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"You cannot have BSN or MSN on your nametag?"

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nursebrandie28 is a BSN, RN and specializes in Critical Care/Teaching.

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You are reading page 13 of "You cannot have BSN or MSN on your nametag?". If you want to start from the beginning Go to First Page.

jkaee has 15 years experience and specializes in Gerontological Nursing, Acute Rehab.

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i dare say that my (and many others) very existence contradicts this notion.

]

:yeah::yeah::yeah::yeah:

'nuff said.

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72 Posts; 1,389 Profile Views

:uhoh3::uhoh3::uhoh3:

The eye rolling is not directed at you, poster, but rather at those instructors with a blatantly obvious agenda.....

I am so serious. It gets so ridiculous sometimes that one particular instructor never gets around to lecture. I don't understand it..... I chose the BSN program bc I already have a BS in microbiology otherwise I would have went the ASN route. My mother and two aunts are RNs and they are all kick-a%$ nurses (all 3 have diff degrees). As a student I just don't understand the debate period. WHO CARES???? But I have seen the conflicts and bad-mouthing during clinicals in the hospitals (as a student you see all.....). The hospitals we have clinicals at are going to magnet status so name badges are changing. This kind of arguing is so very discouraging to nursing students. I thought nurses were supposed to be caring, supportive, etc. and believe me I roll eyes right along with you :rolleyes::rolleyes::rolleyes:

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kbrn2002 has 25 years experience as a ADN, RN and specializes in Geriatrics.

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I, too, am on the fence. When I introduce myself to most people here at the hospital, I simply use my first name and tell people that I am "one of the nurses here" ... or maybe, "one of the nurse-educators" so that they know I don't do direct-patient care (which might lead them to expect all sorts of bedside expertise that I let go years ago.)

Here on allnurses, I don't usually sign my posts -- unless I am feel it is relevant to the topic and the reader should know that I have my PhD and/or am certified in my specialty.

PMFB-RN wrote the "RN ... is everything they need to know about me." Well, that might be true for him/her -- but that is not true for me. As my expertise is NOT bedside care anymore, but rather education, research, and evidence-based practice, sometimes it is important that people know I have those areas of expertise and not assume that I have the same areas of expertise as the staff nurses.

There are times when I feel my credentials are important and I feel it is wrong for nursing as a profession to not recognize that we are not all alike. We do have different knowledge and skill sets -- and that needs to be acknowledged sometimes, too.

Agreed 100%...in your area of nursing practice, yes it is important that the people you are dealing with are aware of your qualifications. But in direct patient care practice the patient has no need to have an alphabet soup list of credentials presented to them. Heck, I've been a nurse for 15 years and have to look up some of the credentials/certificates posted!

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For those who think a BSN should be the entry level of education to be a R.N., let's just grandfather everybody into this policy starting in 2 years (so those in school can prepare for the change). I also went to nursing school in the 1980's (I am a BSN and glad I went that route) -and at that time it looked as if a BSN would become standard. Of course, that never happened due to infighting among nurses themselves. In the meantime the hospitals and other employers took advantage of this infighting to split us, and hire all they could get for the lowest $ they could pay; pitting one against the other. If you are lucky enough to work in a magnet hospital or government facility, then your educational accomplishments make a difference. Otherwise it is the free market working just as it is supposed to!

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Esme12 is a ASN, BSN, RN and specializes in Critical Care, ED, Cath lab, CTPAC,Trauma.

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I am not seeing it as funny.

I don't think anyone should mock the person who posted this. There should be a differentiation for more education as there is in teaching. We get NOTHING for going for a BSN, and some people want at least some recognition. I don't think it belongs on a nametag but I don't think it is funny either.

I think that was the point.....

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PMFB-RN has 16 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in burn ICU, SICU, ER, Traum Rapid Response.

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*** I have no idea what is lucky about working in a Magnet hospital, unless you meant lucky to be working at all. I have worked, until recently, for the last 5 years at a Magnet hospital, and before that 5 years at a university medical center that also had Magnet certification. Neither one could care one little bit about a nurses education level. There was certainly no more pay for BSN or MSN. There was no hiring preference, except that one hospital refused to hire new grad BSNs into their Critical Care Nurse Residency for the SICU, ADNs only. The university didn't have any way of paying for a nurse to get a BSN. They had like $1500/ year in tuition reimbursement only.

Neither place was a very nice place to work. If your hospital appreciated your BSN it's not because of Magnet certification.

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"Clinically I had a great education with my ADN. That prepared me to be a bedside nurse. My BSN program enhanced my knowledge - I had community health nursing, advanced med-surg, and my electives which I chose included management classes. I had other non-nursing classes to such as statistics. Am I a better nurse since my BSN? I have to say yes. Am I worth more to my employer? Again, yes. I have skills and knowledge that I did not have before."

Okay, I have something to add here. I have a BS in nutrition/dietetics. This required 5 years (not just 4) of chemistry, organic chemistry, biochemistry, microbiology, advanced anatomy and physiology (human cadavers and animal experiments here- I suffered), multiple management courses, multiple clinical courses, food science, adv nutrition and metabolism (biochem again) etc, etc.... This is more science than is required in a BSN program.

I went through an ADN program for $7000 instead of 20K for a BSN program because I wasn't interested in taking a bunch of individual university graduation requirements and spending another year in school. My logic was that if I wanted to move on later, I could do a MSN or an ARNP program without a BSN.

Can I tell you that I was spinning circles around other students in ABGs and F&Es? Besides, after working in clinical nutrition for 10 years, I was familiar with all of my med-surg subjects on a whole different level with practical application. And the chemistry requirements for nursing? EASY!!!

And you mean to tell me that a BSN is better than an entire degree that has me several steps ahead of even seasoned nurses in another related field?

This whole debate is ridiculous. I won't even begin to get into book knowledge vs practical knowledge. Most of us who come along for the ride as a second career have plenty of "other" experiences to add to the nursing pot. Should I start adverstising that on my nametag too?

Oh and I had community health nursing in my ADN program as well. And statistics..... and logic..... and I'd done other higher math courses for my previous degree, etc, etc, etc. I'm sure that if I printed up my transcripts and compared them to yours, I'd have several additional years of education on your BSN. Sorry!

First of all what has this to do with anything? Second of all you have no idea what I studied in my BSN program. Third, I have also an MBA and two post-grad certificates. Why are you insulting me? I said NOTHING about your education not being valuable, I only said that getting the BSN made me more valuable than just having the ADN. Any additional education can make a person more valuable. I am glad you are so brilliant. I also had many higher level math courses and science courses. I don't brag about it because it means nothing, I am not smarter than anyone else, I simply worked and earned the credits. I am not sure what your point is, but you certainly have a chip on your shoulder. I think you should be able to transfer courses into a BSN program and get a nursing degree if you want one, just as I was able to transfer some courses between fields to do what I have done. I did not get an MSN because it would not have helped me with my goals. I started to, but switched. Diets and nutrition are important in nursing, but that is what we have dieticians to consult for. Nursing is not nutrition and nutrition is not nursing. Some things overlap, but no, it is not the same as a nursing degree to a nurse.

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PMFB-RN has 16 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in burn ICU, SICU, ER, Traum Rapid Response.

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I think it was the AACN that made the statement that a BSN was the professional entry point into nursing. I cannot remember the year they srtated that. I had an instructor say she saw the day when the MSN would be the accepted standard.

*** I very much disagree with her. Unless there is some LARGE increase in bedside nurses pay and respect and inprovement in working conditions. I very much doubt that more than a few people would be willing to make the time and money investment of a masters degree to make what we make and do what we do.

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roser13 has 17 years experience as a ASN, RN and specializes in Med/Surg, Ortho, ASC.

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I think it was the AACN that made the statement that a BSN was the professional entry point into nursing. I cannot remember the year they srtated that. I had an instructor say she saw the day when the MSN would be the accepted standard.

This urban legend makes me laugh every time it comes around. And trust me, it has come around more than a few times in my relatively short nursing career.

The day it actually happens (minimum entry level into nursing = BSN), will be equivalent to the 2nd coming, at least in terms of being long-awaited.

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*** I have no idea what is lucky about working in a Magnet hospital, unless you meant lucky to be working at all. I have worked, until recently, for the last 5 years at a Magnet hospital, and before that 5 years at a university medical center that also had Magnet certification. Neither one could care one little bit about a nurses education level. There was certainly no more pay for BSN or MSN. There was no hiring preference, except that one hospital refused to hire new grad BSNs into their Critical Care Nurse Residency for the SICU, ADNs only. The university didn't have any way of paying for a nurse to get a BSN. They had like $1500/ year in tuition reimbursement only.

Neither place was a very nice place to work. If your hospital appreciated your BSN it's not because of Magnet certification.

Thanks for explaining that. Somewhere I got the idea that BSN nurses were paid more at Magnet hospitals.

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I very much doubt that more than a few people would be willing to make the time and money investment of a masters degree to make what we make and do what we do.

The theory being (for those who support it) is that you effect the supply and demand side in favor of the profession as a whole.

The flaw in this line of thought is precisely as you pointed out and is a diservice to the public good. The counterpoint to that in turn being that the public good is served by the purported higher quality of personnel.

And so on and on the debate. However, in the end the politicians (legislative branch) are not as silly as they would seem. They will keep the floodgates open for people such as myself to fill the trenches.

Incidentally, all this is very relevant to the original post as it pertains to the very meaning of the alphabet soup in the first place.

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metal_m0nk is a BSN, RN and specializes in ICU.

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First of all what has this to do with anything? Second of all you have no idea what I studied in my BSN program. Third, I have also an MBA and two post-grad certificates. Why are you insulting me? I said NOTHING about your education not being valuable, I only said that getting the BSN made me more valuable than just having the ADN. Any additional education can make a person more valuable. I am glad you are so brilliant. I also had many higher level math courses and science courses. I don't brag about it because it means nothing, I am not smarter than anyone else, I simply worked and earned the credits. I am not sure what your point is, but you certainly have a chip on your shoulder. I think you should be able to transfer courses into a BSN program and get a nursing degree if you want one, just as I was able to transfer some courses between fields to do what I have done. I did not get an MSN because it would not have helped me with my goals. I started to, but switched. Diets and nutrition are important in nursing, but that is what we have dieticians to consult for. Nursing is not nutrition and nutrition is not nursing. Some things overlap, but no, it is not the same as a nursing degree to a nurse.

Her point is valid. It is especially valid considering that this discussion is rooted in the notion of people being allowed to take pride in their intellectual accomplishments. She has explained that the coursework she completed for her degree is quite relevant to nursing and to medicine. Perhaps to her, the work she put in for her bachelor's degree does mean something, just the same as those here who have stated that they would like their BSN to be recognized as meaningful - an assertion which you support. They and holisticallyminded are saying the same things. In all fairness, shouldn't we then, also characterize the BSN earners in this thread who have posted similar concerns as having chips on their shoulders?

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