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jena5111

jena5111 ADN, ASN, RN

Tele, Interventional Pain Management, OR
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jena5111 has 5 years experience as a ADN, ASN, RN and specializes in Tele, Interventional Pain Management, OR.

I love being an RN!

jena5111's Latest Activity

  1. jena5111

    Need advise regarding uncomfortable, disrespectful situation

    THIS. In my brief time as an RN circulator, I took my (abbreviated) pre-op interview seriously. That was most definitely time to catch details that had fallen through the cracks--which didn't happen often, but happened often enough to make me realize the value of my interview with the patient. Moreover, that short time was my opportunity to establish a rapport with the patient BEFORE fentanyl. Introductions and role explanations from all peri/intra-operative team members are important. The patient needs to understand that an entire care team exists during surgery to keep him/her safe. The circulator should reinforce and establish the patient's trust. I had an OR charge nurse yelling the 2 or 3 minutes late I would be wheeling the patient back WHILE wheeling the (luckily fentanyl-ed) patient back. "Jena5111, do you know it's 0733??!!" Super unprofessional and dramatic. Please note that this was not a consistent occurrence on my part. I understand the rationale for on-time case starts. However, the hair-on-fire mentality around case start TIME (among other things) made me realize that I prefer awake patients. I found my way to a hospital-based surgery clinic and I love my job. Well, the nurse part of it. The admin part that happens in so many outpatient settings...not so much.
  2. I'm an RN in a hospital-based surgery clinic. Other hospital-based surgical specialties share our suite and hold clinic as well. Across our outpatient organization, there is a black-and-white policy that only clinical staff wear scrubs. However, a surgery scheduler for another specialty has begun showing up to work in scrubs for the past couple of weeks. That in and of itself is not a major deal to me as surgery schedulers are not typically patient-facing--their patient contact tends to happen over the phone. However, I have twice in the past week randomly overheard this scheduler asking to observe nurse visits with minor procedures, and the nurses allow it. These nurses and the scheduler have worked together for years and exhibit a very close-knit dynamic. To complicate matters, their manager works at another clinic site; the manager of my suite is not technically their manager. My concern is that this admin/clerical staff represents herself to patients as clinical. I doubt she straight-up says she's clinical, but she's in the room during procedures and the scrubs give the impression that her presence is somehow relevant. I do not like the idea of patients being an exhibit for someone who has mentioned to me more than once that she wants to be a nurse but for whatever reason it hasn't happened. Patients do not exist to be our personal learning experiences--whether we're clinical staff or not. It's one thing if we're a teaching facility and/or the patient has signed a form indicating they're okay with observers. That's not the case here. Should I do anything? I am the last person to be a tattletale in ANY situation, or contribute to selling the drama in our already drama-filled ambulatory setting. My philosophy is to fight the important battles (exceedingly few and far between) and to fly below management's radar while being the best nurse I can be the rest of the time. Should I just let it lie?
  3. jena5111

    I Was Fired...for Being Abrasive and Having Attitude

    THIS! I came here to say this. Lack of filter and/or having a "big personality" does not help someone become a competent nurse. Especially as a new grad without a solid nursing knowledge base. OP and those with similar thinking--keep the big personality and lack of filter to yourself so you can have therapeutic nurse-patient relationships.
  4. jena5111

    Why do I always look high at work?

    I agree with the recommendation to see another eye doctor. In the meantime, have you tried Lumify eyedrops? They are a bit pricey (around $20 for 2 mL) but pretty widely available and, for me, quite effective at knocking out redness. Good luck!
  5. jena5111

    Taking a sleep aid when on call?

    Ehhhh... a sleep aid while on call. I'd say no. But then I'm the person who lapses into a semi-comatose state after a 3 mg melatonin, so...
  6. jena5111

    RN's are you happy with your career, why or why not?

    Agree that the pressure to pursue "higher education" in nursing when one already has a bachelor's degree can feel ridiculous. Like...my documentation is on point because of the degrees I already have. My reasoning skills are on point because of the same. I have a BA in English along with my associates in nursing. But I'm starting an RN-MSN bridge on 12/01 so I can open more doors for this second career I started three years ago. Agree that I would want to learn additional patho and pharm on my own without a specific degree plan.
  7. jena5111

    Accused of not giving dilaudid

    When/where I worked on the floor, Dilaudid came in 2 mg/mL syringe. So wasting was pretty much ALWAYS required (sigh). And wasting required a witness, whose credentials were typed into the Pyxis along with my own. OP, did anyone SEE you waste that last bit of Dilaudid? I'm not suggesting you didn't but this whole thing may be a crazy uphill battle without a witness. And...you've learned a lesson here about caring for folks that you know. Don't! You never know what strange dynamics will emerge in that situation. Good luck, OP!
  8. jena5111

    Turnover Times

    The level of emphasis on OR turnover time is absurd. It places undue stress on all OR staff and contributes to incivility among said staff. I circulated in a level 1 trauma center and encountered far more "hair-on-fire" turnover shenanigans from charge nurses and the OR NM than any surgeon. If anything, I noticed surgeons complimenting OR staff when they had to follow-to follow-to follow cases (not identical setups depending on procedure) because, in their perception, we were efficient. As a circulator, I wouldn't beat myself up over feedback from an individual surgeon. Not about turnover time, anyway! Get your charge nurse involved if it continues--that's why s/he makes the big bucks (haha) during charge shifts. Good luck, OP!
  9. jena5111

    Grossed out for the first time this year

    That poor little boy, OP. He can't help the lack of adequate dental care. THAT is what sickens me, beyond whatever came out of his mouth. This is why my 18-month-old son has already been to the dentist TWICE. And we don't give him juice, candy, foods with added sugar, milk overnight (stopped the last pre-bed bottle at age 13 months--and he never ever went to bed with a bottle, ever). His teeth get brushed twice per day despite protests... It's worth the extra time and effort to go for infant/toddler dentist visits. But I think many parents don't have the knowledge about pedi teeth or do not have adequate dental insurance so it doesn't get done. That isn't necessarily their fault.
  10. Same here! My ADN program started in mid-January and we had our first clinical day in the third week of February. Our "real" first clinical day would have taken place the week prior, but for a "snow day" (pretty absurd in Austin, TX but any trace of ice on the roads here is considered snow). I was so disappointed!!
  11. jena5111

    Hot Cheetos are a public health menace

    **Replying to Beats BSN** The onus isn't on people to treat healthcare better...healthcare should treat people better. And the idea that "how some people say, children in America are starving." No, not every American child is starving, but food insecurity among US children is a legitimate issue. It's absurd in a country with so much food/resource waste, for sure, but it's still an issue. The US is a wealthy country, but that wealth is NOT evenly distributed. Long-term economic lessons are well and good, but many people and families need more immediate intervention. I understand the ED nursing staff bears a formidable plight, but at least they get to go home when their shifts are over (and presumably do not have to worry about procuring their next meal).
  12. jena5111

    Hot Cheetos are a public health menace

    The onus isn't on people to treat healthcare better...healthcare should treat people better. And the idea that "how some people say, children in America are starving." No, not every American child is starving, but food insecurity among US children is a legitimate issue. It's absurd in a country with so much food/resource waste, for sure, but it's still an issue. Long-term economic lessons are well and good, but many people and families need more immediate intervention. I understand the ED nursing staff bears a formidable plight, but at least they get to go home when their shifts are over (and presumably do not have to worry about procuring their next meal).
  13. jena5111

    New nurse staying way past 9:30 pm on day shift

    DO NOT pull meds for all pts at the beginning of your shift. You significantly increase your risk for med errors by doing so. A pt's MAR is a dynamic thing that can change with meds added/DC'd at any time. Also may be easy to mix up meds and pts. The scanning system is great but imperfect. Don't rely on it to be your nurse brain. Most importantly...you are not there just to push meds. ASSESSMENT is the most important function of a nurse in any care setting. Is the pt better, worse, or the same? Ask that question for every body system as you complete your head-to-toe assessment. Hold that question in your mind each time you enter that pt's room.
  14. Even if you don't consider your nails a risk for patients, how do you overlook the personal risk? Despite gloves, artificial nails can harbor tons of bacteria over the course of a shift when exposed to the typical patient-care petri dish environment. Yuck. Any nursing position that involves direct patient care should probably require short, natural nails. I get biweekly pedis but only have fingernail polish when I'm on vacay.
  15. jena5111

    Help getting in OR

    Offlabel, while this may not be the advice OP was looking for...you are exactly right, and it's important to know this before transitioning to OR. I personally do NOT love circulating RN's hyper-focus on "procedural orthodoxy and documentation"--thank you, Offlabel, for explaining the circulator role quite concisely. So I recently transitioned (within the same organization) from circulating to working with trauma/general surgeons on the outpatient side. I really enjoy being that pre- and post-op point of contact for my patients, along with the patient education/triage opportunities. And one of the surgeons wants me to scrub eventually. I'll have the best of both worlds from my perspective. OP, you have an awesome foundation for OR circulating if that's your goal. You will have a deeper knowledge of medications and diseases/pathologies than many new OR-only nurses, and this will enhance your patient care. You will know, with a quick glance at the patient's chart, what to bring up with anesthesia (who is REALLY SUPER IN-CHARGE of intra-op patient care). That knowledge can make a huge difference for patient outcomes in surgery. Just understand that circulating is A LOT of running after supplies during the case, herding vendors before the case (implants, intra-op monitoring depending on service line), counting before and during the case, and charging for stuff--at least at my facility, the RN circulator documents all supplies/suture/etc in the picklist for inventory as well as charging purposes. One thing many OR RNs enjoy is the 1:1 ratio, and I understand that completely, having worked on a crazy cardiac tele floor with a 6:1 ratio. Although I would research upcoming surgical patients for the day (and preference cards/case carts) during longer cases because I didn't want to have a bad turnover time...sigh. Hyper-emphasis on room turnover time is another frustration unique to OR. The takeaway...every specialty has its advantages and disadvantages. One of the best parts of nursing is our ability to transition, and find the synergy that works best for us and our patients.
  16. jena5111

    Should I ask for a raise?

    Strident insistence that one SHOULD NOT DISCUSS SALARIES is a common strategy employed by management to depress wages overall and increase $$$ for the uppermost echelon. This happens across many industries; not just in nursing. The only way out is for nurses/workers to actually discuss salaries (which is NOT inherently unprofessional, as long as information is readily volunteered). If you, OP, know for a fact that inexperienced new hires make your same wage, you should question that. Unfortunately, as another poster stated, your best bet at a raise will most likely be to jump ship for a competing employer. That's just a strange reality of nursing. Good luck, and I hope you find what you're looking for.
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