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Smoking cessation-to lecture or not to lecture?

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by SquatsNScrubs SquatsNScrubs (Member)

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Those working in acute care, do you address smoking cessation with patients if it is not initiated by them?

Beyond my admission assessment, which requires me to ask the patient if he or she is interested in information related to quitting smoking, I do not. I am happy to provide education or a nicotine patch if the pt asks, but I don’t find it appropriate to lecture a fully grown adult about their habits. 

For those that do-how do you word it? Are your patients receptive? 

 

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On 6/24/2019 at 11:39 AM, SquatsNScrubs said:

Those working in acute care, do you address smoking cessation with patients if it is not initiated by them?

Beyond my admission assessment, which requires me to ask the patient if he or she is interested in information related to quitting smoking, I do not. I am happy to provide education or a nicotine patch if the pt asks, but I don’t find it appropriate to lecture a fully grown adult about their habits. 

For those that do-how do you word it? Are your patients receptive? 

 

I usually just ask them what they want. I just tell them I am happy to offer smoking cessation information if they feel like listening but add they are adults and are free to make their own decisions about what is best for them. 

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cayenne06 has 10 years experience as a MSN, CNM and specializes in Reproductive & Public Health.

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I usually just say "Are you interested in quitting or cutting down? No? Well, we are always here to help if/when you are"  No judgment, no lecture, no pressure.  

I am especially conscious of this with smokers who are recovering addicts and people with  poorly controlled mental health problems.  Cigarettes can be a lifeline for them, and thats OK. I have strong feelings about allowing these types of patients to smoke while in residential/inpatient treatment- LET THEM SMOOOKKKKE! 

I am however upfront about the importance of never smoking  inside or around children, and provide harm reduction strategies based on the patients situation (if they have a newborn, medical issues, etc).  

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verene specializes in mental health, hospice.

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 I ask if they are interested in cutting back or stopping and based on that answer proceed. If there is ambivalence I may explore the topic more.  I find motivational interviewing can be helpful in these situations to explore the topic with out judgement or agenda and get a feel for where the person is at and their readiness to make changes.  I always strive to make it a discussion rather than a lecture - most of my patient who spoke can rattle of the reason not to easy enough - they aren't stupid or uninformed - and lectures are patronizing. I'd rather establish a partnership. Even if they aren't ready to make changes now, I want them comfortable speaking on the topic, and with me, for when the do get to a place that they may wish to make a change.

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