La la la la... I can't hear you

  1. I belong to a local mom's group on Facebook and sometimes there are questions about school district policies that I can answer.

    Recently, someone asked about medication policy for their student who had a sprained ankle and wanted to have their high schooler take ibuprofen at school. Several people commented about the policy to have a dr RX and have a parent drop it off with the nurse and SO MANY parents commented something like "Whatever, it's such a pain. My kid just carries their meds and I tell them to take it in the bathroom. Easy."

    Ug.
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    About kidzcare, MSN

    Joined: Oct '14; Posts: 3,153; Likes: 10,041
    Specialty: 5 year(s) of experience

    18 Comments

  3. by   MWOOD,LPN
    I'm in a k-8 school and most of my middle school parents do the same thing!!! Very Frustrating, all I can do is keep educating them.
  4. by   Amethya
    Quote from MWOOD,LPN
    I'm in a k-8 school and most of my middle school parents do the same thing!!! Very Frustrating, all I can do is keep educating them.
    I have this issue too, but what can I do? Nothing because they'll keep doing this. I try to educate them too.
  5. by   BiscuitRN
    I get this ALL the time. "Such a pain" even when I offer to fax the form over for them. I actually printed out the Illinois state law that prevents me from administering OTC meds without a doctor's order so I can read it verbatim when I get the angry "YOU NEED A DOCTOR'S NOTE FOR TYLENOL?!" calls/emails.

    "No ma'am, I cannot break the law because Jimmy has a headache and you didn't fill the form out."
  6. by   OldDude
    I often see things that I have explicit knowledge of go absolutely, hysterically, in orbit on Facebook... La la la la!!

    And then when I see the posters I have to play dumb...
  7. by   FSZ Student Nurse
    Quote from kidzcare
    Recently, someone asked about medication policy for their student who had a sprained ankle and wanted to have their high schooler take ibuprofen at school. Several people commented about the policy to have a dr RX and have a parent drop it off with the nurse and SO MANY parents commented something like "Whatever, it's such a pain. My kid just carries their meds and I tell them to take it in the bathroom. Easy."
    Quote from MWOOD,LPN
    I'm in a k-8 school and most of my middle school parents do the same thing!!! Very Frustrating, all I can do is keep educating them.
    Can you explain to me why this is such a big deal?

    At home, these high school students (and many of the middle school ones as well) have access to pain medications and take them appropriately. I understand being nervous about an elementary-aged child and an immature middle-schooler, but a high school student should be able to safely take their own painkillers.

    You can't give a child medicine without their parent's permission to prevent liability, but if the parent provides the med themselves then they are okay with it being used and should bear full responsibility for it.

    Not trying to be contrary. Just genuinely curious.
  8. by   Amethya
    Quote from FSZ Student Nurse
    Can you explain to me why this is such a big deal?

    At home, these high school students (and many of the middle school ones as well) have access to pain medications and take them appropriately. I understand being nervous about an elementary-aged child and an immature middle-schooler, but a high school student should be able to safely take their own painkillers.

    You can't give a child medicine without their parent's permission to prevent liability, but if the parent provides the med themselves then they are okay with it being used and should bear full responsibility for it.

    Not trying to be contrary. Just genuinely curious.
    Our issue is that sometimes you have kids that might share medications and there could be a student with that allergy. And if something happens to said student during school hours, it will be on us on why we didn't confiscate the medication. Even if we didn't know.
  9. by   peacockblue
    The big deal is that it violates our nurse parctice act. We can not prescribe or dispense medicine. Just like a nurse could not give an OTC med to a hospital patient, we cannot give meds without MD orders.
  10. by   kidzcare
    Quote from peacockblue
    The big deal is that it violates our nurse parctice act. We can not prescribe or dispense medicine. Just like a nurse could not give an OTC med to a hospital patient, we cannot give meds without MD orders.
    Precisely. Just like if I was working in the hospital and had a patient requesting tylenol but there was no standing order. I couldn't just grab my stash from my purse and give it. I could lose my license.

    Also, we cannot guarantee that the student is carrying what they say they are. A high schooler could have an ibuprofen bottle in their locker full of ritalin- for themselves or to sell.
  11. by   Kallie3006
    From our school handbook in Texas - Nonprescription medication, in the original, properly labeled container, provided by the
    parent along with a written request.

    UAP can also administer if received delegation from superintendents.
    This information is also on the Texas Health and Services website and follows the NPA.
    If I need to send ibuprofen to school with my child I buy a new bottle, fill the med admin paperwork and give it to the nurse, nurse admins per parental note instructions as long as it is a safe dose, documents said admin and goes about their day. No doctors notes needed here for OTC meds
  12. by   peacockblue
    It varies from state to state. We cannot give in Pennsylvania without a doctors order and we also cannot delegate to a UAP. Makes field trips interesting.
  13. by   JenTheSchoolRN
    Quote from FSZ Student Nurse
    Can you explain to me why this is such a big deal?

    At home, these high school students (and many of the middle school ones as well) have access to pain medications and take them appropriately. I understand being nervous about an elementary-aged child and an immature middle-schooler, but a high school student should be able to safely take their own painkillers.

    You can't give a child medicine without their parent's permission to prevent liability, but if the parent provides the med themselves then they are okay with it being used and should bear full responsibility for it.

    Not trying to be contrary. Just genuinely curious.
    Okay, I'll share a story.

    Did not happen to me, but to someone in my state.

    Student was self carrying ibuprofen for cramps. Took it exactly as she should, great. One day, her friend had cramps and asked her if she had any pain medication. Student said sure, handed off ibuprofen.

    Her friend had a known ibuprofen allergy. Went into anaphylaxis. Nurse called, luckily had standing order epi, student recovered.

    So at my school, students can take certain OTCs that are parts of my standing orders. I stock them, but parents have to sign off on permission, I must know all allergies before (listed on same form for parents to sign), and student must come to me to take the medication. Teachers who see students with any meds send the student straight to me.

    Not all high school students are also created equal when it comes to being responsible.
  14. by   brillohead
    I don't see the big problem with OTC meds and older kids.

    I used to self-carry OTC meds back in high school (in the 80s) all the time. I was driving a car, working a job, and I paid for them at the store with my own money. I didn't give them to anyone else, but even if I had, I would have said, "it's Tylenol" or "it's Motrin".... one would expect a high schooler with a known allergy would have known what they can and cannot take.

    Incidentally, Michigan doesn't have school nurses typically, and we don't have standing orders for OTC meds. It's very much a fend-for-yourself environment for school kids here.

    (I totally agree with not administering even an OTC without an order, though -- that's the same as at the hospital.)

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