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spoken to at work

Posted

Specializes in cardiac rehab, medical/tele, psychiatric. Has 2 years experience.

am so upset and have no one to vent to. :cry:I've been working at a hospital for 6 months now and we have an interim manager on the floor who can be a bit high strung. The other day I got spoken to from another manager on another floor who is also covering (I have never interacted with her before) and I am fairly certain it is because the interim manager went to her.

The meeting started off by her saying that there were concerns about my practice on the floor and if they were safe. After that I was somewhat speechless. She proceeded with a list of things that happened lord knows when and an incident that just happened. She said she was going to work on a professional development plan for me because I ask too many questions for such a busy floor.

I had a very hard time processing this (they took me off the floor at noon to discuss). I have never been spoken to previously and now that I have had time to process, I am feeling like I was thrown under the bus. Not one thing that was mentioned was unsafe. From the way the meeting went, I think the manager on my floor thinks that my asking questions about certain procedures means that I am not "getting it". I am not sure how to proceed...and I am feeling a bit uneasy about asking any questions of my colleagues and also feel like if someone had an issue, they should have approached me first. I also feel like they were stretching it abit (one of the commments was that I called a doctor for a diet order when there was one..I mean, c'mon..I didn't know I was supposed to be perfect)

I am getting sick just thinking about it.

traumaRUs, MSN, APRN, CNS

Specializes in Nephrology, Cardiology, ER, ICU. Has 27 years experience.

I would ask for a concrete plan of action for these issues. I would then document what needs to be to correct the problem. Then, I would ask for a timeframe in which to fix the problem and I would want some more feedback also.

jam2007

Specializes in cardiac rehab, medical/tele, psychiatric. Has 2 years experience.

Thank you for your input; I think that is part of the plan (and I know I'm venting here, but part of why I am so upset is that I feel like some of the issues brought up were really a stretch. How do you put a plan in place for a legitimate question and calling a doctor for an allready existing order;I am sure I am not the only person who has made this mistake and it wasn't a safety issue. Believe me, I am all for constructive criticism and opportunities for growth, I am just feeling like I was unjustly run over.:imbar

shodobe

Specializes in O.R., ED, M/S.

Just be sure that any formal written plan is not only signed by you but also by the manager that is implementing it. It is better to have something in writting and signed than to have someone come later and deny the conversation. CYA!

And, get a copy of the signed form for yourself! Then, it can't be misplaced.

ivorybunny

Specializes in Cardiology, Psychiatry. Has 9 years experience.

This can be very scary especially if no one has mentioned this to you before. Document everything and ask for followup. If the manager doesn't, then bug her until it does. It wouldn't be fair to tell you that you've been practicing wrong and then not follow up to tell you that you've either improved or need more improvement.

sissiesmama, ASN, RN

Specializes in ER, TRAUMA, MED-SURG. Has 22 years experience.

Hello - I am not sure if I missed this or not. I know you said you had been at that facility for 6 months or so. In the first 2 years or so after I graduated from nursing school, I asked more questions and learned more than I did throughout nursing school.

When I got assigned a preceptor at the first facility, we didn't really "gel" very well, I think that is what they said. She didn't appreciate questions, and when I asked about some things, her answer was "Didn't you go to nursing school and take boards?" Needless to say, the questions stopped after that.

The way I look at things is basically, "The only stupid question is the one you don't ask." The manager did give me the benefit of the doubt and reassigned me to a different preceptor, and that made all the difference.

I am assuming that the questions that you have are pertinent, and it's just really unnerving that this is going on.

Good luck to you - did they give you any written policies, or anything that you may can use to help answer your own questions? Will you have anything written, a checklist or anything at all that can be referred to and can maybe CYA if it comes to that?

Anne, RNC

make a check list when taking off orders just to be sure that you are covering it all

make a lot of notes to yourself so that when you are asked a question or when it is time to chart you will have all the answers

and DON'T SWEAT THE SMALL STUFF

this probably meant more to you than to them, take it as a learning experience and do your job..that is all that they can expect of you

Moneypitt

Specializes in Med/Surg, Telemetry, Ortho.

First I would like to say I am sorry that happened to you. Are you a new nurse or just new to the facility? I would suggest you document every meeting with said management. Definately ask for specific dates, occurences, and make sure you let management know that you are taking this seriously, that you are taking notes, and would like to respond to each deficiency on your part. Ask to see the chart or a copy of the chart so that you can refer to it as reference. As to meet weekly to discuss the previous week's performance and to develop a plan with management to correct any problems.

Is there valid proof of the complaints, such as in writing? I mean a doctor can off handedly say "Nurse so and so asks to many questions" and someone can turn that in to an issue when it may only be a perception. If there is true concerns then aknowledge them. If you are not sure and are asked to sign a disciplinary form or warning them please write that you are awaiting verification of the complaint by either documentation or by having a chance to respond to the complaintent. Don't just sign your name on any dotted line.

My guess is that some one or so has it out for you and is blowing things out of proportion. Lumping it all together in an ambush tactic. Respond in a professional manner at all times. I would also try to stay under the radar and get another position when able. Or plan to outlast the interim manager. But the damage could be done by that time.

Good luck.

psalm, RN

Specializes in Staff nurse.

And, get a copy of the signed form for yourself! Then, it can't be misplaced.

Not only that, but if there is space for you to write a comment, you can write, that this is the first time anything has been brought to your attention, and that you "are open to constructive crititique", as you "grow as a part of the nursing team"

loricatus

Specializes in ED, ICU, PACU.

What you say concerns me because it is the ones that DO NOT ask a lot of questions are the ones they should be worrying about.

i'm just curious, are all hospital nursing like this? i mean i read quite a few threads about nurses who had meeting with nurse managers who felt they are practicing unsafe nursing. currently i am working at nursing home and this is never heard of in ltc setting. there are many med errors and mistakes made by nurses but they are rarely disciplined or fired unless they did something to harm the patient. when i read threads about nurses working in the hospital, they were disciplined for very minor mistakes or they have meeting with nurse managers about it. i'm thinking about changing my job in the hospital setting but reading a thread like this makes me to hesitate to change. what are your thoughts????

Scrubby

Specializes in Operating Room Nursing. Has 6 years experience.

If my manager came at me with a list of complaints I'd be asking them why they have chosen to come to me now rather than after these 'incidents occurred'. I really do think this is a form of bullying, to make you lose your confidence because you've been told you've done all these things wrong at once. Sounds like an ambush to me.

And if she tells you that all these things you've done 'wrong' mean that you are unsafe then maybe ask her what strategies she has done in the meantime to maintain patient safety if she is so concerned. Keep putting it back onto her.

Oh and I agree, look for another position in the meantime. They don't sound very supportive at all.

sissiesmama, ASN, RN

Specializes in ER, TRAUMA, MED-SURG. Has 22 years experience.

What you say concerns me because it is the ones that DO NOT ask a lot of questions are the ones they should be worrying about.

Thank you!! That was my point exactly!! I've been nursing for more than 17 yrs and in that time, I have asked a lot of questions, and if I make someone mad by asking them, that is their problem. And the ones who dont ask are the most dangerous ones at times.

Anne, RNC

jam2007

Specializes in cardiac rehab, medical/tele, psychiatric. Has 2 years experience.

Thanks for your advice. There were no dates, just information received "3rd hand" (this is what was said in meeting). I did my best to give my point of view, but there were instances, such as the doctors order, that I couldn't speak to because it was never brought to my attention. There was one incident that occurred that morning about an order and I asked a colleague, who agreed that it didn't look right. Apparently this was over heard by the interim manager because this was also brought up..I was told that "these are basic nursing skills". After the meeting I approached the person I had asked and apologized, thinking that maybe I had bothered her. She said I didn't need to, that the question was valid. Later she told me that she was taken aside and was told that should have responded "well, what do you think." So part of my concern is that it's someones perception or bias towards me that is really blowing things out of proportion. (sorry, venting again!)

polish up the resume....

and if anyone uses that line "what do you think" on me i just about blow a gasket......because i dont ask till i have exhausted my own thought process...to come to a conclusion, i dont need/want that reflective....nonsense

pagandeva2000, LPN

Specializes in Community Health, Med-Surg, Home Health.

Okay, so, you ask too many questions for a busy floor and they are questioning if you are safe?? I would be more worried about the arrogant person who doesn't ask questions at all, does what they want and risk patient safety! Sometimes, reading these things give me headaches, because nursing is so condradictory when you compare to school, who encourage you to ask to the real world, who really don't want to help you.

jam2007

Specializes in cardiac rehab, medical/tele, psychiatric. Has 2 years experience.

Okay, so, you ask too many questions for a busy floor and they are questioning if you are safe?? I would be more worried about the arrogant person who doesn't ask questions at all, does what they want and risk patient safety! Sometimes, reading these things give me headaches, because nursing is so condradictory when you compare to school, who encourage you to ask to the real world, who really don't want to help you.

I know..they say they want you to ask questions, or to let them know if you need anything; then it comes back to bite ya in the butt.

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