awesome clinical skills, time management, the whole 9 yards. I never realized anyone saw me that way. I talked to a clinical instructor friend and she helped me get my foot in the door at the local CC, and I teach clinicals now--love it. I recently learned that I'm pretty popular with students because I am low stress, patient and ready to help with skills. I never really knew that I could do this, but I truly love it.

HeartsOpenWide, RN

Specializes in Ante-Intra-Postpartum, Post Gyne.

I do not believe that is true all the time. I had instructors that were still floor nurses and most of my instructors that were no longer floor nurses had a list of experience out the door.

HeartsOpenWide, RN

Specializes in Ante-Intra-Postpartum, Post Gyne.

I had thought about going for NP, but people I work with said that I was such an excellent teacher, have a lot of patience, awesome clinical skills, time management, the whole 9 yards. I never realized anyone saw me that way. I talked to a clinical instructor friend and she helped me get my foot in the door at the local CC, and I teach clinicals now--love it. I recently learned that I'm pretty popular with students because I am low stress, patient and ready to help with skills. I never really knew that I could do this, but I truly love it.

Those sound like excellent skills for an NP, especially the teaching. I am a new nurse and I work in L&D. I never realized how much teaching nursing involves; its definitely a skill I am improving on. ANPs need even more skills with teaching!. I use to work for an FNP who believed highly in educating his patients. Its one of the things that made his patients loyal.

MedSurgeMess

Specializes in Med/Surg, ICU, educator.

Those sound like excellent skills for an NP, especially the teaching. I am a new nurse and I work in L&D. I never realized how much teaching nursing involves; its definitely a skill I am improving on. ANPs need even more skills with teaching!. I use to work for an FNP who believed highly in educating his patients. Its one of the things that made his patients loyal.

I'm thinking on going back after the MSN to get a post masters FNP, just to leave my options in a better situation. Anyone have any thoughts on that?

You need to stay at hospital to precept new GNs!!!:bowingpur

MedSurgeMess

Specializes in Med/Surg, ICU, educator.

You need to stay at hospital to precept new GNs!!!:bowingpur

I do that now....and yes, I get great reviews for that too. I never really knew I had it in me!

That is a completely bogus phrase. Teaching, like nursing, is a skill and a profession in its own right.

Two of the best professors I have ever had were in Psychology and Chemistry. Either of these two people either could have been or already were quite successful in their specialty. They chose to teach because of the satisfaction it gives them and because they are just damn good at it. I remember writing an eval of my Chemistry teacher that said, "Watching her teach is like watching Tiger Woods hit a golf ball." She was that good.

Conversely, I have seen some professors who were probably very good at what they did, but were fairly lousy at helping students assimilate new concepts. New professors often have some growing pains in this area.

Some of my nursing school instructors are great in lab and clinical settings, but are poor theory lecturers. One of these days, I am going to sit through one too many professors reading directly off a powerpoint in front of class and snap: "HEY LADY!!! I CAN FREAKING READ!! I NEED YOU TO TEACH, NOT READ TO ME!!"

I find myself doing quite a bit of tutoring because a professor so badly mangled their presentation of the material.

ivanh3

Specializes in ER and family advanced nursing practice.

the version i heard went like so:

those who can't do...manage...those who can't manage...teach...those who can't teach...instruct phys ed classes…

in all seriousness it is probably just as much (or more?) about passion as it is ability. we go were our passions take us (hopefully). often, people decide that it is time for change and look for something new. teaching is an important skill. we don't all have it. i have seen some excellent providers who had students dumped on them. turns out being clinically skillful does not ensure being able get the notion across to others. again, often an issue of desire.

just a thought.

ivan

mamamerlee, LPN

Specializes in home health, dialysis, others. Has 35 years experience.

Almost all nurses make good teachers to some extent - we are teaching all the time, to everyone around us. Meds, procedures, disease processes. Formal, and informal. The best teachers incite a flame in the student, a desire to learn even more, and hopefully, to pass it on.

That being said, I agree with DannyC12. Do not read to me in a classroom setting. If you assigned reading to me, and I have done it, I want to know more.

Sewbusy~RN

Specializes in Orthopedics.

I think it is the exception to find a teacher that wouldn't have been a good floor nurse at some point. When I was in school most of my teachers were people I looked up to and respected a great deal. I remember frustrations with certain teachers and thinking at the time that they were probably terrible nurses. But looking back, I realize that it was me that wasn't really up to par, not them.