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Signs the patient population is doable ?

Posted

I mean, is there a good way to tell if the general population of a hospital are somewhat nice and respectful of nurses? Small towns, cities, suburbs, rural populations, etc? Will you please share your experiences?

whichone'spink, BSN, RN

Has 3 years experience.

No. In general, Americans everywhere are acting like schmucks. Whether it's in the inner city, middle of nowhere Nebraska, a rich suburb of Silicon Valley, or the deep South, in general people are acting terribly. You will see the same entitlement mentality everywhere you go.

westieluv

Specializes in Med/Surg, Tele, Dialysis, Hospice. Has 26 years experience.

I have been a nurse for almost 25 years, and have worked in all kinds of demographic areas, from rural, cornfield communities to large, dangerous, cities. I feel that it is more of a generational issue than a geographical one. Elderly patients and their spouses are, as a rule, more responsible, respectful, and honest than younger people. The remaining members of "the Great Generation" grew up on the idea of hard work and not expecting things to be handed to you.

The Baby Boomers are pretty good in this regard too, although you can see that when they came of age in the '60s was about the time that things started to really change in this country socially.

As far as Millennials and Gen Xers? Much, MUCH more self centered and all about what you can do for them and all about their "rights", even when sometimes what they consider to be a "right" is actually more of a privilege, or just flat out against the rules (e.g. smoking on hospital property). I feel like the entitlement attitude started sometime after the '60s and has progressively grown worse since then.

This is why I really prefer caring for the elderly population. I love the stories that they tell about when they were younger, and I love how loyal most of them are to their spouses. For example, I had a patient a few weeks ago whose husband told me that they had been married for 58 years, after having only know each other for ten days! He would frequently go over and smooth her sheets, adjust her pillow, and ask her if she was too hot, too cold, comfortable, etc. The tenderness between them brought tears to my eyes. You just don't see that in the younger generations, or if you do, it's extremely rare. Nowadays, people shack up just long enough to have kids together, and then either get married and divorced in dizzying succession, or just split up without getting married.

If you do have issues with disrespect, dishonestly, etc. when dealing with the elderly population, it's almost always when dealing with their adult children or grandchildren who came of age in a completely different generation and cultural environment.

I don't meant to sound like an old curmudgeon, because I'm not even fifty yet myself. It's just sad to see how much our society has declined, and that's why, to me, being treated with respect as a healthcare worker is much more a generational demographic than a geographical one.

Edited by westieluv

amoLucia

Specializes in LTC.

westieluv, you said a mouthful. I do LTC. The 'Greatest Generation' says 'please' and 'thank you' readily. Even the 'Boomers' do so also pretty much. I tend to believe that's the indicator of a courteous person.

dream'n, BSN, RN

Specializes in UR/PA, Hematology/Oncology, Med Surg, Psych. Has 28 years experience.

Not so sure about the Boomers (sorry), they can sometimes be very difficult. They tend to be our 50-69 year old patients and can be very demanding. The 70 year olds and up are of another generation, the silent generation. Most of the 'Greatest Generation' are now passed on, they were born from about 1901 to 1924.

Esme12, ASN, BSN, RN

Specializes in Critical Care, ED, Cath lab, CTPAC,Trauma. Has 41 years experience.

That is a tough one...I worked for an inner city catholic organization that treated us very well...they patients could be a little rough around the edges but were for the most part thankful and appreciative. I worked also a large inner city trauma center and trauma flight while we worked hard we were treated well....the patients could be violent...but that is the culture there.

I worked for a hospital in an entitled wealthy suburb. The patients/families for the most part were rude and you were the hired help....period. At this hospital I had a commercial pilot choke me against the wall because his child with a temp....100.1 rectal... waited 40 mins. The children from a famous boarding school that educated the Kenndy's were thoughtless, rude, foul mouthed brats. But the staff was treated well.

I worked for a small community hospital/critical access that had 35 beds. They treated the staff appallingly however the patients were nice.

I worked for a large community union facility. The staff were protected by the union and paid well. The administration had little respect for nurses overall. While some of the patients were very well off....they were very appreciative and thoughtful.

AS I look back it might be the actual years I worked there....from the late 70's to the late 90's. It seems after the market crashed and the jobs plummeted and the shortage went away.... nurses began being treated like cattle.

Edited by Esme12

malamud69, ADN, BSN, EMT-B

Specializes in Emergency. Has 11 years experience.

Well....we are dealing with humans...good luck.

Christy1019, ASN, RN

Specializes in Emergency/Trauma/Critical Care Nursing. Has 11 years experience.

I have been a nurse for almost 25 years, and have worked in all kinds of demographic areas, from rural, cornfield communities to large, dangerous, cities. I feel that it is more of a generational issue than a geographical one. Elderly patients and their spouses are, as a rule, more responsible, respectful, and honest than younger people. The remaining members of "the Great Generation" grew up on the idea of hard work and not expecting things to be handed to you.

The Baby Boomers are pretty good in this regard too, although you can see that when they came of age in the '60s was about the time that things started to really change in this country socially.

As far as Millennials and Gen Xers? Much, MUCH more self centered and all about what you can do for them and all about their "rights", even when sometimes what they consider to be a "right" is actually more of a privilege, or just flat out against the rules (e.g. smoking on hospital property). I feel like the entitlement attitude started sometime after the '60s and has progressively grown worse since then.

This is why I really prefer caring for the elderly population. I love the stories that they tell about when they were younger, and I love how loyal most of them are to their spouses. For example, I had a patient a few weeks ago whose husband told me that they had been married for 58 years, after having only know each other for ten days! He would frequently go over and smooth her sheets, adjust her pillow, and ask her if she was too hot, too cold, comfortable, etc. The tenderness between them brought tears to my eyes. You just don't see that in the younger generations, or if you do, it's extremely rare. Nowadays, people shack up just long enough to have kids together, and then either get married and divorced in dizzying succession, or just split up without getting married.

If you do have issues with disrespect, dishonestly, etc. when dealing with the elderly population, it's almost always when dealing with their adult children or grandchildren who came of age in a completely different generation and cultural environment.

I don't meant to sound like an old curmudgeon, because I'm not even fifty yet myself. It's just sad to see how much our society has declined, and that's why, to me, being treated with respect as a healthcare worker is much more a generational demographic than a geographical one.

Can you imagine how awful it will be to work with the elderly when this generation of entitlement becomes elderly? Not only will you have the multiple comorbidities, and the fact that they will probably be living into their 120's by then, but they will be mean and disrespectful too! Ill have to make sure I'm long retired before that happens lol.

westieluv

Specializes in Med/Surg, Tele, Dialysis, Hospice. Has 26 years experience.

Can you imagine how awful it will be to work with the elderly when this generation of entitlement becomes elderly? Not only will you have the multiple comorbidities, and the fact that they will probably be living into their 120's by then, but they will be mean and disrespectful too! Ill have to make sure I'm long retired before that happens lol.

Oh, I'll be long retired by then, if I'm even still alive. I'm 49 now, so I have a head start on them, thank God! :laugh:

loriangel14, RN

Specializes in Acute Care, Rehab, Palliative.

You can't generalize. Some people are lovley, some aren't.

whichone'spink, BSN, RN

Has 3 years experience.

Can you imagine how awful it will be to work with the elderly when this generation of entitlement becomes elderly? Not only will you have the multiple comorbidities, and the fact that they will probably be living into their 120's by then, but they will be mean and disrespectful too! Ill have to make sure I'm long retired before that happens lol.

No, this generation will die in their 50s and 60s. We won't live as long as the previous generations.

When you're saying "this generation of entitlement" to which are you referring? Is it the generation your children, grandchildren, or great-grands belong to? What a legacy...

Edited by Nola009
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Christy1019, ASN, RN

Specializes in Emergency/Trauma/Critical Care Nursing. Has 11 years experience.

Maybe I should've said culture of entitlement instead. I am turning 30 this year but know many of my peers to have this attitude we are speaking of. I was brought up in a strict household that would never have tolerated the behavior we so often encounter these days. I do not have children yet, but I still worry how things will be when it comes time for me to rely on others to care for me.

I apologize if anyone took my post as an over-generalization, I was just responding to what I see and deal with on a daily basis.

Maybe I should've said culture of entitlement instead. I am turning 30 this year but know many of my peers to have this attitude we are speaking of. I was brought up in a strict household that would never have tolerated the behavior we so often encounter these days. I do not have children yet, but I still worry how things will be when it comes time for me to rely on others to care for me.

I apologize if anyone took my post as an over-generalization, I was just responding to what I see and deal with on a daily basis.

Just speculating, but I feel that a lot of parents have failed their children. With lazy parenting, an it's all about ME attitude, ignoring problems in the house, or just being absent to the point they really don't know what's going on with their own spouse and kids. I am in my 30s now and I don't think the problem is that of one generation. I agree with you in that it's cultural... actually societal. In that our individualistic, market-driven society has eroded our culture little by little and continues to do so. I know too many people in my age range who CAN'T provide for their families adequately on two incomes let alone one, bc employers must only really care about their market shares/bottom line. Companies get subsidized left and right, and yet people shame one another for taking "government money" just to eat. Wal.Mart loves foodstamps, and so do industrial farm corporations!

I don't have kids, either. I might adopt, but I doubt that I want to bring my own children into this world.

Just speculating, but I feel that a lot of parents have failed their children. With lazy parenting, an it's all about ME attitude, ignoring problems in the house, or just being absent to the point they really don't know what's going on with their own spouse and kids. I am in my 30s now and I don't think the problem is that of one generation. I agree with you in that it's cultural... actually societal. In that our individualistic, market-driven society has eroded our culture little by little and continues to do so. I know too many people in my age range who CAN'T provide for their families adequately on two incomes let alone one, bc employers must only really care about their market shares/bottom line. Companies get subsidized left and right, and yet people shame one another for taking "government money" just to eat. Wal.Mart loves foodstamps, and so do industrial farm corporations!

I don't have kids, either. I might adopt, but I doubt that I want to bring my own children into this world.

Parenting seems to be a losing battle. I couldn't do it!

No' date=' this generation will die in their 50s and 60s. We won't live as long as the previous generations.[/quote']

Why will they not live as long?

firstinfamily, RN

Has 33 years experience.

Well, lets see. It seems to me that usually it all depends on how sick the patient is. I have had some patients who were bears when they were really sick but once they started on their recovery they improved and were actually downright cheerful by the time they were discharged. Their families may have been total bears, but usually the patient improved. Yes, I tend to like the very elderly the best, they are appreciative and show their respect. The boomers are slightly rude, most of them have had to work hard also, but tend to want to be waited on and not do much for themselves, tend to be impatient. The Gen X'rs and Millienials are what ever floats their boat types. They want service and they want it now. Some of them are just plain downright obnoxious!! That is actually the fault of the Boomers because they are the parents!! Hey, we serve the public and the public is not always kind. However, if your facility does not address the issues of horizontal violence in the workplace there are issues with your facility. Nurses are expected to take the BS because they are a "caring, empathetic group." Well, we have rights also, and I for one will not be talked to by anyone, visitor, family, patient, MD in a demeaning manner. Its called" older and bolder." We are professionals and should be treated as such. I have called security whenever a family member has threatened me in any way, if a patient becomes violent, I call security. If a MD starts to cuss, I call the Medical Director. There is no reason for any of us to tolerate such rude behavior from anyone in the healthcare environment. And by tolerating it we are encouraging it. Same as domestic violence as long as women are going to tolerate it, it will continue. Ok, I'm off my soapbox!!

firstinfamily, RN

Has 33 years experience.

Spangle: The boomers are entering the healthcare environment at much earlier ages than the previous generation with sicker diagnosis, they abused their bodies at much earlier ages, they did not do the physical work the earlier generations did. When I first started nursing I did not see MI patients younger than late 70's-80's. This age group is the one who is living longer because they did more physical work than the next generation. The boomers have more "stress" in their lives and less physical exercise. Stress causes all kinds of havoc with hormones, enzymes etc. that screw up the body mechanisms leading to chronic illnesses. The Boomers will not live as long at the previous generations. AS far as Parenting goes: it takes two incomes to live now days, and I don't mean living extravagantly. Just plain simple providing a house, car, groceries, utilities takes two incomes. Currently in my state the candidates have started their election campaigns with mandatory pre-K. Do you know why? It is not really geared for providing an early education for pre-school children, its about contributing to the tax base. If parents do not have to stay home with a young child or pay for daycare because pre-K school is available they will be working and thus the state will be getting more tax dollars. Children can learn at any age, and it is true the earlier you stimulate them to learn, the better they usually do in school. But tell me with all the technology that is available and a lot of scholastic children's programs, why do they need to have mandatory pre-K? Parenting is the hardest job you will ever do. It is challenging at any age of child or parent. It is also the most rewarding thing you may ever do!!!Yes, the world can be a terrible place, we all poison the environment, we have wars etc. But we carry on, that's what we do!!