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Should I take a CNA 2 course while Im waiting to get in an lpn program for experience

CNA/MA   (5,775 Views 13 Comments)
by countrygirl1234 countrygirl1234 (Member) Member

5,286 Profile Views; 127 Posts

I'm not taking any courses next semester so I'm not sure if I should work more or take a CNA 2 class to help me gain experience, so I'm not totally clueless when I start the LPN program. What do ya'll think would be best? Is it worth it?

NC is one of the few states that offer cna and cna 2 courses where you preform regular cna skills as well as oxygen therapy, removal of fecal impaction, and sterile dressing change on a wound over 48 hours old, urinary catheters, nutrition activities, suctions, trac. care and elimination procedures.

Edited by countrygirl1234

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Graduation2016 specializes in OB.

528 Posts; 10,277 Profile Views

Never heard of a CNA 2 course before.

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Philly_LPN_Girl has 5 years experience as a LPN.

718 Posts; 13,183 Profile Views

I think that would be an excellent course to take for skills and experience for both school and when you graduate your LPN program and it may look good on your resume when it comes time to look for a job I would do it. Good Luck :)

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JustLikeYou87 has 1 years experience.

54 Posts; 1,846 Profile Views

I agree. The experience would be great to have. Plus, once you start clinicals in your LPN program it wouldnt be the first time working with a resident.

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26 Posts; 989 Profile Views

No!! Unless you have experience working in home health care or working in LTC, you won't get hired unless you know someone who is doing the hiring.

I paid for a CNA program, passed the state exam, and I haven't been able to find a job as a CNA. Relocating is out of the question, because it isn't worth the money to relocate on my own for a job that pays less than $20,000 a year in the first year when I can get an entry level job in another field that pays near $40,000 and doesn't require me to relocate at my own expense.

CNAs are a dime in a dozen, and even LTCs are picking who they want to hire in this economy. If you don't have experience, don't waste the time or money.

The money and time you will waste towards being a CNA should go towards LVN or RN school. I spent a grand out of my own pocket to become a CNA, and couldn't find a job. I'm lucky that I did not take out a loan for it.

If someone wants to be a CNA, then go through a Work Source program or a welfare to work program. I would have done the same, but I made too much money this year before I was laid off.

I don't mean to sound negative, but I don't want people thinking that they can get a CNA job with zero experience.

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2,819 Posts; 24,957 Profile Views

Wow! I am sorry to hear that you were not able to get a CNA job after completing your CNA program. I guess things have changed now.

I will definately have to stop recommending the CNA program after hearing about your experience.

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26 Posts; 989 Profile Views

It depends in what area of the country you live in. Don't bother with the CNA program if you live in a populated area like Los Angeles, San Francisco, or etc. California is one of the worst states for CNAs with zero experience. Even LTCs or assistant living facilities in California want CNAs with at least six months experience. Even if the ad doesn't say anything about experience there are going to be applicants who have some kind of experience, and you won't be considered for the position.

Becoming a CNA is great if you're young, want a gig while going to college, or retired, but if you're looking for work after being laid off from an unrelated field, then don't do it. It's best to go back to school become an LVN or an RN if you're interested in the medical field.

It also doesn't make since that CNA is suppose to be entry level, but it requires experience. I've heard the same thing about MA (unless you're bilingual). The MA programs should include a bilingual course in their training before graduating a student.

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127 Posts; 5,286 Profile Views

I have my CNA already... I only want to do a CNA 2 course (skills listed above) to help me gain experience and knowledge to help me prepare for a RN/LPN program since I will not be taking any classes this semesterDo LPN's learn those same skills (the ones listed above) as CNA 2's?

Edited by JustBeachyNurse

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126 Posts; 4,504 Profile Views

Yes, they do. At least I have, and I'm halfway through my LPN program and have not only done all thsoe things in a lab setting but in a clinical setting as well.

I think it would be a good thing for you to do, though, because when you actually get to doing those things in a real life setting, you'll be that much more prepared. I took a CNA class and worked as one for 6 months before I began the LPN program and I'm so glad I did.

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