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The Men in OB Debate: Help!

Nurses   (5,424 Views | 46 Replies)
by jay_prn jay_prn (New) New

jay_prn has 1 years experience .

287 Profile Views; 3 Posts

You are reading page 3 of The Men in OB Debate: Help!. If you want to start from the beginning Go to First Page.

Reyn04 has 7 years experience as a MSN, RN and specializes in Critical Care.

41 Posts; 695 Profile Views

If you're good at it & you love it, I say go for it. As with any other nursing you will respect the patient's wishes so, if a patient is uncomfortable with a male nurse I'm sure wherever you work will find a way to reassign that patient. Clearly its not an issue for the manager of that department.

As for a "uniquely female" experience you cant relate to - I have issue with that. I guarantee you I have not experienced most of the many diagnoses of the patients I've cared for over the years, that doesnt diminish my ability to be their nurse. There are plenty of OB-GYN MDs PAs NPs etc that would likely also take issue with such a sexist view of the male caregiver. If these were other nurses that made such comments they should get with the times. If these were "regular" people I'd take it with a grain of salt.

You will run into many other people's opinions in life & far too many will tell you what THEY think you should do, how you should live, where you should live. What matters is what makes YOU happy. Be good natured but seriously, let you do you. Finding what you love in nursing is a gift, I wouldn't let that go.

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382 Posts; 13,907 Profile Views

If it was your favorite rotation and you feel that passionate about it, I say GO FOR IT! I've had patients (not OB) who sometimes refuse male nurses, so it is definitely not limited to the specialty but to the individual beliefs. Other than an OB nurse that has gone through childbirth and can maybe relate, you are in the same group as female nurses that have never given birth. Let's face it, you may have some tough days, but I think you will soon realize it is still worth it. Good luck!

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1 Post; 85 Profile Views

I'm a labor and delivery nurse :) I definitely think you should go for it if you are passionate about it! I don't have an inherent issue with it. Some of the best nurses I know are men so I have no doubt you could be great!

I will say this... I know lots of people say "there are male OBGYNs, so what's the difference?!" I think that's a little different than having a male labor nurse. You spend a lot more time with the patient. You help them with breast feeding. You are doing lots of peri care, etc. they definitely are more vulnerable with their nurse that MD. Plenty of women would be fine with a man in that role but I would think many would not. It might feel too intimate...I also think lots of husbands would feel a little awkward about it too. I don't think it has to do with you "not being able to relate". I just think it's more intimate than a lot of other types of nursing. When I worked in medsurg, my male patients were only exposed on occasion if I had to cath them, etc. but my day didn't revolve around that area. In L&D my patients are much more exposed regularly and so it naturally is just more uncomfortable for them.

Don't think you should rule it out...I think you absolutely should give it a try... I'm just being honest in how I think a decent amount of patients would feel!

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greenerpastures has 5 years experience.

190 Posts; 5,865 Profile Views

Go for it! I think it's great. Women have male OBGYN docs all the time, so why is a nurse being male always made into a big deal? I've never understood that part of it. If you are a good nurse, I don't care if you are male or female.

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1 Post; 82 Profile Views

I use to teach electronic fetal monitoring and had male OB nurses, they always said that they never had a problem with any patient not wanting a male nurse. The patients were more interested in having a good nurse. As long as this is your passion go for it.

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Creamsoda is a ASN, RN and specializes in ICU.

724 Posts; 12,293 Profile Views

I really hope you don't listen to the naysayers about this. especially as we become more "modernized/progressive", I really don't think its an issue. Yes you will encounter patients who refuse you as a nurse but I do not think that will be the norm. Many of their OB's are men! You sound like you really love this field. And why not, men are half of the parents too. Im a 34 year old woman. Babies scare me to death. Im sure your a natural at caring for women and the babies. I as a woman am not! hahaha!. Although my husband seems to be more in tune with the whole baby things. I really think that most women will be OK with you.

Obviously there are the religious population, and sure there are some women who would be uncomfortable, but if that manager wants to interview you, DO IT.

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17 Posts; 611 Profile Views

While the overwhelming majority of responses were positive, there were those who professed a strong and passionate objection to men in the OB field. That childbirth is a uniquely female experience, and men can never relate to their patient as closely as a woman nurse can, was one reason given.

I'm a female, have no children and don't plan on having children. This argument is pretty lame. I won't be able to relate to the patient at all even as a female nurse. Not even that, but if I worked in a cardiac unit, I have no history to relate to the patients, and again, can't relate as well. Just because I can't relate to a patient doesn't mean their care will be any different.

I say GO FOR IT! I really wouldn't care about the gender of my nurse as long as they give me great care.

You have already stated that you don't take people who refuse you for being a male CNA personally, which I'm sure you may experience in this field. Anyway, if you love the work and are passionate about it, I say there's nothing stopping you. Best of luck.

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11 Posts; 540 Profile Views

  • I have had multiple men as OB/GYN's. My best friend in high school was a man and I think if you are good at it you will be doing the field of nursing a disservice by NOT following the path you love! There will always be areas where we as nurses have to tread lightly (as you mentioned a woman who has traumatic memories) but that should not decide your career path. I say go for it, and congrats on becoming an RN! Find a field you love and make your career meaningful!! Best wishes!

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11 Posts; 540 Profile Views

Quote from Emilyjoy726

I'm a labor and delivery nurse la9MFCKoIaKIlaHjVuttgx238A8l+oISTPknrAAAAAElFTkSuQmCC I definitely think you should go for it if you are passionate about it! I don't have an inherent issue with it. Some of the best nurses I know are men so I have no doubt you could be great!”

Very well thought out and logical statement. I too thought a male OB would be similar, but you are correct the nurse is a lot more involved in intimate ways. That being said, the world is growing and changing and if I had to choose between a female or male I would be more concerned with their abilities in the field and their concern for me and my family. Not everyone will agree and that is their right but that should not keep a person from giving it a try. I think your advice is right on target!!

Edited by Howej1
Inserted quote

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Orion81RN has 7 years experience.

908 Posts; 9,452 Profile Views

I survived my OB/GYN clinical rotation only because the instructor was one of the rare ones that had empathy for a guy like me, a fish out of water in this area. The book work and passing exams was always easy for me, but only one woman consented to watch her give birth. The rest all refused consent. That and I got to see a C section. You are an exception. They really ought to give the guys a choice between OB/GYN or an extra med surg or psych rotation, giving us the option of foregoing the OB/GYN rotation with the agreement that could even go on our licenses that we will never work in that capacity. I have great admiration for the OB/GYN folks and those who bring life into the world, just not my cup of tea, if you will. I do have a great deal of sympathy for the brave women who go through childbirth, I was wincing for the young lady that seemed to scream forever as she gave birth to a 10 lb baby. I don't know how women do that, but not something that fits me and most other male nurses I know

It is still important to take OB/maturnity nursing, regardless of if you ever go in that field. My rationale being pregnant women have comorbitities where you will still find yourself caring for pregant women outside the maternity units.

An expecting mother breaks a bone for example and needs a stay in post acute rehab. Purpose for being there: recovery/therapy....BUT you still need knowledge of OB to best care for her.

Say you are an ED nurse and you have a pregnant patient in the ED for unrelated reasons to her pregnancy. You still need to know how to care for the pregnant woman. I could go on and on with examples, but I think I've made my point clear.

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5 Posts; 185 Profile Views

I think the likelihood is greater in newborn nursery or NICU than in L&D or Postpartum. We had a male LPN/Scrub/Doula in our L&D and he was well received but I would say that is definitely an outlier. What I have been told (be it a poor excuse or not) is that those units are unlikely to hire a male NURSE because nurses are required to assist with breastfeeding, yes, even in a hospital with lactation. The impression is that male nurses would not be well suited for this. That is not my personal opinion. I've had several male students who were wonderful in postpartum and L&D. I think if you truly wanted to work in OB, trying the newborn nursery might be a good start and segway into other areas. Also, working at a large teaching hospital you would probably have a better chance than a small, private hospital.

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labordude has 14 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in L&D, OBED, NICU, Lactation.

472 Posts; 12,236 Profile Views

I think the likelihood is greater in newborn nursery or NICU than in L&D or Postpartum. We had a male LPN/Scrub/Doula in our L&D and he was well received but I would say that is definitely an outlier. What I have been told (be it a poor excuse or not) is that those units are unlikely to hire a male NURSE because nurses are required to assist with breastfeeding, yes, even in a hospital with lactation. The impression is that male nurses would not be well suited for this. That is not my personal opinion. I've had several male students who were wonderful in postpartum and L&D. I think if you truly wanted to work in OB, trying the newborn nursery might be a good start and segway into other areas. Also, working at a large teaching hospital you would probably have a better chance than a small, private hospital.

THIS is their answer? As opposed to a nursery nurse or NICU nurse who might just do less breastfeeding support... What the heck would they think of me being a CLC? Dang, I'd just blow their outdated, stereotypical, and not supported by actual research thought processes. I'm actually quite well suited for my job, despite not being able to really breastfeed or be pregnant, though if those are qualifications, I feel bad for those who work in oncology.

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