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3 Reasons Why Nursing Schools are Turning Away Candidates During a Nursing Shortage

Nurses Article   (28,846 Views | 89 Replies | 1,063 Words)

Melissa Mills has 20 years experience as a BSN and specializes in Nurse Case Manager, Professor, Freelance Writer.

11 Followers; 123 Articles; 26,390 Profile Views; 286 Posts

Did you know that over 56,000 qualified nursing school applicants were turned away in 2017? This number is shocking by itself but added to the fact that we are in the midst of a nursing shortage, makes it downright confusing. Learn why this is happening at nursing schools across the country. You are reading page 7 of 3 Reasons Why Nursing Schools are Turning Away Candidates During a Nursing Shortage. If you want to start from the beginning Go to First Page.

SmilingBluEyes has 20 years experience.

2 Followers; 19,584 Posts; 65,976 Profile Views

Smiling blue eyes. If you behave on the floor with the tone of your letter, it is clear why patients are reporting you. A bit of self reflection goes a long way. I must admit as a 20-something nurse, I had similar frustrations with what you call, "the old bats." As I look back, I realize how much I learned from the "old bats" about compassionate care, a wealth of experience, life and people knowlege, personal depth and so much more. We see what we choose to see. A bit of humility and opening those blue eyes, could amaze you on what you can learn. Good luck in your future! I mean that sincerely.

What on earth is this? Please clarify.

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35 Posts; 2,263 Profile Views

I'm an OB nurse of 35 years, lactation, fetal monitoring, Lamaze certified with a BSN. The state boards says I am qualified to be an OB clinical instructor without my masters based on my experience and background. The RN school I was teaching for let me go to hire a new MSN grad with zero experience to teach OB because of credentials. Schools don't want experienced teachers in the specialty areas for the students to benefit from actual stories of working in the areas. They said they have to pay a penalty because of my lack of masters. Two conflicting stories.

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507 Posts; 5,304 Profile Views

If there is such a shortage why are new grads not getting jobs? True it is a second career for many as it was for me but that was 22 years ago; between public schools and the gazillion private schools which popped up with rationale that being a nurse rendered one recession bullet-proof I don't see any evidence of a shortage.

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glowbug has 2 years experience as a BSN, RN.

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I'm GenX, became a CNA at 36, and a LPN at 40. I've been called a flaky job hopper by other nurses and healthcare professionals because I am this way. I have 2.5 years experience as a LPN and am about to give notice at my third nursing job in order to start my fourth (where I hope to stay long term and have good expectation of doing so). I think every employee should be like me. The days of remaining loyal to one employer for 20, 30, or 40 years are LONG GONE because employers don't treat their employees in ways that inspire or reward such loyalty. You make my life hell, and I will BAIL on you. I have never quit a CNA or nursing job without the next one lined up. I am capable of staying with an employer that treats me relatively well. I stayed with one company for 5 years as a CNA and then LPN. Then they made it too hard to stay so I bailed. There are always nursing jobs, and good employees who know their value can always improve their situation if they want to. So do it.

I agree with this post. I stayed with the same company as a CNA for 5 years before I became an RN. Prior to that job, I worked for a multitude of different healthcare facilities in my state, many of which are no longer even in business due to treating its employees poorly or fraud. I only left my because I wanted a job in emergency services. I am now trying to get back to that company after having left because they treated the staff better than the company I am currently with. I will be searching for another job starting in January. Companies do not treat employees well; there are very few who do. At my job I have no support! There is no one to stand up for me. My benefits are not good, expensive, & are inferior to my last jobs benefits. Like you said, gone are the days at working for a company for 20+ years!

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glowbug has 2 years experience as a BSN, RN.

90 Posts; 3,975 Profile Views

I'm tired of reading articles on this website about how there is a nursing shortage. Unless you live in a remote, rural, small town, where people have to travel distances to obtain healthcare.....there is not a shortage. I have classmates, who I graduated with almost 2 years ago now, who still have not found a job. There are so many schools of nursing now, due to for profit colleges that hospitals have a massive applicant pool. It takes forever to get hired as a new grad with no experience, especially if you do not know anyone who already works at the hospital or have no CNA experience.

Where I work, we are down 25% of nursing staff. Is it because there are no nurses available to fill the positions? No, its because people keep quitting.

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3 Followers; 5,663 Posts; 27,718 Profile Views

I've often wondered if the nursing shortage is actually a "shortage" of facilities willing to staff appropriately.

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klone has 14 years experience as a MSN, RN and specializes in Women's Health/OB Leadership.

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I've often wondered if the nursing shortage is actually a "shortage" of facilities willing to staff appropriately.

N = 1, but no.

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Not_A_Hat_Person has 10 years experience as a RN and specializes in Geriatrics, Home Health.

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Oooooh....Yep. You right! My cohort= same. Future NPs and CRNAs all around. Not me, but hey... However, I DO want to teach someday but that's like SOOOOMEDAAAAAY.

NURSE Practitioners and Certified Registered NURSE Anesthetists aren't nurses? Are nursing instructors nurses?

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Melissa Mills has 20 years experience as a BSN and specializes in Nurse Case Manager, Professor, Freelance Writer.

11 Followers; 123 Articles; 286 Posts; 26,390 Profile Views

I truly appreciate the time and effort spent by anyone who posts a well put together article here at allnurses. I think it's important and valuable to consider and start discussion on the issues that affect us as professionals.

I'm sorry to need to say, though, that I think Ms. Mills misses the mark right from the start. She states her premise as follows:

"Over 56,000 qualified nursing school applicants were turned away in 2017. You read that right - 56,000. This is happening while hospitals and clinics continue to report a nursing shortage."

I would sincerely appreciate seeing evidence that the open positions in nursing as well as chronically understaffed facilities and agencies is related to not graduating enough nursing students. What I see and hear instead is a shortage of attractive opportunities for experienced nurses, and for new grads a wide gap in their expectations versus the reality of the job market and actually working as a nurse.

Hi there Katillac - Thanks so much for your comments. If you follow the links in the OP, you can see that I have used various articles as evidence that students are being turned away. I agree that graduating more students is not likely not going to solve anything. The issues related to nursing shortages and other staffing issues go far deeper than one area, like education. However, I think it is imperative that we learn more about the issues, form our own opinions, and decide how best to act to make a postiive impact for our healthcare industry and the future of nursing.

Thanks again for your thoughts. ~Melissa

Edited by tnbutterfly

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Melissa Mills has 20 years experience as a BSN and specializes in Nurse Case Manager, Professor, Freelance Writer.

11 Followers; 123 Articles; 286 Posts; 26,390 Profile Views

IMHO, nurses should make a push to transition from non-revenue generating staff to revenue-generators that have billable time to primary payers. Hospitals would then start looking at nurses like the assets they are and ratios and working environments would improve dramatically.

BostonFNP - I wish there was a way to "double like" this!!! I agree 100%!

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Silver_Rik has 1 years experience as a ASN and specializes in Perioperative intern.

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NURSE Practitioners and Certified Registered NURSE Anesthetists aren't nurses? Are nursing instructors nurses?

The way I read it

babychickens isn't saying that any of those aren't nurses. I think they are implying that many undergrad nursing students spend too much time planning their careers as NPs and CRNAs rather than focusing on learning to be fundamentally sound RNs first.

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wolfbuddy has 20 years experience and specializes in neurosurgery, informatics.

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There has been a nursing shortage for at least 30 years; as that was the situation in 1987 when I went to work and is still the situation now. In the southeast wages are lower than many other parts of the country; the main problem is wages. Most look at nursing and the risks/hazards in that career field and ask why would I become a nurse. They think with 4 years of education (other than nursing) there would be less risk and higher wages

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