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chicho chicho (New) New

first response to chest pain conplaint

TheCommuter, BSN, RN

Specializes in Case mgmt., rehab, (CRRN), LTC & psych. Has 14 years experience.

first response to chest pain conplaint
Welcome to Allnurses.com! Did you have a specific question about the first response to a complaint of chest pain?

Mr. Murse

Specializes in critical care. Has 7 years experience.

My first response is always vital signs and to assess the patient and the nature of the pain (worsens with breaths, radiates, etc.), and consider whether there are any other things going on that may cause "chest pain" (laparascopic surgery and what not). Then go from there.

parascribe

Specializes in Emergency.

My first response was denial, but finally I went to a cardiologist.

assess! vital signs, description of pain, alleviating or worsening factors. The next step then depends on the setting. in the hospital: page MD, get EKG, is the patient prescribed nitro? At home: is the patient prescribed asa or nitro? then determine if 911 should be called or call PCPs office immediately ask for clinician on call who can help asap. the steps after assess really depend on the setting and situation (such as are there other signs of acute distress? are u on telemetry floor, in the ED, in the OR or are you in pt's home?). also look into your agency's protocol. Hope this helps a little.

Esme12, ASN, BSN, RN

Specializes in Critical Care, ED, Cath lab, CTPAC,Trauma. Has 40 years experience.

I think if they are a student they need to tell us what they think first. If they are a patient we can't give medical advice.

OP we need more information in order to help you.

For inpatient:

Quickly assess

Vitals

I would order an EKG and labs (RNs in my critical care unit can do this per protocol)

Page MD

roser13, ASN, RN

Specializes in Med/Surg, Ortho, ASC. Has 17 years experience.

I'4:01 pm by turtle0206

assess! vital signs, description of pain, alleviating or worsening factors. The next step then depends on the setting. in the hospital: page MD, get EKG, is the patient prescribed nitro? At home: is the patient prescribed asa or nitro? then determine if 911 should be called or call PCPs office immediately ask for clinician on call who can help asap. the steps after assess really depend on the setting and situation (such as are there other signs of acute distress? are u on telemetry floor, in the ED, in the OR or are you in pt's home?). also look into your agency's protocol. Hope this helps a little."

9:42 pm by Dranger

For inpatient:

"Quickly assess Vitals

I would order an EKG and labs (RNs in my critical care unit can do this per protocol)

Page MD"

I'm incredibly frustrated by posters who literally answer homework questions for first-time posters (those who join Allnurses.com in order to obtain easy answers to homework questions). Those who freely give answers to basic anatomy, pharmacy & nursing questions are doing so much harm to the student who is seeking the easy way out.

Those who seek & receive easy answers to their questions are learning nothing in the process and are literally being set up for failure in the future.

Edited by roser13

Mr. Murse

Specializes in critical care. Has 7 years experience.

Those who seek & receive easy answers to their questions are learning nothing in the process and are literally being set up for failure in the future.

You could at least find out whether that is what's going on or not........possible that it's just a newer nurse making sure they made the right decisions. or just nervous about a hypothetical situation.

akulahawkRN, ADN, RN, EMT-P

Specializes in Emergency Department. Has 5 years experience.

first response to chest pain conplaint

I'm both an RN and a Paramedic. Because I need further information from you about what you're looking for, I'm going go over here to the other side of the room, sit down, mediate a bit, possibly ruminate on something a bit... and ensure that I still have a pulse.

What I do and in what order kind of depends upon many factors. I need to know what you mean before I even come close to making any sort of response to the above.

Racer15, BSN, RN

Specializes in ED. Has 5 years experience.

Throw my hands in the air and run through the ER screaming "STEMI!!"

LadyFree28, BSN, RN

Specializes in Pediatrics, Rehab, Trauma. Has 10 years experience.

Throw my hands in the air and run through the ER screaming "STEMI!!"

Oh my. :blink:

roser13, ASN, RN

Specializes in Med/Surg, Ortho, ASC. Has 17 years experience.

You could at least find out whether that is what's going on or not........possible that it's just a newer nurse making sure they made the right decisions. or just nervous about a hypothetical situation.

Of course it could. So why not ascertain the poster's status/reason for asking before giving answers?

Gotta tell ya, though, that given the fact that OP joined just to post this "question" and the manner in which the "question" is phrased does not point to an actual nurse hoping for clarification of an issue. OP couldn't even be bothered to write a full sentence.

I'll never forget the recent new member who posted (in essence) "I don't have time to chat or introduce myself to you all, just give me the answers to my homework. And make it quick."

Edited by roser13

I think OP thought he/she was doing a search , not posting. . I don't think this is a case of OP trying to trick the allnurses world into giving her/him homework answers.

I'm incredibly frustrated by posters who literally answer homework questions for first-time posters (those who join Allnurses.com in order to obtain easy answers to homework questions). Those who freely give answers to basic anatomy, pharmacy & nursing questions are doing so much harm to the student who is seeking the easy way out.

Those who seek & receive easy answers to their questions are learning nothing in the process and are literally being set up for failure in the future.

how do you know this is a student? Maybe this is a person who already knows the answer and just wants someone to validate their thoughts? You don't know and either do I. "so much harm" bolded and underlined ugh give me a break.. being able to verbalize an answer is totally different then being able to act it out. last time I checked nursing school is written work and CLINICAL..you can fake your way through the written stuff but not clinical lol who knows maybe you're right and I do agree with your thoughts.. next time I won't answer these questions without more information from OP.

roser13, ASN, RN

Specializes in Med/Surg, Ortho, ASC. Has 17 years experience.

I'm incredibly frustrated by posters who literally answer homework questions for first-time posters (those who join Allnurses.com in order to obtain easy answers to homework questions). Those who freely give answers to basic anatomy, pharmacy & nursing questions are doing so much harm to the student who is seeking the easy way out.

Those who seek & receive easy answers to their questions are learning nothing in the process and are literally being set up for failure in the future.

how do you know this is a student? Maybe this is a person who already knows the answer and just wants someone to validate their thoughts? You don't know and either do I. "so much harm" bolded and underlined ugh give me a break.. being able to verbalize an answer is totally different then being able to act it out. last time I checked nursing school is written work and CLINICAL..you can fake your way through the written stuff but not clinical lol who knows maybe you're right and I do agree with your thoughts.. next time I won't answer these questions without more information from OP.

Trust me, this is NOT (bolded and underlined) a person who already knows the answer. This is a person who either doesn't know how to formulate a complete sentence as a question or doesn't care to put the effort into trying. I'm glad that next time you will hesitate to give homework answers to first-time posters who simply want us to do their homework.

Fiona59

Has 18 years experience.

Of course it could. So why not ascertain the poster's status/reason for asking before giving answers?

Gotta tell ya, though, that given the fact that OP joined just to post this "question" and the manner in which the "question" is phrased does not point to an actual nurse hoping for clarification of an issue. OP couldn't even be bothered to write a full sentence.

I'll never forget the recent new member who posted (in essence) "I don't have time to chat or introduce myself to you all, just give me the answers to my homework. And make it quick."

I remember that poster!

It was that thread that made me decide never again answer a first time poster who was so in need of the homework hotline and lacking in interpersonal skills

OCNRN63, RN

Specializes in Oncology; medical specialty website.

Of course it could. So why not ascertain the poster's status/reason for asking before giving answers?

Gotta tell ya, though, that given the fact that OP joined just to post this "question" and the manner in which the "question" is phrased does not point to an actual nurse hoping for clarification of an issue. OP couldn't even be bothered to write a full sentence.

I'll never forget the recent new member who posted (in essence) "I don't have time to chat or introduce myself to you all, just give me the answers to my homework. And make it quick."

Where was that thread? That's one I'd like to see for myself!