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3 Reasons Why Nursing Schools are Turning Away Candidates During a Nursing Shortage

Nurses Article   (28,791 Views | 89 Replies | 1,063 Words)

Melissa Mills has 20 years experience as a BSN and specializes in Nurse Case Manager, Professor, Freelance Writer.

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Did you know that over 56,000 qualified nursing school applicants were turned away in 2017? This number is shocking by itself but added to the fact that we are in the midst of a nursing shortage, makes it downright confusing. Learn why this is happening at nursing schools across the country. You are reading page 6 of 3 Reasons Why Nursing Schools are Turning Away Candidates During a Nursing Shortage. If you want to start from the beginning Go to First Page.

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I imagine it's still called "nursing school" for the same reasons med school, law school, business school, journalism school, drama school, etc., are all still referred to as "school," and those are graduate degrees. Doesn't seem to bother them ...

I never had a problem with 'nursing school'.

What drove me crazy when I was in school was my mom proudly telling people her daughter was in "nurses training". I tried to get her to change her terminology, but it was too ingrained in her and I eventually gave up.

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Smiling blue eyes. If you behave on the floor with the tone of your letter, it is clear why patients are reporting you. A bit of self reflection goes a long way. I must admit as a 20-something nurse, I had similar frustrations with what you call, "the old bats." As I look back, I realize how much I learned from the "old bats" about compassionate care, a wealth of experience, life and people knowlege, personal depth and so much more. We see what we choose to see. A bit of humility and opening those blue eyes, could amaze you on what you can learn. Good luck in your future! I mean that sincerely.

Please do inform us what you're talking about. Who wrote a letter? Who said patients are reporting SmilingBlueEyes for making them dissatisfied any more than they're reporting anyone else (which is a common problem every working nurse at least knows about even if not personally reported)? And do let us know exactly what SBE actually said about "the old bats."

Thx.

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I am sorry to report I live in a rural area where "sign-on bonuses" are making a comeback. But, yet, I am still underemployed. And I agree, the hiring process has become absurd. I too have been hired over the phone several times. I used to just walk into a place and be working the next day or two. It is discouraging. And don't forget, HR has to justify their existence somehow. There was a teaching job here that I applied for. It was 5 days a week for an hour and a half in the morning and an hour and a half in the after noon! Basically, teaching 2 classes would have prevented me from having any other job and I would have been paid 1500 per class or something... I think 3,000 for 4 months of work at a community college. Just insane! And they must have nurses that agree to these terms because someone is filling these jobs. Also, I don't mean to be a pessimist but I think it's about to get worse. 30 hospitals closed last year according to Becker's, and 15% are in fiscal trouble. The Gov't has cut payments as much as they can. The powers that be will be trying to cut staffing even more.

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Katillac has 18 years experience as a RN.

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Please do inform us what you're talking about. Who wrote a letter? Who said patients are reporting SmilingBlueEyes for making them dissatisfied any more than they're reporting anyone else (which is a common problem every working nurse at least knows about even if not personally reported)? And do let us know exactly what SBE actually said about "the old bats."

Thx.

I think looking back in the thread I can shed some light. SBE commented on facility response to complaints in general, not about her, and referred to "crusty old bats" retiring.

"There IS a shortage.

 

Of nurses willing to put up with continuing worsening work conditions. Overwork, under-pay, too many patient assignments, Surveys that put patients in change and can slam a nurse for not giving a diabetic a chocolate cake, unappreciative administrators who only tell us when we are not performing "well enough".....I could go on .

 

You get what I am saying.

 

I think Gen Z/Millennial people are very savvy. They will work at a job that best suits them at the time and move on. Why shouldn't they? Loyalty is a one-way street in the corporate world. They know this.

 

The future is scary. Currently, new nurses are made charge nurses or managers with less than 6 months' total experience. I fear for my loved ones or myself in the next 20 years and beyond, needing any competent nursing care. The Gen Z generation won't put up with what the prior generations have. They will move to greener pastures quickly and often. The crusty old bats will have retired/passed on. Scary indeed."

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Another example of the "supposed" nursing shortage is when I worked on a floor and the manager got a bonus for coming in "under budget". Well, how is this ethical if the only way to "come in under budget" is to make us work short every shift.

Kaiser does this.

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Aunt Slappy has 2 years experience and specializes in hospice, LTC, public health, occupational health.

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I think Gen Z/Millennial people are very savvy. They will work at a job that best suits them at the time and move on. Why shouldn't they? Loyalty is a one-way street in the corporate world. They know this.

The future is scary. Currently, new nurses are made charge nurses or managers with less than 6 months' total experience. I fear for my loved ones or myself in the next 20 years and beyond, needing any competent nursing care. The Gen Z generation won't put up with what the prior generations have. They will move to greener pastures quickly and often. The crusty old bats will have retired/passed on. Scary indeed.

I'm GenX, became a CNA at 36, and a LPN at 40. I've been called a flaky job hopper by other nurses and healthcare professionals because I am this way. I have 2.5 years experience as a LPN and am about to give notice at my third nursing job in order to start my fourth (where I hope to stay long term and have good expectation of doing so). I think every employee should be like me. The days of remaining loyal to one employer for 20, 30, or 40 years are LONG GONE because employers don't treat their employees in ways that inspire or reward such loyalty. You make my life hell, and I will BAIL on you. I have never quit a CNA or nursing job without the next one lined up. I am capable of staying with an employer that treats me relatively well. I stayed with one company for 5 years as a CNA and then LPN. Then they made it too hard to stay so I bailed. There are always nursing jobs, and good employees who know their value can always improve their situation if they want to. So do it.

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nursel56 has 25+ years experience and specializes in Peds/outpatient FP,derm,allergy/private duty.

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You can call it nursing "shooting itself in the foot," but it's just the nursing departments of colleges and universities being held to the same academic standards for faculty that all the other departments have to meet. And why shouldn't they be? If we want to be taken seriously as an academic discipline, we have to do the same academic "heavy lifting" that everyone else does. I, for one, do not want to see nursing get some special exception that our programs can have lower standards than all the other departments in a college or university. That makes us "second class citizens" at the schools.

You're right. When I wrote that I was thinking from a perspective of my student-self eons ago, as the nurse I replied to had a background similar to my own past instructors who I have grown to appreciate more as time goes by. I wasn't taking the broader view of nursing as it compares to other professional fields in the present day.

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This is so true , as a new LPN I've had to work home health because the pay else where is so low I wouldn't be able to live or my experience isn't enough for employers .

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Wannabenurseneko has 1 years experience.

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If she thinks you are all so horrible ask her this:

"WHO raised you?"

That oughta shut her up.

I raised Millennials and Gen Z people. I raised them to be responsible, but to always care for self, first. I think they are a savvy group. Being accused of being lazy or selfish by Boomers and Gen X: No, they are just smart. They are not martyrs. That is good!

Also, Boomers were called the "me" generation. See everyone wants to stereotype but NO ONE wants to fit in the box.

So just rock on.

I am going to ask my mom that. And the sad part is she is a boomer and calls my generation selfish. Yet she complains when she doesn't get her check lol.

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Silver_Rik has 1 years experience as a ASN and specializes in Perioperative intern.

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As pointed out, qualified means meeting minimum standards for acceptance. While looking at acceptances and first time NCLEX pass rates at often forget to look at retention and graduation rates. My cohort started with 60 and we have 26 left after just 2 semesters (some are out of the program and some have dropped back.). I think 50% graduation rates are not uncommon in nursing programs.

US medical schools get 60,000 applicants - basically all of whom are minimally qualified - and turn away 40,000 of them. Applicants with 3.8 and higher GPA, and applicants with high MCAT scores, get turned away. But med school graduation rates run 97% or better and 95% match into residency on their first try.

Now there are people who weren't great students in previous academic endeavors who become amazing nurses, and super students who aren't cut out for nursing, so there should be flexibility; but maybe it's better for the nursing profession and for patients to have high standards from the start, rather than trying to get every minimally qualified applicant into a program.

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SmilingBluEyes has 20 years experience.

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Please do inform us what you're talking about. Who wrote a letter? Who said patients are reporting SmilingBlueEyes for making them dissatisfied any more than they're reporting anyone else (which is a common problem every working nurse at least knows about even if not personally reported)? And do let us know exactly what SBE actually said about "the old bats."

Thx.

Yes, please answer this post.

WHAT in blue blazes are you talking about?

What letter? I have done nothing but support young people in nursing in my posts.

I am completely confused at what you're saying here.

And patients are NOT reporting me; I have really good relationships with my patients.

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SmilingBluEyes has 20 years experience.

2 Followers; 19,584 Posts; 65,966 Profile Views

Please do inform us what you're talking about. Who wrote a letter? Who said patients are reporting SmilingBlueEyes for making them dissatisfied any more than they're reporting anyone else (which is a common problem every working nurse at least knows about even if not personally reported)? And do let us know exactly what SBE actually said about "the old bats."

Thx.

I AM a crusty old bat. So again, this post quoted is completely baffling to me.

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