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jena5111

jena5111 ASN, RN

Tele, Interventional Pain Management, OR
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jena5111 has 6 years experience as a ASN, RN and specializes in Tele, Interventional Pain Management, OR.

I love being an RN!

jena5111's Latest Activity

  1. Thank you for your comment. My post on this thread was deleted/removed (and I received a stern warning from a moderator) because I called directly called this particular poster a t****. I joined All Nurses back in July 2010 when embarking upon my nursing prerequisites was a gleam in my eye. Now I've been an RN for 4.5 years. No one reviewing my 10-year post history on this site would come to the conclusion that I'm motivated to insult others. Yet I had a post removed for the first time ever when this relatively new member of like 4 months has been spewing misinformation over this forum. Disappointing. And yes--vote in November. Very little changes or improves unless responsible, informed citizens hold themselves accountable and cast their votes.
  2. jena5111

    Covid-19: The Guilt of the Work From Home Nurse

    As a neurosurgery clinic nurse, I (intermittently) feel that same guilt for not being on the front lines. I don't delude myself for one second that my currently work-from-home butt, who sees a few in-person fresh post-ops one day weekly in clinic for suture/staple removal, is a hero nurse. And yet, the multiple patients I talk to from home daily, on the phone or through the electronic portal, need my nursing care. Although elective neurosurgery cases at my affiliated hospital have been canceled/postponed for weeks, we still regularly post urgent/emergent cases as we are a Level II trauma center. Even COVID-19 can't keep people from having strokes, falling and developing subdural hematomas, sustaining spinal fractures in accidents, etc. When patients and their families find themselves on the other side of neurosurgery, they often need a nurse to guide them through what comes next. I am proud to provide that support. I left acute care nearly 4 years ago after becoming pregnant with my son. I sought out ambulatory care to reduce risk to my child since I was an older first-time mom. Along the way, I think I found my niche in ambulatory care. My point is that ALL nurses have value. We are all REAL nurses. I have everything I need to do my job safely. I am fortunate. Yes, I may be adjusting to work from home (WFH) with a three-year-old used to full-time school whose school has been closed for a month. At least I get to be with my son. My fellow nurse colleagues actually on the COVID-19 frontlines do not have what they need. They did not "sign up for this". These nurses signed up to care for patients assuming they had everything they needed to do their jobs safely. Some of them have to quarantine away from their families or send their children away to keep them safe. I am fortunate.
  3. jena5111

    Admin/Clerical Staff in Scrubs, Observing Procedures

    Totally agree. If there's some legit/above-board arrangement I'm not privy to, then cool--I am done talking about it and won't bring it up again. I don't care about getting this specific person in trouble. I want to make sure patient privacy is respected. That's it.
  4. jena5111

    Admin/Clerical Staff in Scrubs, Observing Procedures

    I hear you, but a surgery scheduler/clerk who schedules elective cases in the OR should not need to witness in-office procedures to do his/her job better.
  5. jena5111

    Admin/Clerical Staff in Scrubs, Observing Procedures

    I don't know tons of specifics. It sounds like a combination of a "life happens" story (husband and kids) combined with difficulty passing entrance exams. Regardless, a surgery scheduler/clerk, who arranges elective surgeries in the OR, doesn't need to witness in-office procedures to do his or her job better. I read a few comments on this thread suggesting that it's a learning/job enrichment experience. I get that perspective, but I disagree. I would sort of understand OR observation time, which requires extensive vetting by the hospital, over the in-office stuff. Seems like the in-office observations happen under the radar because of a couple of nurses who allow it due to their team's longstanding working relationship. I don't have firsthand proof but I think this person is present and wearing scrubs and patients don't know to question it.
  6. jena5111

    Admin/Clerical Staff in Scrubs, Observing Procedures

    I really appreciate the responses and perspective here. I don't care about trying to get anyone into trouble, but I want to make sure rules around patient privacy are being followed. I hear what a couple of you said about shadowing being relatively commonplace these days. However, this situation stands out to me because I've worked in this setting for two years and I've never noticed clerical/admin staff observing procedures (not that I've ever gone out of my way to look, either...) The best course of action is likely to place an anonymous call to the compliance line--something I've never done, but I guess this type of situation is one reason why such a line exists. I will probably just make the call and let the situation go. Again, thanks to everyone who took the time to read and respond.
  7. I'm an RN in a hospital-based surgery clinic. Other hospital-based surgical specialties share our suite and hold clinic as well. Across our outpatient organization, there is a black-and-white policy that only clinical staff wear scrubs. However, a surgery scheduler for another specialty has begun showing up to work in scrubs for the past couple of weeks. That in and of itself is not a major deal to me as surgery schedulers are not typically patient-facing--their patient contact tends to happen over the phone. However, I have twice in the past week randomly overheard this scheduler asking to observe nurse visits with minor procedures, and the nurses allow it. These nurses and the scheduler have worked together for years and exhibit a very close-knit dynamic. To complicate matters, their manager works at another clinic site; the manager of my suite is not technically their manager. My concern is that this admin/clerical staff represents herself to patients as clinical. I doubt she straight-up says she's clinical, but she's in the room during procedures and the scrubs give the impression that her presence is somehow relevant. I do not like the idea of patients being an exhibit for someone who has mentioned to me more than once that she wants to be a nurse but for whatever reason it hasn't happened. Patients do not exist to be our personal learning experiences--whether we're clinical staff or not. It's one thing if we're a teaching facility and/or the patient has signed a form indicating they're okay with observers. That's not the case here. Should I do anything? I am the last person to be a tattletale in ANY situation, or contribute to selling the drama in our already drama-filled ambulatory setting. My philosophy is to fight the important battles (exceedingly few and far between) and to fly below management's radar while being the best nurse I can be the rest of the time. Should I just let it lie?
  8. jena5111

    Need advise regarding uncomfortable, disrespectful situation

    Yes, the OR circulator is supposed to do a separate/independent pre-op interview/assessment to include meds, allergies, implants, previous anesthesia experiences, understanding of procedure to be performed (site/side), and etc before wheeling the patient back to the OR. It is a standardized interview with preset questions. The OR circulator's interview must occur PRIOR to sedation. I would even jokingly mention to the patient my awareness that they've been asked these questions like three times before...it's a surgical safety issue. I can count on zero hands how many times patients cared about answering the same questions multiple times. Many would notice and mention the redundancy but most appreciated the attention to safety and detail.
  9. jena5111

    Year of the Nurse - What is Your Nursolution?

    Sale of essential oils as a "side hustle"...are you promoting MLMs? Not a good look for nurses.
  10. jena5111

    I Was Fired...for Being Abrasive and Having Attitude

    THIS! I came here to say this. Lack of filter and/or having a "big personality" does not help someone become a competent nurse. Especially as a new grad without a solid nursing knowledge base. OP and those with similar thinking--keep the big personality and lack of filter to yourself so you can have therapeutic nurse-patient relationships.
  11. jena5111

    Why do I always look high at work?

    I agree with the recommendation to see another eye doctor. In the meantime, have you tried Lumify eyedrops? They are a bit pricey (around $20 for 2 mL) but pretty widely available and, for me, quite effective at knocking out redness. Good luck!
  12. Same here! My ADN program started in mid-January and we had our first clinical day in the third week of February. Our "real" first clinical day would have taken place the week prior, but for a "snow day" (pretty absurd in Austin, TX but any trace of ice on the roads here is considered snow). I was so disappointed!!
  13. jena5111

    Hot Cheetos are a public health menace

    **Replying to Beats BSN** The onus isn't on people to treat healthcare better...healthcare should treat people better. And the idea that "how some people say, children in America are starving." No, not every American child is starving, but food insecurity among US children is a legitimate issue. It's absurd in a country with so much food/resource waste, for sure, but it's still an issue. The US is a wealthy country, but that wealth is NOT evenly distributed. Long-term economic lessons are well and good, but many people and families need more immediate intervention. I understand the ED nursing staff bears a formidable plight, but at least they get to go home when their shifts are over (and presumably do not have to worry about procuring their next meal).
  14. jena5111

    Hot Cheetos are a public health menace

    The onus isn't on people to treat healthcare better...healthcare should treat people better. And the idea that "how some people say, children in America are starving." No, not every American child is starving, but food insecurity among US children is a legitimate issue. It's absurd in a country with so much food/resource waste, for sure, but it's still an issue. Long-term economic lessons are well and good, but many people and families need more immediate intervention. I understand the ED nursing staff bears a formidable plight, but at least they get to go home when their shifts are over (and presumably do not have to worry about procuring their next meal).
  15. jena5111

    New nurse staying way past 9:30 pm on day shift

    DO NOT pull meds for all pts at the beginning of your shift. You significantly increase your risk for med errors by doing so. A pt's MAR is a dynamic thing that can change with meds added/DC'd at any time. Also may be easy to mix up meds and pts. The scanning system is great but imperfect. Don't rely on it to be your nurse brain. Most importantly...you are not there just to push meds. ASSESSMENT is the most important function of a nurse in any care setting. Is the pt better, worse, or the same? Ask that question for every body system as you complete your head-to-toe assessment. Hold that question in your mind each time you enter that pt's room.
  16. jena5111

    Should I ask for a raise?

    Strident insistence that one SHOULD NOT DISCUSS SALARIES is a common strategy employed by management to depress wages overall and increase $$$ for the uppermost echelon. This happens across many industries; not just in nursing. The only way out is for nurses/workers to actually discuss salaries (which is NOT inherently unprofessional, as long as information is readily volunteered). If you, OP, know for a fact that inexperienced new hires make your same wage, you should question that. Unfortunately, as another poster stated, your best bet at a raise will most likely be to jump ship for a competing employer. That's just a strange reality of nursing. Good luck, and I hope you find what you're looking for.