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The Men in OB Debate: Help!

Nurses   (5,392 Views | 46 Replies)
by jay_prn jay_prn (New) New

jay_prn has 1 years experience .

282 Profile Views; 3 Posts

You are reading page 4 of The Men in OB Debate: Help!. If you want to start from the beginning Go to First Page.

5 Posts; 183 Profile Views

Like I said. This is not my personal opinion. And not a good excuse. But an excuse I have been given. One of the most highly regarded people in the field of BF is JACK Newman, lol. I have had several male students who were great in L&D and Postpartum. And really the best fit for someone wanting to do OB is to start postpartum. But unless you go to a large teaching hospital in a less conservative area, the chances of being a male nurse hired onto OB are slimmer. I would say though, the OP appears to have gotten a thumbs up from a manager in that area, so he must be in a good place for it. I'd say go for it!

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klone has 14 years experience as a MSN, RN and specializes in Women's Health/OB Leadership.

4 Followers; 13,499 Posts; 117,308 Profile Views

But unless you go to a large teaching hospital in a less conservative area, the chances of being a male nurse hired onto OB are slimmer.

I disagree.

A lot of what you've said in your posts seem to be pure conjecture.

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labordude has 14 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in L&D, OBED, NICU, Lactation.

467 Posts; 12,118 Profile Views

But unless you go to a large teaching hospital in a less conservative area, the chances of being a male nurse hired onto OB are slimmer.

I also disagree. I'll say from my experience that the teaching hospitals ignored me and the community facilities jumped on me when I wanted to switch. I also had a director at the flagship teaching hospital in a major metro tell me they wouldn't hire guys because the physicians wouldn't like it. Had a nice meeting with their CNO, CEO, and VP of HR after that one. Mileage will always vary, but you are correct that if he has a thumbs up from a hiring

Manager he should get the experience. Once you have that it's much harder to get weeded out during hiring because good, experienced L&D nurses are worth their weight in gold in some cities.

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3ringnursing has 25 years experience as a BSN and specializes in ICU; Telephone Triage Nurse.

1 Article; 543 Posts; 8,924 Profile Views

I think with the passion you have, why work any where else?

Best of luck - and welcome to nursing.

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23 Posts; 1,070 Profile Views

Go for it!!!!

Many women choose male ob/gyn's - for many years most ob/gyn's were men.

There will of course be some patients who don't want a male nurse for personal or cultural reasons, but I believe most ppl in the present age do not mind a male nurse.

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liathA has 1 years experience.

14 Posts; 470 Profile Views

I've actually found that in a lot of cases working in a women's-health space can make men into stronger providers - I actually usually prefer a male OBGYN, for instance, because I've yet to meet one that didn't have an excellent bedside manner and a real talent for putting their patients at ease, while I've had several negative experiences with female women's health providers. It's also been my experience that diversity strengthens a workplace. I say go for it - I'd much rather have healthcare providers that are passionate about their specialties than ones that just happen to match my gender.

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19 Posts; 790 Profile Views

Your passion will shine through! Best wishes to you, and as you grow in your career, NP might be a possibility, you never know! Women choose male OB GYN physicians, I'm sure working with a male nurse would be the same! Have fun!

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1 Article; 444 Posts; 9,302 Profile Views

I say go for it! I chose a male provider for my double mastectomy as well as my reconstruction. They were very caring and sensitive to my needs and desires. I had interviewed several providers and just loved these two!!

I have no problems with male providers in specialties that serve women.

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jena5111 has 5 years experience as a ADN, ASN, RN and specializes in Tele, Interventional Pain Management, OR.

1 Article; 174 Posts; 7,309 Profile Views

Why is it such a big deal for a male to be an OB nurse, but not an OB/GYN (MD)?

I gave birth to my first child in March 2017. The on-call OB/GYN was male--the BEST doctor I could have had during a natural birth. He was phenomenal.

All my nurses happened to be female. But I would not have noticed or cared about gender so long as my nurses were competent/knowledgeable (my nurses were amazing).

A good LD nurse should have experienced labor/delivery as much as a good cardiac nurse should have experienced MI or CHF.

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1 Post; 76 Profile Views

Speaking as someone who had two babies, one of whom was delivered by a man. I couldn't possibly have cared who did it, so long as they knew what they were doing. My first baby, was a giant undiagnosed GD baby (9 1/2 pounder) and very stuck. 69 hour labour. The MW who finally delivered her was a man, and I must have had 20 odd shifts of nurses over the time, and hes the only one I remembered. Did a great job. Do a job you're passionate about!

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67 Posts; 1,598 Profile Views

I'm not reading any of the previous replies and am going with my first impressions. Those people complaining about you being a male and "harming" OB patients are probably snowflakes. In my OB rotation, which was also great, the women didn't give two cow farts if I was a man. They wanted to get their baby out and start loving it. The only people that brought up anything about my sex were family members. I helped in the delivery of 2 babies on my rotation. One of the mothers of the patient said she didn't think it was appropriate that I was assisting the OB physician because I was a man. The patient said she didn't care and had given permission for me to be there.

The people claiming women need more safe spaces, that you can't connect because you're a man, and that you'll bring up rape memories probably subscribe to the current narrative being pushed. They also probably feel like you shouldn't have been a nurse in the first place because of your male privilege and you're probably paid more than all your female counterparts. You have a sack man, use it and be the best damn OB nurse you can!

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