An RN who has a BS vs a BSN does it really matter?

  1. I have been going back and forth about the simplest route to become an RN. As stated in my prior string I already have my BS in Business and really don't want to start over as essentially as a freshman.

    I looked into a BSN class here in Tampa at USF and it looks like a great option. One issue with that my freshmen year in college was horrendous. In fact I stopped going to class altogether and didn't both dropping and bombed an entire semester. I didn't want to be in college and could care less only went because my father made me go to college or pay rent. When your 17-18 you just don't care about the future so I screwed up. However a few years later I went back to school and my cumulative GPA was a 3.2 when I got my bachelors since I pulled almost all A's and B's. However my transcript of my 1st year is a joke. So based on that there's no use in applying to USF they will not take me.


    I started to look at HCC and they have a pretty good RN program from what I read. All I need to do is take Anatomy I / II and Micro Biology and I am done with my pre reqs. I am pretty sure I can blast thru them with little to no issue.


    Here is the big question. How would an RN who has a BS be viewed? Would they be viewed as an ASN or more on par with a BSN?

    My main reason for getting a RN is to continue in my current profession of recruiting and staffing. I have seen multiple positions working in staffing positions that require a BS and RN. I have no issue "paying my dues" and working bedside but eventually I want to get back into the staffing side and merge my 11 years of exp in staffing with my newly gained RN skills.

    In your opinion('s) is this a smart move or am I just wasting my money and time? Would a RN with a BS in another field be considered for such work or would they just skip me and go with a BSN?
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    About techjob4u

    Joined: Feb '09; Posts: 10; Likes: 1

    18 Comments

  3. by   techjob4u
    I just noticed that Ptec has a LPN online option with weekends and nights for clinical. I also noticed some schools have an online LPN to RN program. Has anyone gone this route before?
  4. by   MedSurgeMess
    generally, a BS in another field is not on par with a BSN. It just depends on the facility. See if you can find an ABSN program somewhere. I have a BS in another field, and when I had just my RN, it didn't qualify me for any BSN level jobs, but again, that may vary in the facilities in your area
  5. by   itsmejuli
    Have you actually talked to an academic adviser at USF about their second degree BSN program?
  6. by   MB37
    USF's second degree program is much more lenient with GPA requirements than their traditional program. They often accept below a 3.4. Why not apply? It's quicker than going to a CC. Even if a 3.2 doesn't quite get you in, you can take a few classes and bring it up to a 3.3/3.4.
  7. by   SummerGarden
    to answer your question, it depends on the facility and the job opening. for example, i had an mba prior to obtaining an adn. i worked on a floor where there other adns with bs, ba, and masters degrees in areas other then nursing. they were trained to be charge nurses after 1-2 years of bedside experience. so again, it depends on the facility.

    however, since you seem to have no desire to be a clinical nurse manager, having a bs degree in business plus a rn should get you what you want after you have put in 1-2 years bedside if you play by the rules. on the other hand, if you have the right connections now, you might be able to skip working by the bedside. in fact, given your 11 years of work experience you can probably land a job right out of school with your current employer or a future employer that knows your work record. don't let anyone fool you... nursing is like any other field, where connections matter!! gl!
  8. by   mbtran321
    Depends on the educational facility. Some schools graduate you with a Bachelor of Science in Nurseing (BSN), or Bachelor of Science, with a Major in Nursing (BS). My school TWU does the BS route. Its just the name. The school went with this thinking having a BS appears more diverse look then BSN which is nursing strictly...although the programs are very alike etc..Just silly stuff. I think nation wide people jsut call it a BSN. Even when I say BS, Nursing, people still call it BSN etc etc.. dont really matter. There is just mainly 3 levels of nursing of this time period, the ADN route(Community college 2 year degree), Bachelors (BSN, or BS .... 4 years) and then the LVN and the diploma nursing etc. Check with hospitals, but major big centers may want bachelors to get their magnet and other recognition etc.
  9. by   TreehuggerRN
    In the long run, no, but a BSN may help you get your foot in the door over a new ASN.
  10. by   Citigyrl
    Since your BS is non nursing it may not hold weight. I did a LPN bridge got my ADN and took all my BS classes on line. I finish my BSN next fall. Pay wise a nurse is a nurse. BSN and ADN students learn the exact same nursing skills. Some people perfer a BSN over ADN but the pay is usually the same for new nurses. BSN goes more into leadership and management issues. If you want to go the quick route do the ADN and find a RN to BSN program to do while you work. You are too far ahead to do a LPN to RN. If you didn't have a degree or experience that might be ok. The ADN takes @ 2yrs and the BSN takes @ 4
  11. by   iPink
    I'm a career changer as well. I have a BA in another field. I initially was going for the ADN, but got the advice if I want to go further in Nursing, the ADN would hinder me. I plan to be a FNP, which requires a MSN and to get the MSN, I would need the BSN. With that said, I'm going into an Accelerated BSN program that last 15 months. So, think about how far you want to go in nursing and research the schools that has at least 3.0 GPA requirements.

    FYI, with the Accelerated BSN programs are only for those who have already obtained a BA, BS, MA, or MS in another field. It can last from 12months-15 months depending on the school. At that point, to me it didn't make sense to go the ADN route and spend 2 years, and be a step behind.
    Last edit by iPink on Nov 21, '09
  12. by   RNNCcicu98
    Quick reply: Get the BSN. I was in your exact shoes, heard everyone say...oh, just get the ADN. It pays the same, etc. True, pay is the same until you get to management. Then you need a BSN. I'm going to do RN to MSN in a year or so, but wish I would have just done an accelerated program for a BSN. Competing for jobs in this market (which is horrible for new graduate nurses)....I wish I had gone for it.
  13. by   techjob4u
    No I have not contacted USF but I know they will not take me. They are rejecting students with 3.7 GPA and are super selective. Like I said I flunked out my 1st year in community college and did not go to class hung out with my GF instead typical 17-18yr old, living for the moment stuff. I do show remarkable improvement when I actually started paying for school on my own and got a little older but I did have a few withdraws in Stats II and Algebra. There’s just no way USF will take me from what I read on the boards. I also cant find anything about class time's really need a class that starts after 5pm and weekends.

    I know its going to be a longer haul but I think as far as working and moving towards a RN my best option might be to go to P-Tec or Manatee Tech for LPN about 1 year and then to LPN to RN bridge program. I was reading the strings on Excelsior College good and bad.

    Hopefully I can work as an HR Generalist / Recruiter while doing the LPN and decide if I want to keep working in HR or LPN while I finish up my RN bridge depending on where the economy is at in 1 year. I can always go for a MSN online option and skip the BSN altogether. I just don’t see the point of two B.S. Degrees. Not to mention Ptec has a LPN online program starting at 5pm with sat clinic, and Manatee has a program that start at 6pm two days a week and both are 1 year and about 5-6k for LPN.

    All I know is if I could do it all over again I would have went the nursing route from the start and not screwed around the 1st few years. However I am 38 now so was not thinking like this 20 yrs ago, and my friends would have laughed at me if I said I wanted to be a nurse.
  14. by   NeoNurseTX
    Quote from mbtran321
    Depends on the educational facility. Some schools graduate you with a Bachelor of Science in Nurseing (BSN), or Bachelor of Science, with a Major in Nursing (BS). My school TWU does the BS route. Its just the name. The school went with this thinking having a BS appears more diverse look then BSN which is nursing strictly...although the programs are very alike etc..Just silly stuff. I think nation wide people jsut call it a BSN. Even when I say BS, Nursing, people still call it BSN etc etc.. dont really matter. There is just mainly 3 levels of nursing of this time period, the ADN route(Community college 2 year degree), Bachelors (BSN, or BS .... 4 years) and then the LVN and the diploma nursing etc. Check with hospitals, but major big centers may want bachelors to get their magnet and other recognition etc.

    Hey, I know you!

    Yup, it's a BS but if you look at our transcript it is obviously the same as a BSN. My ID badge and everything I have that has the degree on it says BSN. So if I hop out of nursing, I can just put BS on my resume and it looks more marketable. It currently says "BS in Nursing".

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