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RN vs. PN exam

NCLEX   (3,884 Views | 12 Replies)

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I recently passed the NCLEX-RN exam for a different state, but I'm going to apply for the California BVNPT so I can take the NCLEX-PN exam.

Question.

I heard that the NCLEX-PN is basically an easier version of the NCLEX-RN, is that a good assumption?

If I managed to pass the NCLEX-RN, should I still study specific material for the NCLEX-PN?

Am I safe to say that I'll pass the NCLEX-PN, because I passed the NCLEX-RN?

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LadyFree28 has 10 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in Pediatrics, Rehab, Trauma.

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As someone who has taken both the NCLEX-PN (after practical nursing program) and the NCLEX-RN (after BSN program); I will tell you that the PN is NOT easier; it is a different scope of practice than the NCLEX-RN.

Your best bet is to study for the NCLEX-PN and in that study mode not get caught up in the role of the RN; if you can do that, you will have success with the NCLEX-PN.

Best wishes.

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33 Posts; 2,016 Profile Views

I recently passed the NCLEX-RN exam for a different state, but I'm going to apply for the California BVNPT so I can take the NCLEX-PN exam.

Question.

I heard that the NCLEX-PN is basically an easier version of the NCLEX-RN, is that a good assumption?

If I managed to pass the NCLEX-RN, should I still study specific material for the NCLEX-PN?

Am I safe to say that I'll pass the NCLEX-PN, because I passed the NCLEX-RN?

If u don't mind me asking why do u want to now test for PN? I'm asking cause I have never heard of anyone doing that.

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OrganizedChaos has 10 years experience as a LVN and specializes in M/S, LTC, Corrections, PDN & drug rehab.

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Ugh. It really irritates me that people think LVN school or NCLEX is easier than RN. Does that mean our job is easier too?

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LadyFree28 has 10 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in Pediatrics, Rehab, Trauma.

8,427 Posts; 76,169 Profile Views

Ugh. It really irritates me that people think LVN school or NCLEX is easier than RN. Does that mean our job is easier too?

HA!

If people only knew... ;)

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3 Articles; 10,428 Posts; 90,279 Profile Views

I'm also wondering why someone would take the PN exam, already holding an RN license...? Since legally he'd be held to the standards and scope of practice of an RN, the PN license would have little value, I'd think.

What am I missing?

As for the rest, it is a HUGE misconception that the PN exam is some kind of "junior" to the RN one, and therefore easier. Honestly, unless a newly-licensed RN is quite familiar with the scope of practice (and limits to that scope) and can answer NCLEX questions from the standpoint of an LPN, I'd think it'd be QUITE a challenge.

Thing is, I think one would be hard-pressed to find someone who could speak to that conclusively, since I really can't think of any reason for an RN to then TAKE the lpn exam!

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106 Posts; 2,624 Profile Views

I'm also wondering why someone would take the PN exam, already holding an RN license...? Since legally he'd be held to the standards and scope of practice of an RN, the PN license would have little value, I'd think.

What am I missing?

As for the rest, it is a HUGE misconception that the PN exam is some kind of "junior" to the RN one, and therefore easier. Honestly, unless a newly-licensed RN is quite familiar with the scope of practice (and limits to that scope) and can answer NCLEX questions from the standpoint of an LPN, I'd think it'd be QUITE a challenge.

Thing is, I think one would be hard-pressed to find someone who could speak to that conclusively, since I really can't think of any reason for an RN to then TAKE the lpn exam!

As I said in my post, passed NCLEX-RN for a different state, specifically, Texas, but as with having my education from the Philippines, I would have to face the concurrency issue if I were to apply for California (2-4 subjects to repeat). BVNPT-CA is separate from BRN-CA. Hence, concurrency isn't being enforced by BVNPT-CA, so I would be able to apply as a LVN, instead of knowingly throwing 200+ dollars at BRN-CA, only to get put on the 3 year time limit to finish the deficient subjects.

Since college knowledge is still fresh from graduating, I sought licensure with Texas to finish up the NCLEX-RN, with the future plan of becoming a LVN in CA, work, and once established with enough money to take up the deficient subjects after applying for the BRN-CA, I would apply for reciprocity using transcripts from my Philippine education, and local CA college subjects for the deficiencies at the same time, without having to take the NCLEX-RN again since it's reciprocity.

As being a newly licensed RN, and still running with review material and scope of practice in my brain, I can tell where a LVN scope ends, and an RN scope begins.

The concurrency issue didn't happen until 2011, so when I went to the Philippines in 2009 for my nursing education, I had no clue that it would end up like this, half way through my college life, to where I have to adjust a lot for licensure upon return to the United States. No regrets for going to the Philippines though, best time of my life, zero debt, and it's where I found myself (figuratively).

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TheCommuter has 14 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in Case mgmt., rehab, (CRRN), LTC & psych.

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Thing is, I think one would be hard-pressed to find someone who could speak to that conclusively, since I really can't think of any reason for an RN to then TAKE the lpn exam!
In recent years the California Board of Registered Nursing has been rejecting applicants who are IENs (internationally educated nurses) due to lack of clinical practicum concurrency, especially those who attended school in the Philippines. On the other hand, other states will license them.

Thus, many of the IENs obtain their RN licensure in some other state that will accept their educational credentials, then obtain LVN licensure with the hope of working in California someday.

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Ok, I see the educational component problem now. Not unlike those who choose schools in the US that are not nationally accredited, or online programs that are not accepted by all States' Boards of Nursing. Sometimes it's worth the choice and the compromises, sometimes not.

Good luck.

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nursefromcali has 6 years experience and specializes in Ambulatory, Corrections, SNF, LTC, Rehab.

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As I said in my post, passed NCLEX-RN for a different state, specifically, Texas, but as with having my education from the Philippines, I would have to face the concurrency issue if I were to apply for California (2-4 subjects to repeat). BVNPT-CA is separate from BRN-CA. Hence, concurrency isn't being enforced by BVNPT-CA, so I would be able to apply as a LVN, instead of knowingly throwing 200+ dollars at BRN-CA, only to get put on the 3 year time limit to finish the deficient subjects.

Since college knowledge is still fresh from graduating, I sought licensure with Texas to finish up the NCLEX-RN, with the future plan of becoming a LVN in CA, work, and once established with enough money to take up the deficient subjects after applying for the BRN-CA, I would apply for reciprocity using transcripts from my Philippine education, and local CA college subjects for the deficiencies at the same time, without having to take the NCLEX-RN again since it's reciprocity.

As being a newly licensed RN, and still running with review material and scope of practice in my brain, I can tell where a LVN scope ends, and an RN scope begins.

The concurrency issue didn't happen until 2011, so when I went to the Philippines in 2009 for my nursing education, I had no clue that it would end up like this, half way through my college life, to where I have to adjust a lot for licensure upon return to the United States. No regrets for going to the Philippines though, best time of my life, zero debt, and it's where I found myself (figuratively).

That's correct ! Actually that's my plan too like literally we're the same! HAHAHA! I don't wanna go out of state coz my family is here. I know working as a RN is cool out of state by I'll be dying missing my family here in cali. and I do believe in YOLO! HAHAHA :)

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nursefromcali has 6 years experience and specializes in Ambulatory, Corrections, SNF, LTC, Rehab.

245 Posts; 7,067 Profile Views

And to answer you question?? For me PN is harder lol :)

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106 Posts; 2,624 Profile Views

Thanks for the input everyone. PN isn't something to take lightly, gotta study it well.

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